Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

1954 C/K Brakes Question

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Brakes: 1954 C/K Brakes Question

    Does the 1954 C/K use separate drums and hubs in the front? In other words, can I separate the wheel hub from the drum and use my own rotors and hats? If anyone can point me to a parts diagram that would be great!

  • #2
    As far as I know all Brake drums can have the swages on the Studs cut off, the studs removed and the hub installed in a new drum.
    Certainly all Studebaker drums and hubs are that way. Studebaker sold the Drums separately to allow that, so as not to "waste" the Hubs and lower the cost.

    Of course to install Disc. Brakes you do not have to reinvent the Wheel so to speak.

    A long time SDC & Forum Member Jim Turner, makes a kit way better than you can fabricate one that way.

    Here is the link from the studebakervendors.com website.

    http://www.turnerbrake.com/
    Last edited by StudeRich; 03-07-2012, 08:40 AM.
    StudeRich
    Second Generation Stude Driver,
    Proud '54 Starliner Owner

    Comment


    • #3
      Yes you can use Mustang rotors....even drilled and slotted 13" Cobra brakes if you want to. However you need to turn the outside diameter of the hub to fit into the rotor. The conversion is shown in Bob Johnstones website.

      www.studebaker-info.org
      Bez Auto Alchemy
      573-318-8948
      http://bezautoalchemy.com


      "Don't believe every internet quote" Abe Lincoln

      Comment


      • #4
        13" Cobra brakes are cute, but I have something more serious in mind. Thanks for your help!

        Comment


        • #5
          Lol! you must be going Road Racing! A sensably driven street car cannot use any more brake than the Turner setup.
          StudeRich
          Second Generation Stude Driver,
          Proud '54 Starliner Owner

          Comment


          • #6
            "Lol! you must be going Road Racing! A sensably driven street car cannot use any more brake than the Turner setup."

            BINGO Rich!

            My "first" kit used the 68 -69 Mustang calipers, way too much brake for my Avanti!!! Using the Wilwood calipers and those rotors, I sure hope you have a good seat belt system! As you will get up close and personal with youe windsheild!!! LOL


            Jim
            "We can't all be Heroes, Some us just need to stand on the curb and clap as they go by" Will Rogers

            We will provide the curb for you to stand on and clap!


            Indy Honor Flight www.IndyHonorFlight.org

            As of Veterans Day 2017, IHF has flown 2,450 WWII, Korean, and Vietnam Veterans to Washington DC at NO charge! to see
            their Memorials!

            Comment


            • #7
              I've got way too much motor to match my way too much brakes. The nice thing is these will all fit under a 15" wheel, adds to the sleeper factor!

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by StudeRich View Post
                Lol! you must be going Road Racing! A sensably driven street car cannot use any more brake than the Turner setup.
                You can never have "too much brake". The Turner setup, still using drums in the rear, won't give the stopping power the higher-powered cars need.
                '53 Commander
                Art Morrison chassis
                LS6 ASA/4L60E

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by ralt12 View Post
                  You can never have "too much brake". The Turner setup, still using drums in the rear, won't give the stopping power the higher-powered cars need.
                  "Too much" probably doesn't hurt any, but what is "enough"? Where do the cost vs benefit lines of the graph cross?

                  Here's my opinion.

                  You have "enough" brake when you can slide the tires at the maximum speed you will probably travel. This assumes proper front to rear proportioning so that the car won't change ends under heavy braking. Not only is speed a factor, but also the width of the tires on the car. It is harder to slide a wide tire than a narrow one. The stopping distance becomes the driver's ability to modulate braking force to be JUST PRIOR to lock up.

                  On a typical street Studebaker, it means stopping from maybe 90-100 MPH. From experience, I know that 54 and up self energizing stock drum brakes are properly apportioned front to rear and will slide 215 75 15's rear and 205 70 15's front with repeated stops from 95 MPH. At this speed, with these tires, it is my opinion that bigger, more powerful brakes will not stop the car in a shorter distance. Once you have "enough" brake to slide the tires, MORE brake will not decrease the stopping distance.

                  If you have wider tires and/or will be stopping from higher speeds, you MAY need more brake (I don't know the tire size/speed limit on stock 54 and up Studebaker brakes).

                  If you will be stopping with the brakes immersed in water OR repeated stops in quick succession from high speeds (road racing), disc brakes work much better than drum brakes. Stock Studes are rarely in these situations, however.

                  If you are concerned about unsprung weight, disc brakes are lighter than drum brakes.

                  IMHO, bigger isn't better. It's just bigger (unless you are planning some serious speed and big meats....then, go for it!)
                  Dick Steinkamp
                  Bellingham, WA

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I like the heat paint AND thermometers on those brake parts!

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Dick Steinkamp View Post
                      "
                      IMHO, bigger isn't better. It's just bigger (unless you are planning some serious speed and big meats....then, go for it!)
                      That's the program. 275's are about the biggest that will fit in the back without a minitub, and 255's in the front.
                      '53 Commander
                      Art Morrison chassis
                      LS6 ASA/4L60E

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Speaking from first hand experience, Jim Turner's kit is on the Challenger pictured here. This was done back in 1984 and this was the best upgrade to the "factory" 11" finned front drums, with specially made full metallic, segmented shoes. You would not believe the difference in the stopping power. If it will work on the track, it should be more than enough for the street.

                        Dan Miller
                        Auburn, GA

                        Comment

                        Working...
                        X