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A rookie shop question

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  • A rookie shop question

    OK, you guys and gals have me a little concerned.

    In my younger days, I restored/rebuilt/hopped up 7 Corvairs and I have done a lot of maintenance and repair on RVs and other types vehicles, but ...

    As I read the posts in this fora, i see pullers being modified with custom bolts heads, I see fuel pumps re-engineered with custom brass pins, and pictures of a lot of superior and very creative work. I am wondering what you guys see as a minimum (machine) shop. Turns out I have lots of tools from the Corvair days but I am lacking in the machine variety.

    What are your recommendations?? What do I really need for that car everyone was laughing at on Monday that I may get on eBay today??

    Mike

    Stiil looking

  • #2
    What are you trying to do? If it's a restoration I don't think you need anything other than normal mechanics tools and maybe a couple of special Studebaker tools (rear drum puller, harmonic balancer pusher).

    Jeff DeWitt
    Jeff DeWitt
    http://carolinastudes.net

    Comment


    • #3
      I couldn't live without a good drill press and tap and die set.

      nate

      --
      55 Commander Starlight
      http://members.cox.net/njnagel
      --
      55 Commander Starlight
      http://members.cox.net/njnagel

      Comment


      • #4
        Sorry.[][:I]

        Tom

        quote:Originally posted by MikeWay
        As I read the posts in this fora, i see pullers being modified with custom bolts heads, I see fuel pumps re-engineered with custom brass pins, and pictures of a lot of superior and very creative work.
        '63 Avanti, zinc plated drilled & slotted 03 Mustang Cobra 13" front disc/98 GT rear brakes, 03 Cobra 17" wheels, GM alt, 97 Z28 leather seats, soon: 97 Z28 T-56 6-spd, Ported heads w/SST full flow valves, 'R3' 276 cam, Edelbrock AFB Carb, GM HEI distributor, 8.8mm plug wires
        '63 Avanti R1, '03 Mustang Cobra 13" front disc/98 GT rear brakes, 03 Cobra 17" wheels, GM alt, 97 Z28 leather seats, TKO 5-spd, Ported heads w/SST full flow valves.
        Check out my disc brake adapters to install 1994-2004 Mustang disc brakes on your Studebaker!!
        http://forum.studebakerdriversclub.c...bracket-update
        I have also written many TECH how to articles, do a search for my Forum name to find them

        Comment


        • #5
          In Jeff's list of shop tools, I'd add a cylinder leak down tester. You can buy them reasonable now. Yes the compression guage tells you WHICH cylinder(s) is low, but the leak-down tester tells you WHY it's low. Just my thought.

          Dan Miller
          Atlanta, GA

          [img=left]http://static.flickr.com/57/228744729_7aff5f0118_m.jpg[/img=left]
          Road Racers turn left AND right.

          Comment


          • #6
            I could not live without my air tools or cutting torch. (for stubborn bolts)

            JDP/Maryland
            64 Daytona HT/R2 clone
            63 GT R2
            63 Lark 2 door
            62 Gt Hawk
            62 Lark 2 door
            60 Lark HT-60Hawk
            59 3E truck
            58 Starlight
            52 & 53 Starliner
            51 Commander

            JDP Maryland

            Comment


            • #7
              Stuff you should have in your shop to work on a Stude....
              Pretty good question.
              Split your list in two and separate maintenance/repair from restoration.
              Here's a stab at both area's....

              Maintenance/Repair
              * Stude Shop Manual
              * Good dwell/tach
              *Set back timing light
              *Vacuum gauge
              *Compression gauge
              *Spark plug gap tool
              *Feeler gauge set
              *point file
              *Voltmeter
              *test light
              *Stude specific hub puller
              *Brake spoon
              *Hydraulic jack
              *Jackstands
              *drain pan
              *Oil filter wrench
              *Steering wheel puller
              *Decent 50 gallon air compressor [u](NOT OILESS!!!)</u>
              *Air impact wrench set

              Restoration/Rebuilding
              *Mig welder (gas type)
              *Bodywork tools
              *Air bodywork tools
              *Paint tools

              There are more, but if this were my first Stude, I'd start at the top and work down.. Others will be sure to add some good idea's here too...
              Hope the info helps.
              Pic's are nice, but they won't get your Stude on the road.
              And pic's don't guarantee good work.
              Do the work first and take pic's later.
              Jeff[8D]




              quote:Originally posted by MikeWay

              OK, you guys and gals have me a little concerned.

              In my younger days, I restored/rebuilt/hopped up 7 Corvairs and I have done a lot of maintenance and repair on RVs and other types vehicles, but ...

              As I read the posts in this fora, i see pullers being modified with custom bolts heads, I see fuel pumps re-engineered with custom brass pins, and pictures of a lot of superior and very creative work. I am wondering what you guys see as a minimum (machine) shop. Turns out I have lots of tools from the Corvair days but I am lacking in the machine variety.

              What are your recommendations?? What do I really need for that car everyone was laughing at on Monday that I may get on eBay today??

              Mike

              Stiil looking
              HTIH (Hope The Info Helps)

              Jeff


              Get your facts first, and then you can distort them as much as you please. Mark Twain



              Note: SDC# 070190 (and earlier...)

              Comment


              • #8
                How does this happen[?][?][?] My clock says 4:58 (EST) any clues[?][?][?] How would I know what's on Jeff's list [?][?] Go figure.

                Dan(jumped time)Miller
                Atlanta, GA

                [img=left]http://static.flickr.com/57/228744729_7aff5f0118_m.jpg[/img=left]
                Road Racers turn left AND right.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Dan, no WONDER you kick butt at the track! You are there before the
                  rest of us can even post!

                  Tom
                  '63 Avanti R1, '03 Mustang Cobra 13" front disc/98 GT rear brakes, 03 Cobra 17" wheels, GM alt, 97 Z28 leather seats, TKO 5-spd, Ported heads w/SST full flow valves.
                  Check out my disc brake adapters to install 1994-2004 Mustang disc brakes on your Studebaker!!
                  http://forum.studebakerdriversclub.c...bracket-update
                  I have also written many TECH how to articles, do a search for my Forum name to find them

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Thanks for the replies. I seem to be pretty well equipped after all. Will probably aquire the bigger compressor and a mig? welder real soon now.

                    I am probably going to need them as I just won the auction on a '59 Regal 259/3sp/OD 2 dr hardtop about an hour ago. The price was right, don't know if anything else is. [?]

                    In fact, the very car was pictured on the general forum early last week.

                    Mike

                    Stiil looking

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Hmmm, you would probably do well to have some sockets (6 and 12 point, deep and shallow, 3/8" and 1/2" drive), rachets to match, a couple of extensions, a few screwdrivers, pliers, wire cutters, vice grips, a couple of hammers (including a BFH ), and some open and box end wrenches. If you plan on working on brakes, you will want a good tubing bender and flare tool and a hone if you want to rebuild wheel or master cylinders. As time goes you can pick up more specialized tools (brake line wrenches, ignition wrenches, etc.) but the above list should get you started.


                      Join me in removing narcissists, trolls, self annoited "experts" and general idiots via the Ignore button.

                      The official SDC Forum heel nipper ���

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                      Comment


                      • #12
                        The funny part for me is that no one mentions that your wrenches and sockets need to be standard and not metric. All the tools I've bought and used over the past 15 years were all metric. I've had to resupply myself with standard sizes since buying the car in '03.

                        ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                        Tom - Valrico, FL

                        1964 Studebaker Daytona - 289 4V, 4-Speed

                        Tom - Bradenton, FL

                        1964 Studebaker Daytona - 289 4V, 4-Speed (Cost To Date: $2514.10)
                        1964 Studebaker Commander - 170 1V, 3-Speed w/OD

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Ah, but a savvy mechanic will also realize that standard sizes become
                          metric over the years ... due to rust! Many times I have run into a
                          nut that is loose on the two standard sizes that I know it should be,
                          but a quick grab of a metric socket gives me a tight fit! Get both!

                          Tom

                          quote:Originally posted by Swifster

                          The funny part for me is that no one mentions that your wrenches and sockets need to be standard and not metric.
                          '63 Avanti R1, '03 Mustang Cobra 13" front disc/98 GT rear brakes, 03 Cobra 17" wheels, GM alt, 97 Z28 leather seats, TKO 5-spd, Ported heads w/SST full flow valves.
                          Check out my disc brake adapters to install 1994-2004 Mustang disc brakes on your Studebaker!!
                          http://forum.studebakerdriversclub.c...bracket-update
                          I have also written many TECH how to articles, do a search for my Forum name to find them

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            The two tools I have used most in working on my Lark have been PB Blaster and Simple Green!


                            [img=left]http://members.cox.net/clarknovak/lark.gif[/img=left]

                            Clark in San Diego
                            '63 F2/Lark Standard
                            http://studeblogger.blogspot.com

                            Clark in San Diego | '63 Standard (F2) "Barney" | http://studeblogger.blogspot.com

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Patience, Lots of it.....

                              63 Twin Supercharged Avanti
                              64 Avanti R3w/NOS
                              88LSC Avanti 350 Supercharged w/NOS

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