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What is mar glass?

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  • #31
    Soo what's the concensus on "LumaLead"? I used it in the rear fender on a GT, for some rather extensive repair back in 1992, and still can't find it under the paint.

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    • #32
      Originally posted by ST2DE5 View Post
      Where do we get these EXPERTS. How many body shop degrees do you have? You better study up on Dyna-Glas they patch boats with it. If anybody needs a degree see Bob Andrews
      So...now that we have slapped you around a bit...I would like to thank you for supplying this little "bolt of lightning" comment to really spark a great discussion. After all...we are car guys. People come and go here on the forum and this is a discussion that needs constant repeating for the benefit of those wanting to do some of their own body work.

      I don't know what caused you to post in a manner that could have been interpreted as offensive to some (although I think it was posted at about "happy hour" time for your part of the country.) Also, the exchange falls along the lines of what I consider the "Studebaker Personality." (Especially the edgy side
      ) The end result has been a good and informative conversation.

      This would be a good time for a good forum handshake. The resulting conversation has been very informative.
      John Clary
      Greer, SC

      SDC member since 1975

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      • #33
        Now hold on a minute! Dastardly Dick Datson said the ONLY way to fix a Stude floor was to fiberglass the whole thing!!!......And he knew eveything (even Atlantis)!!!
        Jamie McLeod
        Hope Mills, NC

        1963 Lark "Ugly Betty"
        1958 Commander "Christine"
        1964 Wagonaire "Louise"
        1955 Commander Sedan
        1964 Champ
        1960 Lark

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        • #34
          I did not take it as offensive. I just thought I would express where my opinions were from. I dont know that anyone has gotten hot here. I hope not. But then again I like lively discussions. All good here.

          {Hand out and shaking with a smile on my face}

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          • #35
            To kurtruk,------ Sorry about dragging You into that!.....I was referring to the Bob Andrews and bezhawk initial posts.

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            • #36
              Originally posted by SN-60 View Post
              To kurtruk,------ Sorry about dragging You into that!.....I was referring to the Bob Andrews and bezhawk initial posts.
              Mr. Capozzi, I didn't endorse using ANYTHING but stated what mar-glass actually is. I stated the best method is replacing metal with metal.

              Why the hostility towards others opinions?
              Every post is directed at trying to help an initial question, and should be ecouraged.
              Bez Auto Alchemy
              573-318-8948
              http://bezautoalchemy.com


              "Don't believe every internet quote" Abe Lincoln

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              • #37
                Originally posted by jclary View Post


                I don't know what caused you to post in a manner that could have been interpreted as offensive to some (although I think it was posted at about "happy hour" time for your part of the country.)
                I'm still wondering about this myself...
                Proud NON-CASO

                I do not prize the word "cheap." It is not a badge of honor...it is a symbol of despair. ~ William McKinley

                If it is decreed that I should go down, then let me go down linked with the truth - let me die in the advocacy of what is just and right.- Lincoln

                GOD BLESS AMERICA

                Ephesians 6:10-17
                Romans 15:13
                Deuteronomy 31:6
                Proverbs 28:1

                Illegitimi non carborundum

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                • #38
                  Lots of spirited, professional rant on this thread about the benefits of professional repairs with professional materials, but not much on LONGEVITY, which seems relevant. Being an amateur and CASO, I have used most of the stuff that has been ridiculed here over the past 27 years on Studes. I have found fiberglass will last 3 to 5 years before separation becomes an issue; kitty hair is good for 8-10 years; bondo is good for 10-15 years, and LumaLead is good for 20+ years. I am thinking "professional" repairs, with professional materials, as ranted about above, may last for maybe 30-50 years. Given our average age, who really cares about problems 10+ years from now ????
                  I plan to use kitty hair, bondo and LumaLead on the next bodywork & paint job on the GT, but that's just me. Maybe some others here are gonna live a lot longer than average life expectancy. I'm sure we all wanna live to be at least 100, but bodywork deterioration is probably not gonna be high on my list of concerns if I make it that far

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                  • #39
                    Joe Hall makes a good point. It really depends on what your skills and level of comfort is along with your goals for the vehicle. In 1988, I was invited to bring my GT Hawk to participate in the parade lap for the NASCAR Darlington race. At the time, I had planned on a quality restoration some time in the future. However, having a kid in middle school, starting a new job, and just living...was about all I could do at the time.

                    Although the Hawk looked pretty good at 50 feet, there was some rust bubbling up at the lower rear quarters. I banged off the big rust flakes, wire brushed, and ground off all the rust I could, and slapped some kitty hair in the quarter size hole. I smoothed and feathered the goop, rattle can splattered some gray primer and gloss black. At Darlington, it was one of the big hits of the parade. Later that year, it was used in a movie. A couple of weeks after the movie deal, I traded the car for a new heating and air system for my home plus more cash than I had paid for the car. Then...the guy that bought the car wrecked it two days after buying it from me. In that case...the best repair job in the world wouldn't have mattered.
                    John Clary
                    Greer, SC

                    SDC member since 1975

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                    • #40
                      Dear Mr. bezhawk,.... Time to reread the text! I agreed with Bob Andrews and Yourself on perhaps the best way to fix the problem that rbrunner asked about. The body shop He's dealing with suggests they grind down the rusty area, and put
                      mar-glass over it. I do not think this is the best way to achieve a long lasting repair.....and it sure sounded like You didn't either. I do not believe I was being 'hostile' to anyone. (except maybe that body shop)
                      Once again, I think You need to calm down and reread the posts. Have a nice day!

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                      • #41
                        Originally posted by JoeHall View Post
                        who really cares about problems 10+ years from now ????
                        I consider myself an amateur restorer but attempt to do the very best work I can. Based on past experience when I paid to have things done, the work I do now is better. I can drive them with a lot of pride, and hope I will still be doing so in ten years.
                        I have no doubt these Studes will be around long after I am gone, and someone yet unborn will be entranced by them, grateful that someone years prior bothered to care.
                        "All attempts to 'rise above the issue' are simply an excuse to avoid it profitably." --Dick Gregory

                        Brad Johnson, SDC since 1975, ASC since 1990
                        Pine Grove Mills, Pa.
                        '33 Rockne 10,
                        '51 Commander Starlight,
                        '53 Commander Starlight "Désirée",
                        '56 Sky Hawk

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                        • #42
                          rbruner, any updates on this??
                          Proud NON-CASO

                          I do not prize the word "cheap." It is not a badge of honor...it is a symbol of despair. ~ William McKinley

                          If it is decreed that I should go down, then let me go down linked with the truth - let me die in the advocacy of what is just and right.- Lincoln

                          GOD BLESS AMERICA

                          Ephesians 6:10-17
                          Romans 15:13
                          Deuteronomy 31:6
                          Proverbs 28:1

                          Illegitimi non carborundum

                          Comment


                          • #43
                            It should be a sturdy repair , Cause thats where your gonna be setting your 2x6s when at the lumber yard . .

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                            • #44
                              GREAT point aarrggh.
                              A quick, somewhat temporary fix at the bottom edge of a rusty fender corner is one thing, I still would not do it on any restoration, maybe a cheapy last resort quick fix, but not on anything structural like a trunk lid hinge area, tailgate, doors...anywhere with movement and loads.

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                              • #45
                                I used a fiberglass patch to repair a hole in a wheel well. Apparently a tire chain (or something) got loose and knocked a silver dollar size hole in the metal. I trimmed out the rough edges. I then stripped the paint about 1/2" around the hole - on both sides. I cut one piece to fit the hole itself. I cut two pieces to fit the size I had stripped the paint back too. I then sandwiched the three pieces together with resin. I likely put a few coats of resin on. Afterwards I painted the weather side of the wheel well and then applied undercoat from a can. I had this car 10 years, stripped it to the bone at the end of its life and never had any rust issues with this repair. Likely it helped that the repair didn't have to be "feather" sanded like an exposed body panel, but still the fiberglass held up, didn't work loose or rust. I think a lot of fiberglass repairs go bad from poor prep or use on panels that flex a lot.

                                I also used the fiberglass impregnated Bondo to repair some small rust holes in the roof of a Datsun 510. 8 years later the repair is holding and not rusting. And, that car was only painted with OSH $2.49 a can flat black paint (about 12 cans). I also have used flat, replacement steel with pop rivets on floors. I prepped (drilled holes - FIRST ,removed rust, painted and then silicone caulked the patch into a whole section of a Volvo 544. 15 years later the repair was "drum" tight and showing no signs of rust.

                                Again, I think it is all about knowing the limits of the product and proper preparation. I realize there are professional repairs that are a skill and some people are willing to pay for that. However, for the individual enthusiast other methods can work to great satisfaction. I remember years ago my wife came home from the dentist stating she needed a $250 bit guard to protect her from grinding her teeth at night. A trip to K-Mart and a $1.50 athletic mouth guard (properly trimmed - again it's all about the prep) solved the problem.

                                Tom
                                Last edited by wittsend; 03-12-2012, 05:00 PM.
                                '64 Lark Type, powered by '85 Corvette L-98 (carburetor), 700R4, - CASO to the Max.

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