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First look at 289 engine internals; are these original Stude pistons and valves?

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  • Engine: First look at 289 engine internals; are these original Stude pistons and valves?

    Took off the heads and pan on my 57 Golden Hawk's 289 today (so an out-of-town buddy could take a look; the rebuild is a year or more off yet...)
    It APPEARS that
    a) engine was recently rebuilt; very clean (what you see is untouched by us, everything looked great)
    b) original Stude pistons? no 'oversize' stamps on them and appear to look like those shown in the factory manual; and hardly any ridge, as mentioned by others, likely to get by without a rebore this time too.

    How about the valves? They are Eaton; is that what Stude used originally? Will eventually take everything apart (was itching to keep going today!) but curious if the valves have been replaced. I forgot to check and see if there were hardened seats, but I don't think so, sure doesn't appear to be in the photo.
    Also from the "010" stamped into the crank counterweight, I assume the crank was ground once.
    Only 60 some thousand miles on odometer, but cable broken so who knows..... I wonder why it got rebuilt in the first place, most everything else looks original so why would the crank get reground, if the pistons and valves(?) were ok?
    So far, the only things I see that I'd for sure replace are the push rods (if available?) as they have some flat spots, and perhaps a set of head bolts, just out of prudence (I don't like reusing headbolts if new ones are available.) And then hardened valve seats......and rings.
    But final dis-assembly and micrometers will tell a lot more of the story of course. AFTER the blasted sheet metal work gets done :-(
    Attached Files
    Last edited by bsrosell; 12-29-2011, 05:39 PM.

  • #2
    I wouldn't assume anything.
    If you remove the main bearings and look at the backside of the insert, it should tell you if it is oversize.
    From your pic's, everything looks pretty normal for an engine that has had regular service.
    HTIH (Hope The Info Helps)

    Jeff


    Get your facts first, and then you can distort them as much as you please. Mark Twain



    Note: SDC# 070190 (and earlier...)

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    • #3
      Looks like it's been running with old, chemically depleted anti freeze

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      • #4
        I'm not a mechanic so, is that rust on a couple of the valves shown in photo 3, looks like corrosion in the head or is that normal crud?
        John Clements
        Christchurch, New Zealand

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        • #5
          Did you sneak into my garage and take pics of my motor?
          That looks exactly like my my pistons, valves, and bottom end. Right down to the brick red color inside the engine, the minor corrosion in the water jackets, and the patchy black paint on the outside.

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          • #6
            VERY difficult to say if the valves have been replaced or not..
            But yes, Stude did use Eaton valves. Though it is difficult to tell, thet do look a little deep in the chambers, maybe had a valve grind or two over the years. Should be no harm in any case.

            Looks pretty OEM from your pictures

            Mike
            Last edited by Mike Van Veghten; 12-30-2011, 09:55 AM.

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            • #7
              I have been straining my eyes hard to see if there are any little tin locknuts (PalNuts) on the Rod Bolts, it does not appear to have any, meaning someone has been in there. But as you know it's not about how many or if ever, it has been disassembled, but what is it's CURRENT condition. Time will tell.
              StudeRich
              Second Generation Stude Driver,
              Proud '54 Starliner Owner
              SDC Member Since 1967

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              • #8
                Rich -

                Yea..there's at least a couple on them there rod bolts.

                Mike

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                • #9
                  yep, those little lock nuts are there except for three the last guy in apparently lost. Don't like that sloppiness, and will be looking things over very carefully when actually get to rebuild time.
                  For now, just wanted to have a quick look while my friend was here and see if any thing major. New valves and rods and/or pushers or inserts,.... all to be determined when the vernier and micrometer comes out later. Same with pan bolts, several different lengths (all work, but still sloppy; where were the originals? What else was he sloppy about?)
                  Was just glad to see a generally stock and (to the naked eye) apparently readily rebuildable block and heads.
                  Does anyone know what the original thickness of 289 heads are, and what surfaces that is measured at? I couldn't find a spec in the factory manual. I'm wondering how many times it has been milled. GUESSING once, but no way to know without measuring (and guessing at how much was taken each time). Again, from appearances, looks like it has been gone through just once., block untouched, and heads probably milled....

                  Originally posted by Mike Van Veghten View Post
                  Rich -

                  Yea..there's at least a couple on them there rod bolts.

                  Mike

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                  • #10
                    Is that a .010 on the front crank lobe?

                    Gordon
                    Last edited by laughinlark; 12-30-2011, 10:14 PM.

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                    • #11
                      yes, thus my assumption (until further disassembly) that the crank was ground once.....
                      There is also a little ground-off area on one lobe, NOT a neat factory 'hole', that also indicates someone rebalanced it.

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                      • #12
                        Oops, I missed the .010 in your original post. Looks like you have a great start for a rebuild. They're fun to do.


                        Gordon S

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