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problem with timing?

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  • Engine: problem with timing?

    Forgot to plug the vac advance when adjusting the timing on the car......any problems to come of this?

  • #2
    It depends upon where the vacuum is picked up for the vacuum advance.

    If MANIFOLD vacuum...downstream from the throttle plates...then yes, it will make a difference. Idle does produce a high vacuum condition and the vacuum advance will be "in" at idle which will add advance. If set with the vacuum line connected, your timing will be retarded relative to factory spec.

    If PORTED vacuum...upstream from the throttle plates...then probably no difference. The distributor will not "see" the vacuum at idle and will not advance the timing at idle.

    If unsure if you are hooked to a manifold or ported vacuum source, provide a picture of the vacuum hose connection.

    The easiest solution, of course, is just to disconnect the vacuum hose, plug the hole to the carb or manifold, and retime it.
    Dick Steinkamp
    Bellingham, WA

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    • #3
      The vac advance picks up it's signal from the front port on the new Ecarb.
      Originally posted by Dick Steinkamp View Post
      It depends upon where the vacuum is picked up for the vacuum advance.

      If MANIFOLD vacuum...downstream from the throttle plates...then yes, it will make a difference. Idle does produce a high vacuum condition and the vacuum advance will be "in" at idle which will add advance. If set with the vacuum line connected, your timing will be retarded relative to factory spec.

      If PORTED vacuum...upstream from the throttle plates...then probably no difference. The distributor will not "see" the vacuum at idle and will not advance the timing at idle.

      If unsure if you are hooked to a manifold or ported vacuum source, provide a picture of the vacuum hose connection.

      The easiest solution, of course, is just to disconnect the vacuum hose, plug the hole to the carb or manifold, and retime it.

      Comment


      • #4
        IIRC, an Edelbrock has ports for both manifold and ported vacuum. Hopefully someone here knows those carbs well enough to tell you which is which.
        Dick Steinkamp
        Bellingham, WA

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        • #5
          Ecarb...?

          The lower port (about 3/16 dia.) is full vacuum, the higher port (about 3/16 dia.) is ported vacuum.

          In the case of any carburetor...the port(s) below the throttle shaft is full vacuum, the port(s) above the throttle shaft is ported vacuum.

          Mike

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          • #6
            E-Carb= Edelbrock carb AFB clone. The dist get's its vac signal from the port closest to the passenger side on the carb
            Originally posted by Mike Van Veghten View Post
            Ecarb...?

            The lower port (about 3/16 dia.) is full vacuum, the higher port (about 3/16 dia.) is ported vacuum.

            In the case of any carburetor...the port(s) below the throttle shaft is full vacuum, the port(s) above the throttle shaft is ported vacuum.

            Mike

            Comment


            • #7
              Hawklover, hey if it starts instantly, provives good power and doesn't pre-detonate, that's usually "right-on" for me. I typically keep advancing it untill it kicks back at starting or begins to ping, then crank it back just enough to eliminate those issues. Now that may be a little "seat-of-the-pants" for some folks, but it works for me. Dan

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              • #8
                CarCrossword Dans method is what my dear ol' Dad taught me. At his dealership he was the Packard/Studebaker certified mechanic and thats how he did it. It works for me.

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                • #9
                  that's the best way to time an engine...timing marks are not always accurate.....good enough for the masses, tho....
                  1947 M5 under restoration
                  a bunch of non-Stude stuff

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                  • #10
                    I like to to hook the vacuum gauge up and set time to highest vacuum and back off a little and see how it runs.

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                    • #11
                      Yup,---timing by ear------You've got to love it! (But try to explain that to a Snap-on or Mac tool dealer)

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                      • #12
                        When you find out you did something incorrectly, just do it again correctly! Piece of cake.

                        Frank DuVal

                        I also fine tune timing by advancing to knock and backing off.
                        Frank DuVal

                        50 Commander 4 door

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