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Wagonaire Sliding Roof Seal...what to use?

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  • Body: Wagonaire Sliding Roof Seal...what to use?

    What has been used (successfully) for the seals on the sliding roof of a Wagonaire?
    Dick Steinkamp
    Bellingham, WA

  • #2
    The Studebaker engineers wondered the same thing!!!!!

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    • #3
      Originally posted by SN-60 View Post
      The Studebaker engineers wondered the same thing!!!!!
      Bwahahahahaha, great answer. ;-)
      Matt
      Brisbane
      Australia
      sigpic

      Visit my Blog: http://www.mattsoilyrag.blogspot.com.au/

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      • #4
        I have a vague recollection of a detailed article (Turning Wheels, here on the forum?) of a successful fix. I'm sure someone will remember where that was.
        Don Wilson, Centralia, WA

        40 Champion 4 door*
        50 Champion 2 door*
        53 Commander K Auto*
        53 Commander K overdrive*
        55 President Speedster
        62 GT 4Speed*
        63 Avanti R1*
        64 Champ 1/2 ton

        * Formerly owned

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        • #5
          I have always wondered whether you could consider it as a large electric sunroof??? Surely, the folks who make/install those would have a suggestion as to what they'd use if they had designed them.
          John Clements
          Christchurch, New Zealand

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          • #6
            Dick
            When I did my '64 wagon I got the rubber from Restoration Supplies in Windber,PA. I believe the part # was 4144. Hope this helps.

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            • #7
              Don't recall where I read it but there is a detailed article in existance on this. Seems to me the gist was that its not supposed to be water tight in the slides. The problem was the drainage system was not well engineered and cannot drain water out as fast as it can come in so overflows into the car.

              Jeff in ND

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              • #8
                Originally posted by stude1964 View Post
                Dick
                When I did my '64 wagon I got the rubber from Restoration Supplies in Windber,PA. I believe the part # was 4144. Hope this helps.
                Thanks, Robin. They sure have a bunch of stuff! I couldn't find 4144 in their catalog, but I've emailed them to see if they have a recommendation.
                Dick Steinkamp
                Bellingham, WA

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Jeff_H View Post
                  Don't recall where I read it but there is a detailed article in existance on this. Seems to me the gist was that its not supposed to be water tight in the slides. The problem was the drainage system was not well engineered and cannot drain water out as fast as it can come in so overflows into the car.
                  Yes, Jeff, the water that would get in goes in the same channel that the slider rollers run it. At both ends of the channels are drain tubes that take the water out to the bottom of the car. The tubes are rather small (1/4"?) so could get overwhelmed...plus if a tube gets blocked, the water would end up in your lap on a sudden stop.

                  There is no DIRECT way for water to enter the roof since the trim and fixed portions of the roof overhang the slider, but I can see that washing the car and flooding the roof with water could put a lot of water into the channels without some sort of seal.

                  When you turn the locking handle with the roof closed, it not only locks the slider, but also raises it slightly (1/4"?). The weather seal would then be "squished" between the slider and the fixed portions of the roof. The seal has to be a pretty precise thickness in order to let the slider slide, but to then form a seal with the handle locked.
                  Dick Steinkamp
                  Bellingham, WA

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    The proper weatherseals are available from Studebaker International. You will want 1 - 1361471 Weatherseal, Front & Sides, which is an improved design over the original 1351634. Also, order 1 - 1353898 Seal, Corner - Right and 1 - 1353899 Seal, Corner - Left. The sliding roof feature is actually very sturdy, well engineered, and easy to use. All the discussion about leaking means just one thing - and that is weatherseals get old, whether on doors, trunks, or sliding roofs! When I was a college student I used to work part-time for Courtesy Motors Studebaker in Corvallis, OR and one of my specialties was installing the new and improved weatherseal in Wagonaires that were then just a few years old. I tested each car with a blast from a water hose and they did not leak! It is useful to have Service Letter F-1963-1, titled "WATER LEAK CORRECTIONS - WAGONAIRE MODELS." I recall there was also a service letter that superceeded this one, but I don't have a copy of it.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Studebakercenteroforegon View Post
                      The proper weatherseals are available from Studebaker International. You will want 1 - 1361471 Weatherseal, Front & Sides, which is an improved design over the original 1351634. Also, order 1 - 1353898 Seal, Corner - Right and 1 - 1353899 Seal, Corner - Left. The sliding roof feature is actually very sturdy, well engineered, and easy to use. All the discussion about leaking means just one thing - and that is weatherseals get old, whether on doors, trunks, or sliding roofs! When I was a college student I used to work part-time for Courtesy Motors Studebaker in Corvallis, OR and one of my specialties was installing the new and improved weatherseal in Wagonaires that were then just a few years old. I tested each car with a blast from a water hose and they did not leak! It is useful to have Service Letter F-1963-1, titled "WATER LEAK CORRECTIONS - WAGONAIRE MODELS." I recall there was also a service letter that superceeded this one, but I don't have a copy of it.
                      The seals on my Wagonaire didn't leak (where the interior got wet) for a long time. What seepage did come in was handled by the drains. However, the car was hit in the right rear quarter one time and the repair closed the drain in the bottom of the quarter panel. Later, as I drove I kept hearing a sloshing sound. Eventually the rear carpet was wet. I pulled the inner panel and the rear quarter was standing full of water. I opened the drain like you would the bottoms of the doors and the problem went away. However, later in life the leaks did start. One time there was enough water in the left channel that when I stopped suddenly, I got a bath.
                      Paul Johnson, Wild and Wonderful West Virginia.
                      '64 Daytona Wagonaire, '64 Avanti R-1, Museum R-4 engine, '72 Gravely Model 430 with Onan engine

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                      • #12
                        Is there a way to increase the size of the drain tubes?
                        As a pipe fitter for many years I learned that even small increases in pipe diameter actually move alot more fluid. There is an exponential factor because of the round shape. IE 4 tubes 1" in diameter do not flow anywhere near the same as 1 tube 4" in diameter.
                        So increasing the drainage tubing to even 3/8" would move alot more water and possibly help the situation. Keeping water out as much as possible would be a good thing, but getting rid of what does make its way in would also be a good thing. Might stop the unwanted showers.

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                        • #13
                          The drain tubes are not the issue. Yes, they should be checked to be sure they are open, but if the roof weatherseal is functioning, no or very little water will be in the tracks. I myself drove a '63 Daytona Wagonaire on a daily basis in the early 1970's. And, yes, when I first got it, I did get a wet left shoulder on more than one occasion. But I of course installed the new weatherseal and it did not leak for as long as I owned it.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Studebakercenteroforegon View Post
                            The proper weatherseals are available from Studebaker International. You will want 1 - 1361471 Weatherseal, Front & Sides, which is an improved design over the original 1351634. Also, order 1 - 1353898 Seal, Corner - Right and 1 - 1353899 Seal, Corner - Left. The sliding roof feature is actually very sturdy, well engineered, and easy to use. All the discussion about leaking means just one thing - and that is weatherseals get old, whether on doors, trunks, or sliding roofs! When I was a college student I used to work part-time for Courtesy Motors Studebaker in Corvallis, OR and one of my specialties was installing the new and improved weatherseal in Wagonaires that were then just a few years old. I tested each car with a blast from a water hose and they did not leak! It is useful to have Service Letter F-1963-1, titled "WATER LEAK CORRECTIONS - WAGONAIRE MODELS." I recall there was also a service letter that superceeded this one, but I don't have a copy of it.
                            What would be a source of that/those particular service letters? Anyone able to direct me??

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              If the drain tubes get clogged, the roof channels fill with water (and tree debris) very rapidly. Of course that isn't a problem in a dry climate like Bellingham!

                              Studebaker engineers, in their infinite wisdom, terminated the forward drain tubes inside the rocker panels at the front, and inside the rear quarter panels at the rear. Just what the body needs, eh, a whole more water dumped inside closed spaces with little or no rust-proofing?

                              You can make it more better. Use a step drill or hole saw to make a 3/4" hole in the inward-facing vertical panel to which the rocker panels are welded, and drill similar holes near the rear of the rear inner rocker panels. The holes are best located as high on the panel as you can conveniently reach.

                              Use a piece of mechanic's wire bent into a J-hook to fish around and snag the drain hoses, and drag them out through the holes. A 3/4" hole would allow room for a small lamp if you think it will help.

                              Trim the burrs off the holes, paint the bare metal with rust pain, and finish the job by slipping a suitable rubber grommet up over the hose, and snap it into the panel.

                              If a hose is clogged, have a helper hold a rag over the upper drain opening, and apply gentle air pressure to the bottom end. Too much air pressure might force the upper end of the hose off the nipple in the channel, and getting it back on could be difficult. The hose has no fabric reinforcement, so it is stretchy.

                              If you get the drains working well, you can better tolerate a few leaks in the weatherseal on the slider. and doing this job will help preserve the lower structure of the body.
                              Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands

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