Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Stude Parts in Other Brand Engines

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Engine: Stude Parts in Other Brand Engines

    Recently I heard of old Cadillac engine builders using Studebaker rocker arms (likely for the ajustment aspect) in souped-up Cadillac engines, but also heard of them using Studebaker rods in Caddy engines as well. Has anyone ever heard of this or can they confirm such use? Also, any other Studebaker parts used by hot-rodders in other brand engines ? Thanks, Dan

  • #2
    I knew of a guy in the last couple of years that was making a fortune selling Stude V8 rocker arms to guys with early Caddie engines. The Stude rockers slip right onto the Caddie shafts.

    Comment


    • #3
      It was recently revealed on Racing Studebakers that Studebaker forged cranks were reground
      for use in SB Chevy race engines as a cheaper alternative to buying a forged Chevy crank.

      I had never heard that before.

      Tom
      '63 Avanti R1, '03 Mustang Cobra 13" front disc/98 GT rear brakes, 03 Cobra 17" wheels, GM alt, 97 Z28 leather seats, TKO 5-spd, Ported heads w/SST full flow valves.
      Check out my disc brake adapters to install 1994-2004 Mustang disc brakes on your Studebaker!!
      http://forum.studebakerdriversclub.c...bracket-update
      I have also written many TECH how to articles, do a search for my Forum name to find them

      Comment


      • #4
        Back in the 1970s, I repaired Jaguar automatic transmissions with Studebaker parts, rather than parts from Jag or B-W (same DG-250M).
        Gary L.
        Wappinger, NY

        SDC member since 1968
        Studebaker enthusiast much longer

        Comment


        • #5
          Tom, Since most of the S/B Chevys utilized forged cranks, I'd bet they were doing it for the stroke. 265's & 283's were 3.00 inches, 327's were 3.25 inches and 350's were 3.48 inches. All 289 & 304.5 C.I. Studes were 3.63 inches. They likely reground the mains and utilized a rod and piston combo that worked, picking up a significant number of cubes. Dan

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by CarCrosswordDan View Post
            Tom, Since most of the S/B Chevys utilized forged cranks, I'd bet they were doing it for the stroke. 265's & 283's were 3.00 inches, 327's were 3.25 inches and 350's were 3.48 inches. All 289 & 304.5 C.I. Studes were 3.63 inches. They likely reground the mains and utilized a rod and piston combo that worked, picking up a significant number of cubes. Dan
            Most Chevys used CAST cranks, unless it was a high performance version. Unless you are talking about MacKinnon (sp) specified for later Studes!
            Most Chevys were two bolt main, small valved, pressed in rocker studed, stretched chain cam drive, oil burning, uninspired, made for basic uninspired transportation.
            Oh sure they're cheap.....but conversly.....they're cheap.
            Last edited by bezhawk; 01-05-2012, 06:22 PM.
            Bez Auto Alchemy
            573-318-8948
            http://bezautoalchemy.com


            "Don't believe every internet quote" Abe Lincoln

            Comment


            • #7
              Bezhawk, sorry, guess I was thinking of the '67-'68 302's.
              So, you're right about the cast/forged issue but don't you think it was more about the added stroke than the forged issue that instigated the change to a Stude crank? Thanks, Dan

              Comment


              • #8
                I think it would all depend on the cost of the machine work to make it fit the Chevy block. The metalurgy and the process they used in the making of the Stude forgings is very good, so good in fact, that they can be nitrided. Even forged GM manufactured cranks weren't capable of surviving that process.
                Last edited by bezhawk; 01-05-2012, 07:16 PM.
                Bez Auto Alchemy
                573-318-8948
                http://bezautoalchemy.com


                "Don't believe every internet quote" Abe Lincoln

                Comment


                • #9
                  I'd be willing to bet that there are substantially more Stude V8s surviving-percentage-wise, than sb 265, 283 and 327s. I used to "mess around" with Chevy motors, always tried to find the truck engines that had steel cranks and thicker wall castings. Studebaker was able to build "muscle car" engines using pretty much all off-the-shelf parts and the heads had an extra headbolt per cylinder. The other guys had to make special cranks, rods, blocks etc to get dependable HP. Studebaker also understated their HP numbers on JT motors a little. Didn't want people to think they were hot rods.......

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by CarCrosswordDan View Post
                    Tom, Since most of the S/B Chevys utilized forged cranks, I'd bet they were doing it for the stroke. 265's & 283's were 3.00 inches, 327's were 3.25 inches and 350's were 3.48 inches. All 289 & 304.5 C.I. Studes were 3.63 inches. They likely reground the mains and utilized a rod and piston combo that worked, picking up a significant number of cubes. Dan
                    Dan, you lost me here....if the Stude had a larger stroke than all the Chevy crankshafts, how could using a Chevy crankshaft net a larger displacement than the stock Stude crankshaft in a Stude engine? Wouldn't a Chevy crankshaft decrease the displacement in a Stude?...not that it really matters because I'm not about to build such an engine... just doesn't make sense to me. Regards, Junior.
                    sigpic
                    1954 C5 Hamilton car.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      People where using modified Studebaker cranks in SBC engines not using SBC cranks in Studebakers. This was an extensive modification involving welding machining and then grinding.

                      By the way the material used for the Studebaker cranks is the most ordinary steel you can buy, SAE 1045. It is not anything special and Chevy forged cranks can be nitrided.
                      David L

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by junior View Post
                        Dan, you lost me here....if the Stude had a larger stroke than all the Chevy crankshafts, how could using a Chevy crankshaft net a larger displacement than the stock Stude crankshaft in a Stude engine? Wouldn't a Chevy crankshaft decrease the displacement in a Stude?...not that it really matters because I'm not about to build such an engine... just doesn't make sense to me. Regards, Junior.
                        Junior, That is exactly what he is saying. People were {allegedly} put Stude cranks IN Chevy motors to gain displacement AND a stronger crank in the Chevy.
                        With a Stude having 3.68" stroke and a Chevy having a max {excluding the 400 sbc} of 3.48" and as low as 3.00" you would gain displacement in the Chevy.
                        Couple that with a MUCH stronger forged crank over a stock cast or mediocore forged crank at best, I can see some early racer guys trying to do this.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Yes we did it!

                          In the late sixties Valley Ring and Rebore and later (early seventies) Hank The Crank were modifying Studebaker 289 crankshafts to fit Chevy small blocks. It made a strong stroker crank for drag racing and even some of the road racing guys bought them. We had a standing order in all the wrecking yards for any and all 289 cranks they got in. Joe our crank grinder did about twenty to thirty cranks a month or more depending on orders. I got to watch him make them for about half a day when things were slow. Of course we couldn't call them Studebaker stroker cranks. Just called them Chevy strokers. You can't have people knowing you are using Studebaker parts to make your Chevy go fast. First hand eye witness to what I would call today madness. It's amazing that any 289 cranks even exist in California today.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Sorry, misunderstood the post, should have read it a second time...now I get it, Stude crank in a Chevy. Today there are so many stroker cranks and kits available for the SBC its hard to imagine that back in the day people were willing to invest time and $ to get a Stude crank machined to fit a Chevy. Were all Stude 289 cranks forged? I remember a few years back reading in Hot Rod that you could order a crate SBC that was 427ci and came with a 2 year warranty...my how times have changed!
                            sigpic
                            1954 C5 Hamilton car.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by CarCrosswordDan View Post
                              Bezhawk, sorry, guess I was thinking of the '67-'68 302's.
                              So, you're right about the cast/forged issue but don't you think it was more about the added stroke than the forged issue that instigated the change to a Stude crank? Thanks, Dan
                              I'm sure they were after the forged crank. It isn't that hard to take a 350 crank with a 3.48 stroke and build up and turn the crank for a longer stroke. I've done it a few times in my shop.

                              Joe
                              sigpic

                              1962 Daytona
                              1964 Cruiser
                              And a few others

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X