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AC condenser

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  • AC condenser

    Can anyone recommend an aftermarket AC condenser for a Lark type with V8? Perferably something I could order on-line. I'm going all stock on the AC setup except for the condenser.

  • #2
    Check vintage air website and their condensers they list by size.
    http://www.vintageair.com


    Frank van Doorn
    1962 GT Hawk 4 speed
    1963 Daytona Conv
    1941 Champion R-2 Rod
    Frank van Doorn
    Omaha, Ne.
    1962 GT Hawk 289 4 speed
    1941 Champion streetrod, R-2 Powered, GM 200-4R trans.
    1952 V-8 232 Commander State "Starliner" hardtop OD

    Comment


    • #3
      I'm using a Vintage Air #03262-VUC in my Daytona. It is 14" tall x 22" wide x .83" thick and works well. It was necessary to fabricate custom brackets to mount it. IIRC, it was about $150. The rest of my system is also Vintage Air. You may also want to check with your NAPA store for your condenser.

      Jim Bradley
      '64 Daytona HT "Rerun"
      Jim Bradley
      Lake Monticello, VA
      '78 Avanti II
      sigpic

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      • #4
        Going stock is great but I wouldn't recommend going with the old, used stock receiver-dryer unless it's a NOS that's been corked up tight it's entire life. If it's been open to the atmosphere, for sure don't use it. The dessicant will be saturated with moisture and mud dauber wasps probably built a house in it. Considering the cost of pumping out or losing the refrigerant, (even 134A), trying to save a few bucks by not changing it in the first place is foolish economy even for a tightwad like me.

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        • #5
          For me, I want A/C and don't care about show; is it better to try to put together a stock system, or go with an aftermarket like Vintage? I'm guessing aftermarket is easier to install, more efficient, and more dependable... what would a Vintage system cost?

          Robert (Bob) Andrews Owner- IoMT (Island of Misfit Toys!)
          Parish, central NY 13131
          http://www.cardomain.com/ride/2358680/1

          Comment


          • #6
            Bob,
            Component wise, air conditioners are actually pretty simple. You have the compressor to compress low pressure gas into high pressure gas sending it to the condenser up front which dissipates heat and turns the gas into a high pressure liquid, then through the receiver-dryer which absorbs any moisture (water) and also stores a little extra freon, then the expansion valve which acts kind of like the ventura on a carb with high pressure liquid on the inflow side and low pressure liquid on the outflow side, the evaporator inside the car where the low pressure liquid turns into gas absorbing heat in the process and a fan to blow air through it to make you comfortable and happy. At least in the past, the big difference between add on units and factory was the add ons usually used barbed hose fittings with hose clamps to make the connections while factory jobs used hoses with threaded fittings and steel lines. All three seem to work just fine with the only disadvantage being old rusty flare fittings on steel lines tend to result in a twisted off line. As far as individual components go, excluding the evaporator you should be able to find any thing you need with any type of hose or pipe fiting at your local auto parts supply. There are all sorts of universal components. Probably the biggest obstacle is a mounting bracket to hold the compressor solidly, mounting an additional pulley/pulleys and an evaporator that fits the confines of your car without being obtrusive. The latter is why I plan on removing the old stock radio from my '51 and then use the space to hold an in-dash evaporator of my own fabrication. Keep in mind that the crankshaft pulley does not have to mound behind the crankshaft bolt and with holes drilled, can simply bolt to longer bolts that hold the harmonic balancer on. Also try to keep the belt wrapped at least halfway around the pulley to prevent excessive slippage or use double belts.

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            • #7
              Bob, I would say the new aftermarket is the way to go. First the biggest diff. is the new compressors. They are smaller, use very little HP to run and are set up for the new freon. Second all the parts are new and modern. Third the price is usaully cheaper. I have installed both Vintage Air and Air Teak and have had good luck. The challange is sizing the unit. Down here in Houston you can never have enough A/C. So I always get the biggest unit my space will hold. I am going to run two units in my 56 wagon. The cost is, I think very reasonable. Around $700.00. In saying that what I usally do is get the interior box from lets say Vintage and then I go to a local after martket A/C store and get everything else. I know some will not have access to a local outlet. Ask a local Street Rodder, they will know about local contacts. Good luck.

              1956 Studebaker Pelham Wagon Houston, Texas
              Remember, \"When all is said and done. More is always said then ever done.\"

              Comment


              • #8
                quote:Originally posted by bams50

                For me, I want A/C and don't care about show; is it better to try to put together a stock system, or go with an aftermarket like Vintage? I'm guessing aftermarket is easier to install, more efficient, and more dependable... what would a Vintage system cost?
                Bob, if I remember correctly, by the time you are done the cost is around $1000. They have a unit called the Mark IV, which is a floor mount similar to the units Studebaker used. I'm looking at one of these for my Daytona. They come reasonably complete. Some of the hoses are cut to fit, so your local A/C may have to crimp your lines for you. Vintage Air has a bracket for the compressor they sell for the V8 (I'm not aware of a 6 cylinder bracket). These systems use a R34 freon. Go to Vintage Air's website. They'll also send you a catalog. Most hot rod shops sell their stuff, so if you have one near you, they'll have most of the parts available too.



                ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                Tom - Valrico, FL

                1964 Studebaker Daytona - 289 4V, 4-Speed

                Tom - Bradenton, FL

                1964 Studebaker Daytona - 289 4V, 4-Speed (Cost To Date: $2514.10)
                1964 Studebaker Commander - 170 1V, 3-Speed w/OD

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                • #9
                  "Down here in Houston you can never have enough A/C."

                  Probably no truer statement ever made. High humidity decreases the effeciency of AC more than high temps do. I bet most of the year your east Texas ACs are working harder than any Las Vegas or Phoenix ones are.

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                  • #10
                    I have never heard anyone in Houston say my A/c is to cold, got to get a smaller one. Yes, Houston is a killer on A/C performance.

                    1956 Studebaker Pelham Wagon Houston, Texas
                    Remember, \"When all is said and done. More is always said then ever done.\"

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Great info- thanks John, Ken, and Tom!

                      Excellent description of how A/C works- I never really knew how, just know I'm a big fan Thanks, John!

                      Robert (Bob) Andrews Owner- IoMT (Island of Misfit Toys!)
                      Parish, central NY 13131
                      http://www.cardomain.com/ride/2358680/1

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Ken- What do you mean by "running 2 units"? You mean 2 compressors or what?

                        I'm planning this for the 57 Provincial (4 dr.)... We don't have near the heat and humidity that Houston has, but we do have our share... so while I certainly will do the research to correctly size mine, what do you suggest?

                        Robert (Bob) Andrews Owner- IoMT (Island of Misfit Toys!)
                        Parish, central NY 13131
                        http://www.cardomain.com/ride/2358680/1

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          What John said about humidity is absolutly true. I lived in New Orleans, and now in Las Vegas. New Orleans was brutal on A/C in both homes and cars. Not nearly so bad here, and it's been 108 this week. One of those old Evaporatative Coolers (swamp coolers) would work great in a Stude here, except they are probably twice as expensive as an aftermarket AC unit, if you can find them!

                          Las Vegas, NV
                          '51 Champion Business Coupe G899965 10G-Q4-1434

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                          • #14
                            This will be my 5th unit I have installed in a old car of mine. Here are the challanges I face in Houston when I design one for my use. First is, Do you want a A/C-Heater unit. This would more then likely mean you are going to remove your old heater and defroster and replace with new. If you just want A/c the under the dash unit is not a bad why to go. I put one in a 55 T-bird and it will freeze you out of the car. Keep in mind though this is a two seater. (the unit I used was a Dalworth,fantastic) Second, how much room do you have under the dash(a real important measurement) to tuck away a unit. Third ,how much air space do you have to cool.
                            Here is my decision on A/c for my 56 2 dr wagon.
                            1) I want to upgrade both a/c and heater. Therefore a under the dash unit will probally not work as most are A/C only.
                            2) The space I am looking at under the dash on my wagon is not that large. The dash does not stick out to much so unless you want it to look stupid you will probally be limited to the size you can use.
                            3) a wagon has the most space I have ever cooled.
                            SO here is my selections.
                            I will get the largest unit that will fit under the dash I can. from my research it will be big enough to cool a 4 dr sedan. It will be a defroster, heater and A/c.
                            Next I will get a second unit that will be A/C only that will go under the back seat. It will basicly be a under dash unit that will not have front vents as you know it. It will have 4 holes that I will run hoses off of and place a/c vents in my 2nd seat side pannels that these hoses will be connected to.
                            These two units will run off the same Sanyo compressor but will have seperate fan and temp switches. So I can run one or both when needed.
                            I will have to run A/C lines either under the floor pans from one unit to the other or as I will do run the lines on the side of the tunnel(inside) and cover with carpet.
                            The condenser in front of the rad should be as large as you can fit up there. Sometimes a extra pushing fan in front is needed, it depends on the car.
                            Good Luck. I will be installing all this in the next three months. I will give you an update. Everyone who tries to sell me a single unit when asked face to face will agree one unit will NOT cool the back of a wagon. Again may be over kill for places other then Houston.
                            Sorry for the long e-mail.

                            1956 Studebaker Pelham Wagon Houston, Texas
                            Remember, \"When all is said and done. More is always said then ever done.\"

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                            • #15
                              One more thing. I am going to insulate the entire inside of my wagon with a product called Lizard Skin. It is a water base spray on coating that is no thicker then a credit card. It is suppose to be as good as the double faced jute everyone used in the past. It is real important down here to keep the heat out. My wagon is a body off and everything is stripped out of it so after paint it will be no problem to do this as it is just a shell.

                              1956 Studebaker Pelham Wagon Houston, Texas
                              Remember, \"When all is said and done. More is always said then ever done.\"

                              Comment

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