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Dash pad repair

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  • silverhawk
    replied
    That's not such a bad idea actually, great thinking!

    Leave a comment:


  • cultural infidel
    replied
    pull the original and make a mold, then fiberglass one? maybe that's crazy talk though

    Leave a comment:


  • jimmijim8
    replied
    Oh no, it won't do

    Yeah. don't even attempt fixing it. You will certainally fail being equipped with a predisposed negative attitude. Yeah, don't even make an attempt. Just take a few 20 dollar bills and stick 'em over the cracks using double sided tape. On the other hand, give it your best shot and you may be happy or not with your results but still have learned something. Nothing is more hopeless than a negative outset/attitude. If you succed you won't be the first to repair a cracked dash successfully. It ain't brain surgery so if it does not suit your standards the first time, do it over and avoid making the same mistakes cheers jimmijim
    Last edited by jimmijim8; 10-09-2012, 04:17 PM.

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  • AnAvanti4Bob
    replied
    Thanks to all who responded. There seems to be little hope to successfully repair aging dashes. A large site search reveals more of the same - the solution seems to be to go "new" or NOS...Bob

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  • Welcome
    replied
    Originally posted by silverhawk View Post
    Hey guys,


    I have the classic cracking on my '61 Lark dash, coming from the corners of the speaker grill. They are about a inch and a half long, and at the max .030" wide. There is a little unevenness and "puckering" effect at the edges of the cracks.

    Has anyone made a successful repair on these? I'd love to have a nice original or reproduction, but until then I'd like to make the best of what I have.

    Leave a comment:


  • gordr
    replied
    I think I have mentioned this before, and have not yet actually tried it, but it ought to work. Autobody supply stores sell a flexible filler that is meant for the flexy plastic parts on newer cars. (Think air dams, etc.) I used some for the air dam on a friend's VW Jetta, and it worked like a charm. It is sandable, too.

    Grind out the cracks, grinding back far enough to get beyond the up-curled part. Make sure the vinyl skin is feather-edged. Fill the crack with the flex filler, and trowel it flush with a bondo spreader. Let it set, and sand it flush. Paint to match, or paint the whole dash.

    I have an Avanti dash here, and it is just awful; looks like a mud flat in July. I figure, fill the worst cracks as described, and spread the flex filler directly into the smaller cracks. Sand smooth, coat entire dash pad with glue, and stick on stretchy fabric like old pantihose or Spandex, and roll it into the textured grooves with a small roller. Purpose of the fabric is to keep surface from re-cracking as material beneath continues to shrink. Once glue is dry, spray the whole dash with truck bedliner or gravel guard, and paint to suit. You should preserve the molded feature lines, but with a pebble texture instead of a grained texture. Might not look real right, but it should look decent.

    Leave a comment:


  • silverhawk
    replied
    Thanks for the answers guys, it is indeed a start. If I could find a replacement or new pad that would be wonderful.

    For some reason though, I dunno if I really want a new padded dash that S.I sells now (Although I'm sure I'm going to get one eventually). But what about the older reproductions I heard about, that were either hard plastic or fiberglass? Then it would look stock, and last longer. Any idea's guys?

    Leave a comment:


  • mbstude
    replied
    And there's always Jim Lawrence who redoes 'em.

    Leave a comment:


  • rockinhawk
    replied
    My 62 Lark had an ugly cracked, blistered, peeling, and melted dash pad. I peeled and scraped it off and found a nice firm metal dash underneath. I think I'm just gonn'a paint it and leave it alone.

    Leave a comment:


  • Bob Andrews
    replied
    I've tried all manner of fixes over the last 30 or so years, and never found one that even remotely works. It's just one of those things.

    You have two problems at once- vinyl breaking down and padding underneath doing the same. Usually the two go bad by their own separate paths, making the problem even worse.

    You have three choices: Cover it, ignore it, or replace it. Sometimes you can get a nice used pad, or an NOS (both becoming more unlikely every day), or if not, Just Dashes can make one. But I have yet to see any "repair" that has any quality or durability.

    Sorry, wish I had a better answer.

    Leave a comment:


  • AnAvanti4Bob
    replied
    Bump...lotsa views, but no takers ...anybody have any ideas to preserve what we have, short of a whole new dash pad? Bob

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  • silverhawk
    replied
    Bump................

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  • AnAvanti4Bob
    replied
    I am also interested in any info provided as I recently noted that my 1963 Avanti dash pad has several hairline cracks forming in the "valleys" (depressions) of the embossed design. No cracks are yet seen in the edges, defroster reliefs or by the speaker opening...thanks for any info...Bob (R-1 #3062)

    Leave a comment:


  • silverhawk
    started a topic Interior: Dash pad repair

    Dash pad repair

    Hey guys,


    I have the classic cracking on my '61 Lark dash, coming from the corners of the speaker grill. They are about a inch and a half long, and at the max .030" wide. There is a little unevenness and "puckering" effect at the edges of the cracks.

    Has anyone made a successful repair on these? I'd love to have a nice original or reproduction, but until then I'd like to make the best of what I have.
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