Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

How to solve a REALLY stuck clutch problem and bleed your brakes at the same time

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Clutch / Torque Converter: How to solve a REALLY stuck clutch problem and bleed your brakes at the same time

    The last couple days were somewhat productive on the '55. I decided to drain(yeah drain) out the old rear end fluid on the '55. The stock Dana 44 has a drain plug in the bottom of the rear end, which made removing and flushing the old fluid really easy. That was replaced with some 140W that I also use in the Lark, which as usual made for a really messy, stinky, and disgusting task.




    While I had the rear end in the air, I thought on a whim that I should see if I can get the engine to power the rear end. Well, we discovered that it would grind and then shift into 1st, not shift into 2nd or 3rd, and would get a sliding noise when it was thrown into Reverse. Reverse on the Foxcraft shifter put the ball into the instrument panel, so with a little bending, I was able to get it to engage reverse. The three forward gears however, in combination with a clutch pedal that went clear to the floor, told me that the NOS clutch I put in the car a couple years ago, had stuck to the flywheel. I got under the car and lengthened the adjustment rod that went to the pivot on the bellhousing, the one that goes to the throwout bearing, with little results. So, last night I went looking around the regular Studebaker forum site, and on the advice from the guys on the Racing Studebaker forum site, I went out today, jacked the rear end up, put it into 2nd, started the car, wound the car up, and jammed on the brake.

    Still no results, the clutch had not freed itself, even after 3-4 times. Even worse, the brake pedal had gotten really, really stiff, which meant the rear brakes had locked to the drum. That also made the car hard to start in gear. So I went to the bleeder screws, let out some of the fluid to relax the wheel cylinders, pressed the brake a few more times, and bled them again. I had got them to the point where the pedal wouldn't get hard anymore, so I continued with the clutch. I remembered that I lengthened the adjustment rod last night, and after getting under there and realizing that the throwout bearing needs to come forward past the point where it gets "solid" to disengage the clutch, I returned the adjustment rod length to it's stock position. Well, with a couple presses of the clutch pedal, I heard what sounded like a paper bag exploding under there, and I got resistance in the clutch pedal again. I went back under there, turned it a couple more times and called it good. While I had the front elevated, I broke out my one man brake bleeder, cracked open the bleeder screws, and gave the brake pedal a couple more pumps. I did the same thing to the rears, so now the brake pedal does not get hard anymore, nor is there any significant amount of air present in the lines to lock up the brakes. As an addendum, this did not reveal itself until the car had power to the wheels, that more bleeding needed to be done.
    This had an effect on the Megasquirt ECU, which immediately saw all this power from the engine, so when I turned it over, the engine decided to race! We couldn't have that, so that was a simple matter of turning down the idle air screw on the throttle body. By about this point, it was too dark to see anything so any photos will need to come later, or as they say "News footage at 11"....
    1964 Studebaker Commander R2 clone
    1963 Studebaker Daytona Hardtop with no engine or transmission
    1950 Studebaker 2R5 w/170 six cylinder and 3spd OD
    1955 Studebaker Commander Hardtop w/289 and 3spd OD and Megasquirt port fuel injection(among other things)

  • #2
    To: PlainBrownR2,----Nice to have that differential drain plug. I think it was eliminated by the time the Larks were introduced.

    Comment


    • #3
      What's funny is on the weekends, we'll shoot the breeze with our neighbor who collects GM's, Fords, and etc, and we'll get into discussions as to at what point in the 50's when the rear axle drain plugs actually disappeared. I can honestly say that Studebaker had them up until or past 1955 since this one is present on this vehicle.
      1964 Studebaker Commander R2 clone
      1963 Studebaker Daytona Hardtop with no engine or transmission
      1950 Studebaker 2R5 w/170 six cylinder and 3spd OD
      1955 Studebaker Commander Hardtop w/289 and 3spd OD and Megasquirt port fuel injection(among other things)

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by PlainBrownR2 View Post
        What's funny is on the weekends, we'll shoot the breeze with our neighbor who collects GM's, Fords, and etc, and we'll get into discussions as to at what point in the 50's when the rear axle drain plugs actually disappeared. I can honestly say that Studebaker had them up until or past 1955 since this one is present on this vehicle.
        The irony is that drain plugs have returned on a lot of late model GM 1/2 Ton trucks.
        --------------------------------------

        Sold my 1962; Studeless at the moment

        Borrowed Bams50's sigline here:

        "Do they all not, by mere virtue of having survived as relics of a bygone era, amass a level of respect perhaps not accorded to them when they were new?"

        Comment


        • #5
          a convenient way to free a disc that is stuck to the flywheel, if the car is on the ground, is to start the car in first gear with your foot on the clutch all the way to the floor. As soon as the engine starts the disc will immediatey break free
          1947 M5 under restoration
          a bunch of non-Stude stuff

          Comment


          • #6
            We did that with our Avanti last year when the clutch stuck. It was a simple matter of bumping the starter a couple times, and it was for a very mild case. However, in these instances where it wasn't coming free at all, and it involved a car with a fuel and ignition system that will start without delay when it's turned on, jacking the rear end in the air is probably the least riskiest procedures for freeing up the clutch. In all honesty, if it involves freeing up a mechanism that can cause the car to take off if its not secured or shut off, taking it off its driving wheels is the best thing to do.

            This vehicle is pointed at the back end of the garage, the front end of our trailer, and the back of house. If I can't get control over it, or shut it down quick enough, the car would end up damaging any of these structures, or finding its way into the neighbor's front yard, in any case I would then be asked "Well why didn't you use the jack or jackstands?".
            1964 Studebaker Commander R2 clone
            1963 Studebaker Daytona Hardtop with no engine or transmission
            1950 Studebaker 2R5 w/170 six cylinder and 3spd OD
            1955 Studebaker Commander Hardtop w/289 and 3spd OD and Megasquirt port fuel injection(among other things)

            Comment


            • #7
              I did the start-it-up-on-jackstands-and-stand-on-both-pedals procedure for an old Land Cruiser once after learning the trick from Paul Johnson. It worked well.

              Comment


              • #8
                umm i was thinking more like in a driveway, not inside a garage LOL
                done it at least 15 times
                1947 M5 under restoration
                a bunch of non-Stude stuff

                Comment


                • #9
                  umm i was thinking more like in a driveway, not inside a garage LOL
                  done it at least 15 times
                  Even better, park it in the driveway with the other cars and it'd take off at the garage door where the Avanti is parked, or one of the other cars(including other Studebakers) parked in my driveway. You also do know that this vehicle was pulled up and parked in that spot for the last couple of years and has not moved while I've been working on it, because of lack of space in the driveway or the garage. I also said it was pointed in the direction of the back of the garage, not in the garage. It doesn't matter how many times it's done, because it only takes once for a vehicle to take off into something else. Also, since this vehicle has a fuel and an electronic ignition system where it is all but almost absolute that it will start on the first pull, the responsible(oh dear lord not that word) thing to do is put it on jacks, so it won't happen.
                  1964 Studebaker Commander R2 clone
                  1963 Studebaker Daytona Hardtop with no engine or transmission
                  1950 Studebaker 2R5 w/170 six cylinder and 3spd OD
                  1955 Studebaker Commander Hardtop w/289 and 3spd OD and Megasquirt port fuel injection(among other things)

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    As promised, here are the results from yesterday....



                    It shifts great when it's out of overdrive, and it is rather responsive, and I got the speedo cable back in. We have to work on the fuel map for the upper end though, in 3rd gear and running like that it pulls great, but it winds out to about 65 mph..
                    1964 Studebaker Commander R2 clone
                    1963 Studebaker Daytona Hardtop with no engine or transmission
                    1950 Studebaker 2R5 w/170 six cylinder and 3spd OD
                    1955 Studebaker Commander Hardtop w/289 and 3spd OD and Megasquirt port fuel injection(among other things)

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I just drive it thru the neighbors fence....that frees up some perfectly good fencing for fire wood.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I just drive it thru the neighbors fence....that frees up some perfectly good fencing for fire wood.
                        Sorry, everybody uses electric or natural gas, you'll probably tear up your car going through the bailing wire, and you'll end up on your neighbor's bad side, because they think you're trying to get away with whatever you want to do, despite everybody staying friendly to each other and keeping to their business. Then there's the damage incurred from destroying the fence. There's a couple car guys here, but that's one fast way to get everybody angry at you.
                        1964 Studebaker Commander R2 clone
                        1963 Studebaker Daytona Hardtop with no engine or transmission
                        1950 Studebaker 2R5 w/170 six cylinder and 3spd OD
                        1955 Studebaker Commander Hardtop w/289 and 3spd OD and Megasquirt port fuel injection(among other things)

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          "In all honesty, if it involves freeing up a mechanism that can cause the car to take off if its not secured or shut off, taking it off its driving wheels is the best thing to do."
                          WoW

                          most cars have brakes
                          1947 M5 under restoration
                          a bunch of non-Stude stuff

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Wow, what a concept, using brakes to hold the car...... and if the brakes don't hold, or the engine has a few more ponies under the hood, it will simply overpower the brakes and take off anyway. I mean I apologize if basic common sense for doing really simple things to prevent a disaster is lost here, lol....
                            1964 Studebaker Commander R2 clone
                            1963 Studebaker Daytona Hardtop with no engine or transmission
                            1950 Studebaker 2R5 w/170 six cylinder and 3spd OD
                            1955 Studebaker Commander Hardtop w/289 and 3spd OD and Megasquirt port fuel injection(among other things)

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              I must be on the toyota forum and we are dealing with a stuck throttle
                              1947 M5 under restoration
                              a bunch of non-Stude stuff

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X