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  • #31
    I hate this spell check. Meant to say reusing
    Dwayne Jacobson

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    • #32
      Originally posted by rrausch View Post
      Oh it'll work all right, but from what I've read it puts some really nasty poisonous chemicals into the water. What do you do with the water after you're through with it?
      I guess he does not want to answer that question.
      sigpic

      J&JW Machine Co.
      Bubbaland South
      Resident Machinist

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      • #33
        Originally posted by studebaker56j View Post
        I hate this spell check. Meant to say reusing
        Just go back and edit your original post. Click on edit post and change the two words that are wrong.
        "In the heart of Arkansas."
        Searcy, Arkansas
        1952 Commander 2 door. Really fine 259.
        1952 2R pickup

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        • #34
          Never really considered it a problem.
          I figured it was asked by an engineer splitting hairs...
          I have the unit outside.
          Nothing is dying or dead...


          Originally posted by JJWMACHINECO View Post
          I guess he does not want to answer that question.
          HTIH (Hope The Info Helps)

          Jeff


          Get your facts first, and then you can distort them as much as you please. Mark Twain



          Note: SDC# 070190 (and earlier...)

          Comment


          • #35
            Nope, I'm not an engineer. Grew up on a farm, had a little vacation courtesy of my Uncle Sam in 1970-71, and then worked in building trades (tile work, cabinetmaking, finish carpentry) a lot of my life, and now I'm moving back to the farm and building a house. I also put in a well on that property, and have become aware of how chemicals enter ground water and what they do when you drink them. As far as the stainless/spooge debate, enough guys have posted warnings about this on OWWM and several other Internet forums that I believe it. It makes sense that some nasty chems can come out of that stainless/spooge mix. But lets say I'm wrong...lets say it's PERFECTLY ok to spooge with a stainless anode---I use rebar, and a lot of other guys do too, and it's cheap. I have a pile of 2' sections left over from doing my foundation. So if I'm wrong there's no harm, no foul, no blood spilt, and I'm actually saving money. But lets say you're wrong, and some very poisonous materials are released into the water--first of all it probably won't hurt the grass or weeds, it would only hurt animals that drank water in the leach field of your tank. So whose well and what aquifers are getting your groundwater--I guarantee you somebody, someplace will eventually drink a little bit of everything you dump... septic tank, spooge tank, etc. etc. Call you County or City Utilities Supervisor or Code Enforcement Officer and ask out of curiosity what the dangers are.
            1953 Chev. 210 Convertible, 261 6cyl w/Offy dual intake (But I always did love Studebakers!)
            1995 Dodge/Cummins Pickup, 250 HP, 620 Ft. Lbs. of Torque, ATS trans.
            Robert Rausch

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            • #36
              Whatever the bi-product of the process is with SS, won't there be a chemical somewhere that can neutralize it or make it safer?
              Mike O'Handley, Cat Herder Third Class
              Kenmore, Washington
              hausdok@msn.com

              '58 Packard Hawk
              '05 Subaru Baja Turbo
              '71 Toyota Crown Coupe
              '69 Pontiac Firebird
              (What is it with me and discontinued/orphan cars?)

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              • #37
                You are right.
                I threw out the tank.

                Originally posted by rrausch View Post
                Nope, I'm not an engineer. Grew up on a farm, had a little vacation courtesy of my Uncle Sam in 1970-71, and then worked in building trades (tile work, cabinetmaking, finish carpentry) a lot of my life, and now I'm moving back to the farm and building a house. I also put in a well on that property, and have become aware of how chemicals enter ground water and what they do when you drink them. As far as the stainless/spooge debate, enough guys have posted warnings about this on OWWM and several other Internet forums that I believe it. It makes sense that some nasty chems can come out of that stainless/spooge mix. But lets say I'm wrong...lets say it's PERFECTLY ok to spooge with a stainless anode---I use rebar, and a lot of other guys do too, and it's cheap. I have a pile of 2' sections left over from doing my foundation. So if I'm wrong there's no harm, no foul, no blood spilt, and I'm actually saving money. But lets say you're wrong, and some very poisonous materials are released into the water--first of all it probably won't hurt the grass or weeds, it would only hurt animals that drank water in the leach field of your tank. So whose well and what aquifers are getting your groundwater--I guarantee you somebody, someplace will eventually drink a little bit of everything you dump... septic tank, spooge tank, etc. etc. Call you County or City Utilities Supervisor or Code Enforcement Officer and ask out of curiosity what the dangers are.
                HTIH (Hope The Info Helps)

                Jeff


                Get your facts first, and then you can distort them as much as you please. Mark Twain



                Note: SDC# 070190 (and earlier...)

                Comment


                • #38
                  That was a well made tank--nice welds--I hope you retrieve it and find another use for it. Thanks for listening to what I posted. Growing up on the farm, we used to dump used motor oil, used paint thinner, and all sorts of stuff that today just isn't very smart to dump. These days I use lacquer thinner a lot to clean greasy car/engine/tractor parts before painting them, and I always have some used lacquer thinner around. I let it sit until the solids sink to the bottom and then use a little bit of it to start fires when I burn tree limbs or paper trash. Used lacquer thinner isn't nearly as explosive as gasoline, and I've never had a problem... anyway, burning it is better than dumping it or taking it to a haz. waste facility I think. And it's easy to recycle used motor oil.
                  1953 Chev. 210 Convertible, 261 6cyl w/Offy dual intake (But I always did love Studebakers!)
                  1995 Dodge/Cummins Pickup, 250 HP, 620 Ft. Lbs. of Torque, ATS trans.
                  Robert Rausch

                  Comment


                  • #39
                    Ok


                    .......

                    Originally posted by rrausch View Post
                    that was a well made tank--nice welds--i hope you retrieve it and find another use for it. Thanks for listening to what i posted. Growing up on the farm, we used to dump used motor oil, used paint thinner, and all sorts of stuff that today just isn't very smart to dump. These days i use lacquer thinner a lot to clean greasy car/engine/tractor parts before painting them, and i always have some used lacquer thinner around. I let it sit until the solids sink to the bottom and then use a little bit of it to start fires when i burn tree limbs or paper trash. Used lacquer thinner isn't nearly as explosive as gasoline, and i've never had a problem... Anyway, burning it is better than dumping it or taking it to a haz. Waste facility i think. And it's easy to recycle used motor oil.
                    HTIH (Hope The Info Helps)

                    Jeff


                    Get your facts first, and then you can distort them as much as you please. Mark Twain



                    Note: SDC# 070190 (and earlier...)

                    Comment


                    • #40
                      Originally posted by Mrs K Corbin View Post
                      Has anyone tried a fender? or a hood? How well would this work on body metal? Thinking of my Transtar. Fender at a time.
                      I have seen videos online where people use vats of diluted sulphered molasses for large parts like fenders. No electric charge required. I have done the electrolytic method described here with mixed results.
                      \"Ahh, a bear in his natural habitat...a Studebaker!\"

                      51 Land Cruiser (Elsie)
                      Jim Mann
                      Victoria, B.C.
                      Canada

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