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Best way to go on king pins?

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  • rusty nut garage
    replied
    The shop manual is your friend.no reaming required on studebaker car king pins.
    Originally posted by JoeHall View Post
    I have always had to ream them, but reaming for me just means a little "sand to fit" near the top. But then, I use a hammer and socket to tap them in. The edge of the bronze bushing tends to swell inward just a tad. Easily cleaned up with 150 grit.

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Originally posted by 52 Ragtop View Post
    I'm getting ready to pull the front suspension from my Avanti "this winter" I'll get the minor kit, and if the king pins are worn, I'll have them hard chromed and then turned back down to size. The plater that I use for the yellow zinc on my brackets also does hard chrome.The biggest thing I want to do is get out all the hard packed in grease from 1963!! <G>

    Jim
    I tried looking for a place in CA. to do the same for me, hard chroming, but to no avail. I found one place but they would not do such a small job. If any one knows of a company in CA that will do hard chroming please let me know. I have seen many Studebaker parts hard chromed over the years with good results and if done right one ends up with a part that is better than stock.

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  • 63 R2 Hawk
    replied
    It's already ot a little play in it and it's not likely to heal itself.

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  • K-Hawk
    replied
    is that grease fitting clean and operating,change it- cleaning out the bushings with wd.... might allow grease in too just a thought. I wonder if you can get cleaner in to the zerk fitting ?

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  • 63 R2 Hawk
    replied
    Thanks to all for the input. I'm just trying to get up the ambition to start this project, it's a lot more fun to drive my car than to work on it and the weather has been pretty nice these past two days. I have a full set of adjustable bushing reamers to accommodate just about any size I encounter, so I'm prepared. I've done quite a few old Fords but they're pretty simple compared to the Stude. I believe the bushing on that side was improperly installed as I have never been able to get it to take grease properly. Time to find out......

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  • JoeHall
    replied
    Originally posted by 1962larksedan View Post
    Really?

    The irony is I have a set of kingpin bushing drivers and a full set of reamers which I've actually used in the past.
    I have always had to ream them, but reaming for me just means a little "sand to fit" near the top. But then, I use a hammer and socket to tap them in. The edge of the bronze bushing tends to swell inward just a tad. Easily cleaned up with 150 grit.

    Leave a comment:


  • tbirdtbird
    replied
    you usually do need to ream new bushings. the pin wants to be a very snug fit. You can get reamers here:
    http://www.mcmaster.com/#reamers/=gldryg
    a machine shop can prolly do it for less, tho
    if you do it yourself, do one bushing at a time.
    Meaning, knock out one old bushing (not both at once), insert new bushing, and ream the new one. The second old one is still in place, and worn, but can still act as a bit of a guide for the reamer. Then do the second one.
    Got kingpins?
    Keep'em well greased and they will last a long long time

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  • sweetolbob
    replied
    Originally posted by nvonada View Post
    No reaming on my 41. Don't take this as gospel but I think anything with a solid front axle needs reamed. Planar and independent suspension cars are already at the proper size. That said I tried to do a kingpin with a hammer and it did not go well. Took it to a machine shop and got back on track. My hammer was either too big, too small, or operated by an idiot. Pick two.
    I don't like pressing bushing and bearing without something to push on that supports the inner diameter of the item I'm pushing. When I did the Avanti I cut up an old kingpin I had. Saves a lot of headaches from crushed or distorted bushings. http://forum.studebakerdriversclub.c...l-Replacements

    A piece of round stock could worked if turned to the ID.

    Bob

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  • 1962larksedan
    replied
    Originally posted by rusty nut garage View Post
    Stude cars 54 and later don't require a reamer. Not sure about the earlier cars. Stude pickups do require the bushings to be reamed to size once installed.
    Really?

    The irony is I have a set of kingpin bushing drivers and a full set of reamers which I've actually used in the past.

    Leave a comment:


  • nvonada
    replied
    No reaming on my 41. Don't take this as gospel but I think anything with a solid front axle needs reamed. Planar and independent suspension cars are already at the proper size. That said I tried to do a kingpin with a hammer and it did not go well. Took it to a machine shop and got back on track. My hammer was either too big, too small, or operated by an idiot. Pick two.

    Leave a comment:


  • rusty nut garage
    replied
    Stude cars 54 and later don't require a reamer. Not sure about the earlier cars. Stude pickups do require the bushings to be reamed to size once installed.


    Originally posted by K-Hawk View Post
    do you press in the pushing, then use a reamer in the bushing to make correct size for new king pin , that's how I remember doing king pins long ago on trucks like this . If this is still the way where can we get the reamer tool to size the spindle back to round, then bushing was larger to fit new spindle, was reamed round for the king pin. they were sold in sets bushings and kingpins and bushing were larger to compensate for wear in spindle thats why they needed to be reamed to size of king pins.

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  • K-Hawk
    replied
    do you press in the pushing, then use a reamer in the bushing to make correct size for new king pin , that's how I remember doing king pins long ago on trucks like this . If this is still the way where can we get the reamer tool to size the spindle back to round, then bushing was larger to fit new spindle, was reamed round for the king pin. they were sold in sets bushings and kingpins and bushing were larger to compensate for wear in spindle thats why they needed to be reamed to size of king pins.
    Last edited by K-Hawk; 03-08-2012, 08:40 PM.

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  • 63 R2 Hawk
    replied
    I guess after 50 years or so, there must be a rash of Studebaker king pins all wearing out at the same time....!

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  • GTCruiser
    replied
    Tried this week to order the full kit for a '64 Hawk for delivery to York and SI does not know when they will have kingpins back from the vendor. Could be weeks or several months.

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  • 63 R2 Hawk
    replied
    Originally posted by dnevin View Post
    Hey Ed,

    If you want a hand when you swap them out, let me know and I'll at least come hold the trouble light for you and help as I can--I've never been into a Studebaker front and and would like to see how it is done.
    Hi, Dave. Don't know if I can claim to know "how it's done", but I'm always glad for any assistance, especially someone who can help keep track of where I laid my tools, parts, etc. Looking for stuff seems to consume most of the time I spend on projects these days...... BTW, I have a shop with a lift where Studebakers are always welcome!

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