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short steering arms

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  • short steering arms

    Does anybody know the exact difference in length between the original steering arms on a 62 Hawk and the short Avanti arms that sell for about $110?

  • #2

    If you can do with anything but 'exactly', they're roughly 2" shorter, give or take 1/8"

    Bob Johnstone
    64 GT Hawk (K7)
    1970 Avanti (R3)

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    • #3
      Bob,
      Do all Avanti's and Avanti II's use the short arms? If not, what year did they change?

      Jim

      1966 Avanti II RQA 0088
      Jim
      Often in error, never in doubt
      http://rabidsnailracing.blogspot.com/

      ____1966 Avanti II RQA 0088_______________1963 Avanti R2 63R3152____________http://rabidsnailracing.blogspot.com/

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      • #4
        Excellent--Thanks. My steering arm now overlaps the left tie rod about an inch, so I need to move the end forward about one and a half before I can drive over any bumps.

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        • #5
          quote:Originally posted by jlmccuan
          Do all Avanti's and Avanti II's use the short arms? If not, what year did they change?
          From what I have read, the short arms showed up on the Avanti II in
          around 1985. It reduces the steering turns lock to lock about one full
          turn which should give you about 2.5 to 3 turns lock to lock on the
          Avanti with the faster box. I didnt realize that the Avanti has a bit
          of a quicker box than the other models. I was going on 4.5 turns lock
          to lock, but it seems its more like 3.5 to 4 turns??

          quote:Originally posted by buddymander

          Excellent--Thanks. My steering arm now overlaps the left tie rod about an inch, so I need to move the end forward about one and a half before I can drive over any bumps.
          Huh?[?]

          Tom

          '63 Avanti, zinc plated drilled & slotted 03 Mustang Cobra 13" front disc/98 GT rear brakes, 03 Cobra 17" wheels, GM alt, 97 Z28 leather seats, soon: 97 Z28 T-56 6-spd, Ported heads w/SST full flow valves, 'R3' 276 cam, Edelbrock AFB Carb, GM HEI distributor, 8.8mm plug wires
          '63 Avanti R1, '03 Mustang Cobra 13" front disc/98 GT rear brakes, 03 Cobra 17" wheels, GM alt, 97 Z28 leather seats, TKO 5-spd, Ported heads w/SST full flow valves.
          Check out my disc brake adapters to install 1994-2004 Mustang disc brakes on your Studebaker!!
          http://forum.studebakerdriversclub.c...bracket-update
          I have also written many TECH how to articles, do a search for my Forum name to find them

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          • #6

            I don't recall what year, it was the mid eighties. 85 seems right as it was the year that the factory started making all the sausage, with GM, Chrysler, and Ford parts, etc. The reason for the change was that the Ross boxes were all gone. The factory found another box, supposedly from a circa 62 Corvette that bolted in, but the pitman arm was a different length and the quick steer arms countered the pitman arm problem.
            There was also a steering box from a Fork lift ( Clarke?) that could be used if you did a little voodoo with the mounting scheme

            Bob Johnstone
            64 GT Hawk (K7)
            1970 Avanti (R3)

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            • #7
              quote:Originally posted by 55Prez


              I don't recall what year, it was the mid eighties. 85 seems right as it was the year that the factory started making all the sausage, with GM, Chrysler, and Ford parts, etc. The reason for the change was that the Ross boxes were all gone. The factory found another box, supposedly from a circa 62 Corvette that bolted in, but the pitman arm was a different length and the quick steer arms countered the pitman arm problem.
              There was also a steering box from a Fork lift ( Clarke?) that could be used if you did a little voodoo with the mounting scheme
              I know our '76 had the slow, sloppy box. It could shift on its Mickey Mouse mountings which caused it to wear badly. I got the last NOS Ross box that Don Waldecker (Craftsman Automotive, Falls Church, VA) had. He told me at the time that the original was a forklift box. Apparently Altmans weren't too concerned about sporty handling. It made a huge change. I have a set of the original Blake short steering arms- they are going on my '64 Daytona Wagonaire which was ordered with manual steering (something like 5+ turns lock-to-lock). I converted it to power steering in '69, but only from the pitman arm down so I still have the really slow steering, but it sure turns easily.

              [img=right]http://www.frontiernet.net/~thejohnsons/Forum%20signature%20pix/R-4.JPG[/img=right][img=right]http://www.frontiernet.net/~thejohnsons/Forum%20signature%20pix/64L.JPG[/img=right][img=right]http://www.frontiernet.net/~thejohnsons/Forum%20signature%20pix/64P.jpg[/img=right][img=right]http://www.frontiernet.net/~thejohnsons/Forum%20signature%20pix/53K.jpg[/img=right]Paul Johnson
              '53 Commander Starliner (since 1966)
              '64 Daytona Wagonaire (original owner)
              '64 Daytona Convertible (2006)
              Museum R-4 engine
              Paul Johnson, Wild and Wonderful West Virginia.
              '64 Daytona Wagonaire, '64 Avanti R-1, Museum R-4 engine, '72 Gravely Model 430 with Onan engine

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