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  • kmac530
    replied
    Yeah Brian, I am going to replace both of the front 2 rods and have them all reconditioned and checked for straightness just to be sure.
    I am going to get my crank checked, but I dont think it is repairable, so I will ride up and get the one Bob K has offered me and have that one turned and checked and then order the right bearings for the work I have had done. Just start over basically. I will go crazy checking EVERY passage, galley/gallery, orifice, port, opening, hose, tube, and hole in the block and crank for blockage.

    Edit: I think this time, before I put the pan on, I will put the pick up screen in a pail of oil and spin the OP drive and see that the oil is running everywhere, before I button it up and and install the motor....just for peace of mind. Lay a sheet of plastic down, spin the pump and watch oil come out of EVERY bearing fairly equally, then I can have some confidence.
    Last edited by kmac530; 05-19-2012, 12:49 PM. Reason: add

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  • brian6373
    replied
    That's gotta be a real heartbreaker, but it sounds to me like you know your way around an engine rebuild. I would check the rods for twist, and streched ( out-of-round ) big ends when you do the tear-down inspection, and see if that might be the reason. I've done a lot of different brand x engines, but not a Studebaker, so I can't say how strong the rods are. I do remember the SBC stock rods were puny compared to the Mopar big block rods.
    Good luck

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  • Alan
    replied
    The guy that owns the shop has been in business for 35 years in the same place and all he does are cranks. I have only found 1 or 2 others over the years and they are now retired.

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  • kmac530
    replied
    Joe,
    Thanks for the heads up. Wayne's engines is still here in Riverside. They have a mediocre reputation here in So Cal these days. They can do really good work, but they are usually pretty busy and have become more of a production shop, and like many things, when things go to high production, quality often suffers and the skill level of all of the new production employees is not always up to par. I would consider using them if I had no other options, but they are not my first choice.

    I just found out from Bud that my old favorite shop in Lawndale is still open and working, Vellio's. They used to do all of my VW race motor stuff and I was ALWAYS happy.

    Alan, thanks, I will call them as well. It is not all about price, but experience as well for me.

    I consider myself a CASO in that I always want the best deal I can get and do not have money to waste or just blow, but I am willing to pay a fair price for the best work possible. So maybe less of a CASO that a "deal conscious Stude owner". Or maybe a "DOSO"? Deal Oriented Stude Owner.

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  • Alan
    replied
    Kelly, There is a R&C Crank on 3400 E. Union Pacific in Los Angeles that does good work and is a CASO's best friend. Should cost about $90 to fix the crank. You would have to call them about prices on the rods. The # 1 and 2 rods are the last to get oil and they only get it on half the crank travel. Once the oil hole in the main gets to the un-groved half of the main bearing the oil to the rods is cut off.

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  • JoeHall
    replied
    Originally posted by kmac530 View Post
    According to my manual the #1 rod is the first rod to get oil, but I could be misunderstanding the path wrong. The manual says it goes up from the pump to the back of the right bank to the OP line first, then thru the rocker shaft, then down to the bypass/check valve, and then into the crank to front crank bearing and the #1 cylinder rod and so on....

    Bob, even when hot I had OP at 60 psi at 2500 rpm even once the rod torched the bearing in the cap side of the rod. I had 80 psi when I was priming the pump before original start up and maybe the first hour or 2 of break in, but after that it dropped to 60 psi at rpm and 25 ish at idle and still had around that up until I parked it with the bad clatter.

    PS: Does anyone in So Cal have a good machine shop that can resize rods, check and or straighten rods, turn cranks and is familiar with Stude motors? I want to find a machine shop with confidence.
    "Wayne's Engines" in Riverside was a great experience for me when living in SoCal in the 1980s-90s. Kinda like KFC, they just do engines, but they do them well. Of course I left there in 2000, so it may not even be t4here anymore, AFAIK.

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  • Roscomacaw
    replied
    Bud ought to be able to steer you to a worthy shop. But I'd bet the chapter down your way has favorites too.

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  • kmac530
    replied
    Oh yeah, btw, Thank you everyone for your help, input and concern.

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  • kmac530
    replied
    According to my manual the #1 rod is the first rod to get oil, but I could be misunderstanding the path wrong. The manual says it goes up from the pump to the back of the right bank to the OP line first, then thru the rocker shaft, then down to the bypass/check valve, and then into the crank to front crank bearing and the #1 cylinder rod and so on....

    Bob, even when hot I had OP at 60 psi at 2500 rpm even once the rod torched the bearing in the cap side of the rod. I had 80 psi when I was priming the pump before original start up and maybe the first hour or 2 of break in, but after that it dropped to 60 psi at rpm and 25 ish at idle and still had around that up until I parked it with the bad clatter.

    PS: Does anyone in So Cal have a good machine shop that can resize rods, check and or straighten rods, turn cranks and is familiar with Stude motors? I want to find a machine shop with confidence.

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  • rusty nut garage
    replied
    Critical to have the big ends of the rods resized, use american made inserts, just because you bought the previous inserts from SI (they sell stuff to make $ not necessarily to provide the hobby with the best product, I'm not being hard on them I' know its a business). FAIRBORN sell USA engine parts as does studebakerparts.com. while your at it make sure the rods are straight, and the connecting rod bolts and nuts are in good shape and use new pal nuts. The pinch bolt for the wrist pin is critical to be done right as it pressing on the timing gears and checking crankshaft end play. As Studebob states it just another internal combustion engine with a few querks. Be cautious on what corners you are willing to cut.
    Russ
    Originally posted by kmac530 View Post
    Almost as soon as I started my engine up a couple months ago it had a slight tick that sounded like it was in the bottom end. I had 60# of oil pressure and it ran like a champ, so after as much external diagnosis I could do, I assumed it was a pal nut or rod just touching the oil pan since I used the old style 232 pan when I rebuilt the motor. I figured if that is what it is it will not get any worse and maybe even wear itself down enough to stop.

    NOPE. I have been driving it and driving it hard for close about a month and a half now, everyday. I have ran 3 tanks of gas thru it and I have a 22 gal tank. I would say maybe close to 1000 miles since I got it together.

    Friday night I was on my way home from Temecula {20+ miles away} and doing about 60+ on the freeway { it is running so well I have even started driving it on the freeway when I have to} and all of a sudden this really bad clatter starts up. I thought it sounded like sheetmetal clattering. I looked at everything I could see in the dark and could not determine what it was. I limped it home and it seemed to run fine other than the clatter.

    Warren came over monday and we ran it around the block and even he could not get a fix on what it was. He thought maybe front trans bearing, but it did it even when the clutch was disengaged, so i didn't think that was it. Warren convinced me to try and pull the pan while the motor was in the truck and take a look.....here we are today.

    I finally had the time to pull the pan today, what a pain, and I see a piece of what looks like sheet metal sticking out fron between the #1 rod and the front counterweight of the crank...not sheet metal. There was NO bearing left on the rod cap, it was pounded into a paper thin sheet of metal and squeezed out of the rod.

    It looks like it cooked the crank as well. There is a LARGE ridge between the #1& #2 rod and it feels like it is worn too far to have turned.

    Anyone happen to have a good 289 crank and 2 rods?

    What could have caused this?

    I was VERY meticulous at cleaning out every galley and oil port in the crank and the block {or at least I THOUGHT I did} and I was very thorough at measuring everything and once they measure in spec I even plastigauged all of the bearing to make once last check that everything was good.
    It all checked out GREAT. I was very happy.

    I am worried now that if I do a crank and new rods and bearings that it could happen again if there is a clog in a galley somewhere I could not find....HELP.

    Thanks in advance
    Kelly

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  • Roscomacaw
    replied
    Don't be TOO hard on yourself. It IS just another reciprocating infernal combustion engine. They (Stude engines) DO have a few quirks unto themselves, but not as far as crank and bearings go. Probably the most vexing thing regarding the lower end is crankshaft end play (and I'm not hinting that was a factor in what's happened with Oscar's motor - just an observation ).

    I saw where you observed 60# oil pressure when it was initially started - what about when it was hot - what did the OP indicate then? Has it been dropping all along?

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  • kmac530
    replied
    That is what I am going to search out the most, that and the possibility that I just made a huge blunder....
    I am just really second guessing my skills right now. Dozens of bug and Chebby motors built successfully, raced successfully, many dozens of motorcyle and jet ski motors all built successfully and raced HARD for a long time each, top ends, bottom ends, gear boxes, 2 strokes, 4 strokes....all with confidence. One spun bearing on a motor I thought I had confidence in and POOF....doubts in my abilities all of a sudden.
    My Bi-polar disorder rearing its ugly head I guess.

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  • JoeHall
    replied
    Instead of inferior parts, I'd suspect the unresolved oil pressure issue, whatever it was caused by.

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  • kmac530
    replied
    All of my parts were from SI...I would think they sell good stuff.

    edit: All of my new internal engine parts were from SI. The engine was from Mr. K, befor I rebuilt it, and many other parts were from SNW. All reputable suppliers.
    Last edited by kmac530; 05-16-2012, 10:59 PM.

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  • jasontaub9
    replied
    I've heard rumors of inferior Chinese bearings out there, be sure to use quality parts.

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