Announcement

Collapse

Get more Tips, Specs and Technical Data!

Did you know... this Forum is a service of the Studebaker Drivers Club? For more technical tips, specifications, history and tech data, visit the Tech Tips page at the SDC Homepage: www.studebakerdriversclub.com/tips.asp
See more
See less

Oil Bath or Paper air filter?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Oil Bath or Paper air filter?

    Dropping the newly rebuilt engine back in Kerrie's truck in the next couple of days. She drives the 1955 E7 as daily transport--it's a 1964 289 full flow replacement block that was in the truck when we bought it back in the 90's. It's equipped with a WCFB 4bbl and we've been using a paper element and housing from a Lark for all these years, but the truck came with a NOS oil bath cleaner that the former owner never installed and we still have it in the box it came in. I really like the vintage "look" of the oil bath and if it does as good a job filtering as the paper element, I'd really like to use it!

    What do you guys think? Is it practical for daily use? We're only a couple of weeks from getting the truck back on the road . . .

    Thanks for your input!

  • #2
    Allan,

    This is only a guess, but I suppose the oil-bath filter does a better job than a pleated paper air filter element. They need maintenance more often, so that could be why the shift to paper occurred. Part of the reason I think it probably does a better job is that K&N offers a high-end filter element (maybe there's one that will fit your wife's truck, I don't know) that is made of a cloth/fibrous material, and uses their own formulation to soak it with. They sell a special cleaner spray for it as well. If K&N considers it to be the best way to go, then the oil bath likely is more effective than paper.


    [img=left]http://rocketdillo.com/studebaker/misc/images/Avacar-hcsdc.gif[/img=left]DilloCrafter

    1955 1/2 Ton Pickup
    The Red-Headed Amazon
    Deep in the heart of Texas

    Paul Simpson
    "DilloCrafter"

    1955 1/2 Ton Pickup
    The Red-Headed Amazon
    Deep in the heart of Texas

    Comment


    • #3
      I run K&N filters in my bikes and what's interesting is that the oil used isn't petroleum based, but rather animal based (beef tallow I think).

      Comment


      • #4
        My first gut reaction to your question...
        Just stick a paper element air filter in there and drive it...
        An oil element may work better, but it does it at the expense of airflow and increased maintenance intervals, not to count disposal issues.
        Paper elements have come a long way in development as far as trapping of contaminants and airflow restriction.
        The perfect filter will trap everything, but won't last long. Everything is a tradeoff in one way or another.
        The K&N comment is interesting.
        Take a somewhat more porous material and sticky it up with lube to trap particulates, then wash it and re-use it.
        Best of both worlds, or worst of both worlds?
        Interesting question.
        Better question to ask is who makes their filters, and most of the filters out there?
        There are probably only a half dozen 'real' manufacturers in the USA...
        But my second reaction to your question is...
        Put the oil bath on there. It's a period piece and will give you good service....and you already have an OEM filter housing... Just remember that a quart of oil now is $3.50+ and you'll need to change it from time to time....
        Oh, and ignore the gurgle on shutdown... That's normal
        Jeff[8D]


        quote:Originally posted by Allan Songer

        Dropping the newly rebuilt engine back in Kerrie's truck in the next couple of days. She drives the 1955 E7 as daily transport--it's a 1964 289 full flow replacement block that was in the truck when we bought it back in the 90's. It's equipped with a WCFB 4bbl and we've been using a paper element and housing from a Lark for all these years, but the truck came with a NOS oil bath cleaner that the former owner never installed and we still have it in the box it came in. I really like the vintage "look" of the oil bath and if it does as good a job filtering as the paper element, I'd really like to use it!

        What do you guys think? Is it practical for daily use? We're only a couple of weeks from getting the truck back on the road . . .

        Thanks for your input!
        HTIH (Hope The Info Helps)

        Jeff


        Get your facts first, and then you can distort them as much as you please. Mark Twain



        Note: SDC# 070190 (and earlier...)

        Comment


        • #5
          Allan, I asked the same question here about six months back. Here's the thread; you might find it useful:

          http://www.studebakerdriversclub.com...earchTerms=air

          Can't wait to see pix of the truck!


          [img=left]http://members.cox.net/clarknovak/lark.gif[/img=left]

          Clark in San Diego
          '63 F2/Lark Standard
          http://studeblogger.blogspot.com

          Clark in San Diego | '63 Standard (F2) "Barney" | http://studeblogger.blogspot.com

          Comment


          • #6
            Thanks for your input, guys. I'm going to go ahead and install the oil bath and use it. Funny thing, even though this is NOS, the paint on it is TERRIBLE, a couple of pretty serious sags and runs. I know it's NOS because the part number is stamped in pale yellow and the inside is clean--never any oil. I feel sorta conflicted--I just cant use it in the ugly condition it came from the factory in! I am going to strip and paint it PROPERLY so that it looks as good as the rest of her truck!! So now I have to buy one of those reproduction stickers too!! Oh well . . . .

            Comment

            Working...
            X