Announcement

Collapse

Get more Tips, Specs and Technical Data!

Did you know... this Forum is a service of the Studebaker Drivers Club? For more technical tips, specifications, history and tech data, visit the Tech Tips page at the SDC Homepage: www.studebakerdriversclub.com/tips.asp
See more
See less

I'm getting old/clumsy/dumb to be working on these things

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Engine: I'm getting old/clumsy/dumb to be working on these things

    I took apart the '64 Avanti to install the newly chromed Forrester valve covers (you have to just about disassemble an Avanti to take them off and reinstall). I decided to do some other work including installing new valve guide seals as the car was using oil with no particular leaks. I decided to try the "stuff rope in the cylinder" approach. After an hour of trying to feed a nylon rope in #3 (easiest to reach), I tried removing the valve spring only to find that the valves still dropped down 1/2 inch or so. I pulled out the rope, trudged up to my shop, got the compressor and spark plug adapter, then pulled the compressor 100 yards to the barn (on grass- little wheels, upright tank). Should have done that in the first place.

    I did the left side starting with #1. installed the spark plug adapter and connected the air hose- perfect. My big fear in the past has been dropping keepers as the spring compressed so I put a piece of heavy cloth between the engine and the inner fender (thumbnail 1). Solved that fear, but couldn't get around clumsy- had trouble reinstalling the keepers. Needle nose pliers helped. Pretty obvious that the seals were costing me oil (thumbnail 2- one new seal for comparison). Finished #1, #3,and #5 then managed to drop my spark plug adapter and the deep socket it was in. Of course they never fall cleanly to the floor. I could see them so I got my magnetic picker upper, snagged them and pulled up. Bumped the booster bracket and lost both where I couldn't see them. Jacked up the car and crawled under- still couldn't locate them. Let it down and finally noticed them lying on the frame rail. Picker-upper to the rescue. Did #7 and quit for the day. Brake booster bracket interfered with my screw-type valve spring compressor, but with some heavy swearing, finally got those seals changed.

    Now I dread starting the right side because there are so many other things in the way (heater hose, a/c hoses, etc,- thumbnail 3).
    Attached Files
    Paul Johnson, Wild and Wonderful West Virginia.
    '64 Daytona Wagonaire, '64 Avanti R-1, Museum R-4 engine, '72 Gravely Model 430 with Onan engine

  • #2
    I feel your pain.

    I use a pencil sized "magnet on a stick" to grab the keepers once the valve spring is compressed and to reinsert them.
    Dick Steinkamp
    Bellingham, WA

    Comment


    • #3
      Even when I built my motor on a stand in the garage I used a pencil magnet to pull the keepers and to reintall them. Putting the my magnet with the keeper on it down in place, then pushing it off the magnet with a non magnetic screw driver.

      Sure looks like your motor needed those new seals.

      Comment


      • #4
        To:53k,----- Pain in the ---, but well worth the trouble! -- Avanti!

        Comment


        • #5
          It's a fact that as we get older with diminished strength and flexibility, jobs become more of a challenge. Various lengths of pipe of various diameters have become my favourite tool accessory. Years ago, I made a tool based on a drawing published by Dick Datson, to hold the valve up in place firmly, while servicing valve seals etc. It has proven to be very useful and simple to use. If interested, I could post a photo. Along with this, I use a lever bar to compress the spring while removing the keepers.

          Comment


          • #6
            And we get taller.
            I know, because I keep hitting my head on stuff and carving my cranium up just for the fun of it

            Originally posted by WCP View Post
            It's a fact that as we get older with diminished strength and flexibility, jobs become more of a challenge.<snip>.
            HTIH (Hope The Info Helps)

            Jeff


            Get your facts first, and then you can distort them as much as you please. Mark Twain



            Note: SDC# 070190 (and earlier...)

            Comment


            • #7
              Welcome to my world.

              In case you haven't noticed, this does not get better with age. Remember to start with the most difficult to replace first but then you know that.

              Bob

              Comment


              • #8
                And they call these the golden years...more like living in fields of the GOLDENrod & I've just become extremely allergic...

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Marie Mac View Post
                  And they call these the golden years...more like living in fields of the GOLDENrod & I've just become extremely allergic...
                  Paul what would have done if it had been an R-2 nothing in the way there , hope Karen go some good pictures of you doing this one simple thing.
                  Candbstudebakers
                  Castro Valley,
                  California


                  Comment


                  • #10
                    How old is old? Maybe that's why it takes me twice as long to get half as much done. SO-- HOW OLD IS OLD ?

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Old is how ever old you feel that particular day. Most days now everyday is old!

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Perfect timing Paul. A while ago I did this job on my '57 wagon.. I had to fight with the power steering and power brake booster. Wasn't fun.

                        Next weekend I'll be doing this job on a friend's 35K mile '56 President Classic. No power equipment.. I'm actually looking forward to it! <g>

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Still, I'd much rather work on my Studebakers than on my GMC Duramax or worse, my wife's Honda Civic Hybrid. I opened the hood on her car last week for the first time since she got it in 2008 and decided there's nothing I care to mess with under there.....

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Wear fairly strong reading glasses and have plenty of light. I've found a little wheel bearing grease helps keep little parts from falling away. The magnet on a stick is essential, an angled dental mirror helps too. Go to a hot rod cruise and befriend some 20ish gear head and train him.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              I'd like to see this tool

                              Originally posted by WCP View Post
                              It's a fact that as we get older with diminished strength and flexibility, jobs become more of a challenge. Various lengths of pipe of various diameters have become my favourite tool accessory. Years ago, I made a tool based on a drawing published by Dick Datson, to hold the valve up in place firmly, while servicing valve seals etc. It has proven to be very useful and simple to use. If interested, I could post a photo. Along with this, I use a lever bar to compress the spring while removing the keepers.
                              Ron Dame
                              '63 Champ

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X