Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

How hard is it to change the Master Cylinder and the Brake Cylinders?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Brakes: How hard is it to change the Master Cylinder and the Brake Cylinders?

    On a 65 Commander?
    1960 Lark VIII Regal Wagon


  • #2
    It is not that hard. use line wrenches, be careful not to strip any connections, use penetrating oil as needed, use only approved brake cleaners. If you are going to have it all apart perhaps you can clean the brake lines, brake cleaner and compressed air, check for rusted lines, clean all flared line ends. Keep all rust particles out of brake lines....keep it all clean read the manual before you start and as needed and you will be fine.
    Last edited by K-Hawk; 03-19-2012, 10:20 PM. Reason: had to stop before I was done

    Comment


    • #3
      The hardest part for most people is removing the rear drums (although late 65's have flanged axles making it easy) and bleeding the system afterwards. Don't forget to 'bench bleed' your master cylinder first.

      Joe
      sigpic

      1962 Daytona
      1964 Cruiser
      And a few others

      Comment


      • #4
        As someone who is finally bringing my brake project to a close, looking back.... yes, the slotted line wrenches are a must!!! And be carefull about how readily available the replacement parts are. When I started diassembling my 40 commander's brake system, there were a few parts that are not available easily. Be very careful not to strip them out when removing them.

        Comment


        • #5
          Take some pictures of the assembly as you disassemble it for reference as you put things back together.

          Comment


          • #6
            Thanks for all of the tips and info. Pictures will definitely be taken. This is a 65 with the Flanged Axles. Never heard of slotted Line Wrenches. Sounds like new tools are in my future
            1960 Lark VIII Regal Wagon

            Comment


            • #7
              If you buy line wrenches, don't get the cheapest ones you can find. This is one tool where it pays to go to the Snap-on guy or Mac, even Craftsman makes a pretty decent set. I bought a "bargain" set years ago and ended up ruining a brake fitting due to a poorly fitting wrench that sprung open a little while trying to remove a very stubborn fitting. I have had old cars in the past where I had to remove the cylinder with the line attached (disconnected the other end on the differental) so I could thread a box end wrench all the way down the line to the cylinder fitting. You are lucky to have flanged axles!

              Comment


              • #8
                Don't hesitate to replace the two front flex hoses, and the one rear. These have a bad habit of collapsing internally and will make the wheel cylinder, or rear brakes, not release. This condition is often not visible on the outside of the hose. Cheap insurance. Disassemble all wheel cylinders and look closely for rust pitting. Replacement cylinders are available if yours can't be rebuilt. Also consider installing DOT 5 fluid, it will not absorb moisture as will DOT 3. I've used it for many years without any problems. I flush the entire system with brake cleaner, then with compressed air, blow it dry. Hope this helps.

                Dan Miller
                Auburn, GA

                Comment


                • #9
                  Line wrenches look like this:



                  They're made so you can slip them over tubing and have more surface gripping the nut than a regular wrench gives you.

                  Clark in San Diego | '63 Standard (F2) "Barney" | http://studeblogger.blogspot.com

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Consider replacing your steel lines, too, not just the cylinders. It would be a shame if a rust spot you missed let go the first time major pressure was applied, leaving you rolling down a grade toward a stop sign. They aren't hard to do, you can find replacement lines, or using ready made lengths, make your own.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Get all your parts some cup cake pans to keep small parts in and a cookie sheet or 2 to keep wheel cylinder... on, perhaps lay a cloth down fits, Compare new and old parts clear every thing. It helps is hard to find, rent a pressure bleeder and follow the instructions, Bleed the furthermost wheel from the master cylinder first, then right rear left rear left front then lastly right front, check for leaks,if brakes are adjusted you will have a nice firm break pedal. Use correct brake fluid a nice dot 5, I don't like silicone.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        pack wheel bearings while it is apart good time for grease job 1 side at a time

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          finally at a point where I can start ordering the parts for this job. What is the difference going to be between the Stude Intl and Autozone shoes? There is a big price difference between the two. Ordering the new flex hoses for front and back today from Napa.
                          1960 Lark VIII Regal Wagon

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by cultural infidel View Post
                            finally at a point where I can start ordering the parts for this job. What is the difference going to be between the Stude Intl and Autozone shoes? There is a big price difference between the two. Ordering the new flex hoses for front and back today from Napa.
                            I bought all of my brake parts for the '57 wagon (I did a full rebuild) from rockauto.com. A fraction of the cost from other places.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Thanks for the tip Matt. The prices on there are great!

                              Brings another question regarding Brake Hoses: Is there 1 in the back or 2? I see a "center" hose offered and rear right/left offered. What was the standard on these cars? I would dive under mine but I am no where near it right now.
                              1960 Lark VIII Regal Wagon

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X