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The questions just keep coming - filler block 259 (not your SBC)

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  • Engine: The questions just keep coming - filler block 259 (not your SBC)

    I temporarily mounted my timing cover so that I could hold the filler block in place and get the pan on.
    However as the filler block sits on top of the pan gasket I cannot get the bolt holes to line up. (I can get one in.)
    They are about the same distance from lining up as the gasket is thick. The service manual says to put one bolt in and pry the filler block upward to make it possible to get the others in. Sounds like a great way to get them cross threaded to me. The engine is on a stand and my pushing on the block does not force the holes to line up
    How does one get enough pressure on it to compress the gasket so the screw holes will line up?
    I do not have the hub on the crankshaft yet. Should that be installed first? I'm concerned about getting the timing cover seal in place as well as not being able to get the bolts into the filler block.
    Some guidance is needed and appreciated.

  • #2
    I did one a while ago, on an engine in the bay. Used a 2X4 on a floor jack under the filler block and left it overnight. Seemed to work ok
    64 GT Hawk (K7)
    1970 Avanti (R3)

    Comment


    • #3
      DO make sure you install the hub assembly before you tighten the front cover retaining bolts. This insures that the hub is able to "center" itself in the felt seal. Also, apply a coating of motor oil to the felt seal before installing the hub. Hope this helps.

      Dan Miller
      Auburn, GA

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      • #4
        Thanks Dan,
        I am aware of procedure to install the hub. So does one align and bolt the timing cover into the proper position and then try to force the filler block into alignment?

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        • #5
          Originally posted by 5brown1 View Post
          Thanks Dan,
          I am aware of procedure to install the hub. So does one align and bolt the timing cover into the proper position and then try to force the filler block into alignment?
          It sounds like you are trying to do it with the Oil Pan on. I like to put the whole mess together at once, much easier to spend another $13.00 for a Pan Gasket.

          But then you really will want the Engine out on a Engine Stand, and OH that leaky Main Seal really otta be replaced, and what about those "about to leak" Core Plugs, etc, etc, etc.
          One thing DOES lead to another, but sometimes that's how life is, no easy way out.
          StudeRich
          Second Generation Stude Driver,
          Proud '54 Starliner Owner
          SDC Member Since 1967

          Comment


          • #6
            Yes to what Rich reccomends. You're already 1/2 way there and in the end you won't regret the extra work.

            Dan Miller
            Auburn, GA

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            • #7
              Nope, I am just reassembling after overhauling the engine. Bored .030, new bearings and seals, and everything you mentioned has been done. The engine is on a stand and the pan is not on yet. It just appeared that stabilizing the filler block by bolting it to the timing cover would be the easiest way to mount the pan and keep the front seal in place. But the bolt holes in the timing cover and filler block do not line up and apparently require the side pan gaskets to be compressed by the filler block. How is that done?
              What is your order of action when installing a pan gasket? I have already sealed the side gaskets to the block.

              Comment


              • #8
                Is the filler block a New reproduction one? If the Pan Side Gaskets are the standard thickness, the Filler should fit over the ends of the Pan Gasket and the holes would line up.
                However if this Filler has been made wrong, or the holes redrilled and or Heilicoiled, as often is the case there could be fit issues.
                StudeRich
                Second Generation Stude Driver,
                Proud '54 Starliner Owner
                SDC Member Since 1967

                Comment


                • #9
                  I have had no problems getting filler blocks to line up properly. I would check the hole alignment like StudeRich suggested.
                  Jamie McLeod
                  Hope Mills, NC

                  1963 Lark "Ugly Betty"
                  1958 Commander "Christine"
                  1964 Wagonaire "Louise"
                  1955 Commander Sedan
                  1964 Champ
                  1960 Lark

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    filler block pictures

                    The filler block is the original one for this engine. It appears to be in good condition and has not been modified in any way. I purchased the pan gasket from Studebaker International so I assume it is ok.
                    I am including some pictures which hopefully show the misalignment of the bolt holes.. Maybe someone can spot something I have done incorrectly.
                    Thanks for the suggestions.

                    Will installing the pan cause the filler block to compress the side gaskets enough for the holes to line up?
                    Attached Files
                    Last edited by 5brown1; 01-04-2012, 01:50 PM.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      The solution Thanks to 64V-K7

                      I found the solution to the misaligned bolt holes. 64V-K7 is apparently one of few others who have had this problem.
                      I used his solution but as my engine is on a stand I was able to just flip it over and apply pressure from the engine stand to the filler plate. I installed the jack last evening and this afternoon the gasket was compressed enough that I was able to install the bolts.
                      I can hardly wait to tackle getting the cork end pan gaskets on now.
                      Attached Files
                      Last edited by 5brown1; 01-05-2012, 11:20 AM. Reason: just because

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                      • #12
                        Looks good, I can't see if the oil Slinger is in there or not, just make sure it is the last thing in the Timing Cover before the Woodruff key and the Hub gets pressed onto the Crank.
                        StudeRich
                        Second Generation Stude Driver,
                        Proud '54 Starliner Owner
                        SDC Member Since 1967

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I've got the pan on now and am going to remove and paint the timing cover. The slinger is in there.
                          By the way I was think of your forum identity - I think I might change mine to StudePoor.

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                          • #14
                            Well it's just my name: "Rich". certainly NOT my financial position! I am poorer since you did not buy my '54 Land Cruiser! Lol!
                            StudeRich
                            Second Generation Stude Driver,
                            Proud '54 Starliner Owner
                            SDC Member Since 1967

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              After stabilizing the filler block the pan was installed without much trouble. Today I mounted the timing cover and the hub. I ended up pulling the hub off after the first installation because the timing cover would not move up enough to allow the hub to be centered in the seal. I ended up elongating the bottom four holes (the ones which line up with the filler block) in order to get enough movement in the timing cover so the seal would center. I think that completed the deal and I hope with no leaks.

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