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Bad idea? Possible c/k front suspension

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    I second the idea of TXmark in trying the Grand Am steering rack, here is a link to what others have done. (Non-Stude): http://bloom.is-s.com/~ranchero/tech...n-Pinion.shtml

    This rack has been on the back burner for some time but I have too many other things to finish first. I just can't see people struggle without trying all the options. I'm not saying it will work just that it needs to be looked at before trying anything drastic. Len.

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  • hausdok
    replied
    Has anyone tried salvaging the electric rack and pinion power steering setup out of a late model car and mounting it on a Stude yet?

    Something like this maybe: http://www.zf-lenksysteme.com/en/pro...volectric.html
    Last edited by hausdok; 11-29-2012, 06:22 AM.

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  • studebakerkid
    replied
    See the post on the 66 wagon. All you need is a flange and then you can weld up the left side exaust manifold and put the exit port where you need it and use a 65-66 style Gm power steering pump. with some custom lines with the Stude power steering center link. I have one of those from a 65 just sitting in my parts pile a probably do some others.

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  • jrlemke
    replied
    Remember, you can usually swap exhaust manifolds side for side to correct clearance problems. I put a '56 Buick motor into a '52 Chev. and used a '59 L.H. sgl. exh. on the right side and a '58 L.H. dual exh. on the left. No more problems!

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  • Green 53
    replied
    My 53 has a Nova subframe that I am quite happy with. There is nothing wrong with a standard Studebaker front. The Avanti's and Lark types that I have had drove just fine.

    Denny L

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  • junior
    replied
    Sweet looking car...and interior shots? Thanks, Junior

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  • bob1940cab
    replied
    Went with mustang 2.
    Bob
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  • TXmark
    replied
    Bob,
    check out a rack from a '96 pontiac Grand Am it is as close as you will get to a bolt on rack

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  • Alan
    replied
    Remove those mounts from the frame and pick up some fresh ones from a swap meet or SI. Build some new mounts for the SBC at the block. Once set in with the proper offset to the right it will give you more clearance at the steering.

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  • junior
    replied
    Thanks for posting the photos. I will not laugh, as your car doesn`t look all that dirty. I can see why you want to get rid of the system you have. I think I would at least try a stock rams horn on the drivers side to see if if fits, and if it does just go with that a a true dual system. I guess there is nothing really wrong with what you have, as many cars came from the factory this way, just looks awkward, and not taking advantage of all the power the engine is capable of making. Keep us posted on what you come up with, good luck, Junior.

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  • bob1940cab
    replied
    Originally posted by junior View Post
    If you can figure out an effective ps unit for the C/K Studes then go for it, and I'm sure many folks will follow suit and copy what you've figured out. In the mean time, I'm not too sure of your exact engine location and mount system, but my 54 coupe had a SBC and turbo 350 combination and used a standard straight outlet rams horn manifold set up. Granted, it doesn't use standard sidemounts, but there is clearance around the steering box, which is a saginaw, not ross box. With a stock sized steering wheel and 215 section front tires the steering is a little heavy at parking lot speeds, but once on the road the effort lightens up considerably. Why not try thi[ATTACH=CONFIG]14019[/ATTACH]s setup and see what it's like, and then figure out a ps setup if you figure you still need it. Good luck, and hopefully you can get r[ATTACH=CONFIG]14018[/ATTACH]id of that dreadful present driver's side set up you have right now....If you can share some photos of it that would be great as an ex[ATTACH=CONFIG]14017[/ATTACH]ample of what not to do. Regards, Junior
    UPDATE & HOW NOT TO DO AN EXHAUST
    Another reason for change is yes I have the ROSS bClick image for larger version

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    Bob in Montgomery Texas
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  • junior
    replied
    If you can figure out an effective ps unit for the C/K Studes then go for it, and I'm sure many folks will follow suit and copy what you've figured out. In the mean time, I'm not too sure of your exact engine location and mount system, but my 54 coupe had a SBC and turbo 350 combination and used a standard straight outlet rams horn manifold set up. Granted, it doesn't use standard sidemounts, but there is clearance around the steering box, which is a saginaw, not ross box. With a stock sized steering wheel and 215 section front tires the steering is a little heavy at parking lot speeds, but once on the road the effort lightens up considerably. Why not try this setup and see what it's like, and then figure out a ps setup if you figure you still need it. Good luck, and hopefully you can get rid of that dreadful present driver's side set up you have right now....If you can share some photos of it that would be great as an example of what not to do. Regards, Junior
    Attached Files

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  • Dick Steinkamp
    replied
    Originally posted by bob1940cab View Post
    To all,

    Still cannot believe D Steinkamp sold that great car.
    Actually, I can't believe why anyone would KEEP one. Once you have the fun of finding one, networking for parts, and building it, then you take it to a car show and sit behind it in a lawn chair and have people talk to you about how they had one just like it...except it was a Rambler.

    I like the first three things about the hobby better than the fourth.

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  • bob1940cab
    replied
    Originally posted by Dick Steinkamp View Post
    If the engine is already installed in the car, you may have trouble finding a stock, cast manifold to work with the stock steering. If you haven't installed the engine yet, you can probably play with front to rear and side to side placement to get one to fit. It is tight on that side for sure.

    I had a 327 in my 53 hardtop. My goal on engine placement was to have the 4 speed shifter end up in the best position, AND to be able to run the stock fan shroud and an engine driven fan.



    To accomplish this, there was no way I could fit a stock exhaust manifold where the engine would end up in the chassis. I kept the stock steering, but even with the block huggers I had to drop the steering column at the frame mount a half an inch, move it back a half an inch, and lengthen the reach rod. I also shortened the stock column 2" to get the steering wheel out of my face.

    I like your steering concept, but I would personally not go through that work JUST to fit a stock exhaust manifold (I'm lazy!). Rebuilt stock suspension and steering actually works quite nice.
    To all,
    Having power steering & a Ram horn manifolds are the reasons for looking at this change. We are pulling the 327 & powerglide out next week. Changing to a 350 turbo. At present mine is a mess. The driver side has a cast manifold that dumps out at front to clear steering.
    The pipe goes down turns underneath & across under the balancer , turns back down passenger side (no mech fuel pump) where the pass ram horn T's straight down into pipe. The remainder of exhaust travels along the pass side to finish as a single exhaust. I have got to get rid of this mess. We are doing something & will let you know.
    Still cannot believe D Steinkamp sold that great car.
    Later, Bob im Montgomery, Texas.

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  • Dick Steinkamp
    replied
    If the engine is already installed in the car, you may have trouble finding a stock, cast manifold to work with the stock steering. If you haven't installed the engine yet, you can probably play with front to rear and side to side placement to get one to fit. It is tight on that side for sure.

    I had a 327 in my 53 hardtop. My goal on engine placement was to have the 4 speed shifter end up in the best position, AND to be able to run the stock fan shroud and an engine driven fan.



    To accomplish this, there was no way I could fit a stock exhaust manifold where the engine would end up in the chassis. I kept the stock steering, but even with the block huggers I had to drop the steering column at the frame mount a half an inch, move it back a half an inch, and lengthen the reach rod. I also shortened the stock column 2" to get the steering wheel out of my face.

    I like your steering concept, but I would personally not go through that work JUST to fit a stock exhaust manifold (I'm lazy!). Rebuilt stock suspension and steering actually works quite nice.

    Leave a comment:

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