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Cork pan gasket ???

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  • Engine: Cork pan gasket ???

    On the oil gasket set the front and rear cork pieces seem a bit too long. I assume you trim them to fit?
    OR, Do you use the pan to compress them into place?

    If you trim them, is there a trick to doing it properly-easily?

    Help

  • #2
    The manual says not to trim them. Soaking them in water helps to soften them up for installation.
    Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands

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    • #3
      Not to be a contrarian, but I have coated mine with Permatex Black, and they seem to install slightly easier.

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      • #4
        So they do compress even though they seem to be at least 1/4" too long?
        The rear one will fit on top of the groove and touch down on the block and that is not even pushed down into the groove which will substantially shorten the arc.

        I am not sure about water, I get the softening value, but that could cause swelling and I am already feeling too big. I am planning on using a Yamaha Black silicone. It is 20 bucks a tube and WAY better than the permatex black. It not as oily feeling and more of a rubber feel to it. I use it on all motorcycle engine stuff for bikes and it is unbelievable. Very pricey, but I have never had a failure or a slipping out of a gasket or anything. Its biggest issue is it does dry kind of fast so you gotta work quick. On a big area like an oil pan gasket and timing gear cover all at once is kind of tough with one pair of hands...

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        • #5
          They'll fit and will compress,but never cut them !
          Joseph R. Zeiger

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          • #6
            There is a guy that comes around with a 70's era Harley, and the thing is held together with Permatex Black. He even carries a tube of it with him at all times. When the thing breaks down he just dopes up the parts on the side of the road and drives off. That is why I have gotten hooked on that stuff. I haven't had it fail either, come to think of it.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by 63t-cab View Post
              They'll fit and will compress,but never cut them !
              Please don't tell anyone, but I cut mine just a wee bit

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              • #8
                I've never had to cut the end pieces. My pet process is to soak the end pieces in water, and then use light spring clamps to attached the pieces to the front and rear curved sections of the oil pan. Let them sit for a couple of days to help acquire a 'curved set' to them. When you install them, use your favorite sealer on them. Cut the heads off four long bolts and screw them into the block at the four corners to use as guides. Tighten the pan bolts slowly until it is fully down. I'll usually let it sit overnight forthe sealer (I use old style Permatex Aviation Form-a-Gasket) to set up, then torque the faseners to spec.
                Last edited by r1lark; 02-25-2012, 03:07 PM. Reason: spellin'
                Paul
                Winston-Salem, NC
                Visit The Studebaker Skytop Registry website at: www.studebakerskytop.com

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                • #9
                  The grey-ish black silicone in a cheeze whiz can.....called ther Right Stuff.....is the best stuff I have ever found for gasket sealant.
                  Gas and oil resistant.
                  Bez Auto Alchemy
                  573-318-8948
                  http://bezautoalchemy.com


                  "Don't believe every internet quote" Abe Lincoln

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                  • #10
                    I had to use some Permatex Ultra Black on the timing cover because I ran out of the Yamalube stuff on the pan gasket.
                    That rear cork is a total PITA. I think it will seal ok, but man what a pain.

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                    • #11
                      Wait till you do one while the engine is still in the car. Then you can call it a pain.
                      Jamie McLeod
                      Hope Mills, NC

                      1963 Lark "Ugly Betty"
                      1958 Commander "Christine"
                      1964 Wagonaire "Louise"
                      1955 Commander Sedan
                      1964 Champ
                      1960 Lark

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                      • #12
                        done them both in and out of the car....don't cut them - they will leak profusely......Have fun underneath....

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                        • #13
                          After read all the messages, I is not clear to me if you use gasket sealer on BOTH sides of the gaskets. The manual mentions putting the sealer on the gaskets, put them up on the block (my engine is in the car) then apply the pan. It doenst mention putting sealer on the pan side of the gaskets???? Any help here would be appreicated.
                          Gregor

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                          • #14
                            To: Gregor,------ I believe the shop manual is indicating that You 'glue' the gaskets to the block oil pan rail. Nowadays, mechanics (like the folks above) use a silicone based sealer. I'd use the silicone type sealer Myself,
                            BUT DON'T OVERDUE IT! Be extra diligent at the four corners, and apply to both sides.

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                            • #15
                              Usually you don't want to coat the engine side of gaskets, mainly because it's a pain to scrape the cement off the engine parts when you have to replace the gasket. Probably a moot point if the engine is out and accessable for easy scraping or hot tanking. I always used a set of loooong bolts with the heads cut off, screwed lightly into the block in the four corners of the pan to hold the gasket corners in place and make it easy to guide the pan into place. Make the job a lot easier if you're laying underneath the car.....

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