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  • Engine: What to do?

    I just broke an easy out, or extractor, off in the block. I'm not one who usually has this happen and have had it happen only once before, 20 years ago. That was in an intake manifold. This one is in the small gallery plug at the back of the block on the passenger side. The question is how shall I get it out? There is no way to grab it. Can it be ground down level with the block and drilled out with a special drill? Last time it was blown out with a quick shot form an oxy/acetylene torch. I'm not going to do that with this block. Any ideas?

    Len.

  • #2
    Got any M42 cobalt drill bits?

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    • #3
      You may have to drill and tap it out larger for a heli coil.
      Chip
      '63 Cruiser
      '57 Packard wagon
      '61 Lark Regal 4 dr wagon
      '50 Commander 4 dr sedan

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      • #4
        the extractor is hard but this also makes it brittle. You could try breaking it in small pieces with a punch and remove the pieces as you go.

        Originally posted by Skybolt View Post
        I just broke an easy out, or extractor, off in the block. I'm not one who usually has this happen and have had it happen only once before, 20 years ago. That was in an intake manifold. This one is in the small gallery plug at the back of the block on the passenger side. The question is how shall I get it out? There is no way to grab it. Can it be ground down level with the block and drilled out with a special drill? Last time it was blown out with a quick shot form an oxy/acetylene torch. I'm not going to do that with this block. Any ideas?

        Len.

        Russ Shop Foreman \"Rusty Nut Garage\"
        53 2R6 289 5SpdOD (driver)
        57 SH (project)
        60 Lark VIII 2dr sd (driver)

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        • #5
          I would use a diamond bit in a Dremel tool. And get rid of the easy-outs, they always break... If you can heat it up to reduce the hardness it would help in the grinding. While you're at it prepare the hole for a tap to chase the threads...
          1948 M15A-20 Flatbed Truck Rescue
          See rescue progress here on this blog:
          http://studem15a-20.blogspot.com/

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          • #6
            i doubt it can be drilled. might try a small diamond tip bit from McMaster Carr and die grind it out.
            http://www.mcmaster.com/?m=true#diam...g-bits/=gc7avr
            This is why i don't use extractors, some call them 'Easy outs" which is misleading cause they are neither easy nor get anything out.
            I take a nut of the appropriate size, hold it over the hole that has the broken bolt, and use the tip of the MIG to weld from the broken stud back out to the nut. Let it cool, then back it out. The heat of the welding helps get it out, too. I kinda like the O/A torch idea, it is a quick blast of heat, don't see why that would not work
            1947 M5 under restoration
            a bunch of non-Stude stuff

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            • #7
              Thanks guys. This gives me a few ideas. When something like this happens I get so despondent I think of getting rid of all my Studebaker stuff. Such a small thing but sometimes a few small things add up to a big hurdle. Thanks.

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              • #8
                Broken easy outs in cast iron are difficult. The broken piece is considerably harder than the surrounding cast iron, when you apply a drill bit to it, the bit will skitter off the hard part and almost fall into the soft iron. Its best to use a very high speed drill (perhaps air driven,) with a very small carbide drill. If you can run 15,000 rmp, you can drill the hard easy out. Be gentile, Push lightly, if possible use progressively larger drills, until the broken piece is gone.

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                • #9
                  Your welcome...

                  The normal way of doing this is by using an EDM (electrical discharge machining) machine.

                  The shop I mentioned (Evans) can't do it there, but they have a place that does it for them.
                  The diamond bit is about the only other way that's reliable....but it'll take a while, lotsa small bits and a lot of "carefull" work.

                  Mike
                  Last edited by Mike Van Veghten; 02-21-2012, 11:36 AM.

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                  • #10
                    I broke one in the block of a 4.3 Blazer ...... I heated it, an annealed it so I could drill it out. You don't have to melt it.Just get it red hot.
                    Bez Auto Alchemy
                    573-318-8948
                    http://bezautoalchemy.com


                    "Don't believe every internet quote" Abe Lincoln

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by raoul5788 View Post
                      You may have to drill and tap it out larger for a heli coil.
                      I am not sure if you can use a heli-coil on a tapered thread that is thread sealed like that plug. I could be wrong, but that may be hard to seal. I would say it would be easier to drill to the next size up and tap it...if that is possible.

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                      • #12
                        Is there any of the easy out sticking out at all? If so you can put a nut over it and mig weld it in place. Then just back it out.

                        Gordon S

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                        • #13
                          The first priority is removing the Easy Out of course, hopefully with as minimal damage to the threads in the block. The second priority is removing the plug, or whatever is left of it with as little damage to the threads as well. The galley plug in there is probably an NPT thread, so if it will call for an NPT tap if it's necessary to go to a larger plug. If a mismatched thread, such as a helicoil is inserted in the thread, the plug may not seal to the block anymore. I'm all for getting the old plug out, cleaning up the threads, and trying to put in a new plug.
                          1964 Studebaker Commander R2 clone
                          1963 Studebaker Daytona Hardtop with no engine or transmission
                          1950 Studebaker 2R5 w/170 six cylinder and 3spd OD
                          1955 Studebaker Commander Hardtop w/289 and 3spd OD and Megasquirt port fuel injection(among other things)

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                          • #14
                            You mentioned there is a little sticking out. If you can tap the side of it using a punch or chisel you may be able to rock it in the hole and get it to loosen a little at a time and get it to fall out. It just takes a little rocking to get it to release with the amount of taper of the easyout.
                            Rob

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                            • #15
                              I will try a few things but will proceed slowly. It will not be a problem in the long run, only at the time does it seem overwhelming. Not to worry. Just a short delay in a lifetime of Studebakering.
                              Last edited by ; 02-21-2012, 04:06 AM.

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