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  • #16
    Originally posted by tomnoller View Post
    I know it's not too smart to go without the NS switch, so I'll bite the bullet and get one from SI if they're still available.
    I had a similar problem with my '64 Daytona Powershift (equipped with a floor shift). It would start in P, but not in N. The replacement switch was quite expensive, as I recall. I found that by carefully bending the tabs on the housing, the switch could be disassembled. I cleaned the contacts, and bent the rotating copper tab a bit to ensure good contact. After carefully re-assembling it, everything worked fine. If you're looking at buying a new switch, you've got nothing to lose by trying the repair.

    Another thought... Is it possible that, in the process of installing the TH, the rod between the shift linkage and the NS switch might have gotten bent? I would remove the linkage from the car, and check the switch operation on the bench. Use an ohmmeter to check the operation of the NS switch contacts. They should close when the shifter is in either the P or N detent. Slowly move the shifter through its range, watching the meter. If the switch closes in the wrong place, the rod needs to be adjusted (bent).
    Jim Bradley
    Lake Monticello, VA
    '78 Avanti II
    sigpic

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    • #17
      Originally posted by Bob Caser View Post
      I would keep the Stude solenoid switch. You can use a single wire from the n/s switch to the solenoid (s) terminal and a battery cable from the solenoid switch to the battery lug on the starter. The secret is to bridge the two wires on the Chevy solenoid. This will eliminate the two small wires from the Chevy solenoid.
      MAD Enterprise offers a kit to do this
      What you gain is stronger voltage and helps with any future heat soak problems because the starter is so close to the exhaust system.
      I still believe you will have to run a ground wire on the solenoid switch, by using your remote starter the way you have just by passed the circuit.

      Bob
      Bob, I would have to respectfully disagree. By having two solenoids in in series in the starting circuit, the starting current has to flow through two sets of contacts rather than one. Since each contact set has resistance, Ohms law tells us that there will be a voltage drop across each. As a result, the voltage to the starter will actually be less than it would be with only one solenoid. The solenoid tips pit and erode in time, so their resistance increases.

      There will be no difference in heat soak. The starter and its solenoid will see exactly the same heat exposure whether or not the fender mounted solenoid is there or not. My '78 Avanti has the Chevy 350. I have had no heat soak (or other) issues with the starter. The wire to the solenoid is not at all near the exhaust.
      Jim Bradley
      Lake Monticello, VA
      '78 Avanti II
      sigpic

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      • #18
        Originally posted by Rerun View Post
        Bob, I would have to respectfully disagree. By having two solenoids in in series in the starting circuit, the starting current has to flow through two sets of contacts rather than one. Since each contact set has resistance, Ohms law tells us that there will be a voltage drop across each. As a result, the voltage to the starter will actually be less than it would be with only one solenoid. The solenoid tips pit and erode in time, so their resistance increases.

        There will be no difference in heat soak. The starter and its solenoid will see exactly the same heat exposure whether or not the fender mounted solenoid is there or not. My '78 Avanti has the Chevy 350. I have had no heat soak (or other) issues with the starter. The wire to the solenoid is not at all near the exhaust.
        In the hot rod world there has been a problem with heat soak and starter location. There is a company Mad Enterprise who came up with the idea of using the Ford solenoid mounted on the fender to produce constant cranking voltage, thus eliminating start up problems. The heat soak problem is generally a problem with higher performance motors. I also own Avanti's one of which has had a very hi horsepower Chevy engine which because of large exhaust had heat soak problems.

        Check the Mad Enterprise web site and review "Soak it Kit "

        Bob Caser
        mrbobinc

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