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Persistant coolant leak

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  • Persistant coolant leak


  • #2
    The leak: If you think the base of the housing is warped, take it off and sand it flat using a piece of 100 grit sandpaper and a flat surface. I would be more suspicious of the hose connection. This is what leaked on my car and because the coolant runs down where it is hard to see, it looks like the gasket is leaking.
    Operating temp: My Hawk runs up to 210 at times. Check your gage for reference by sticking a thermometer into the radiator. Compare this to the reading on the dash gage.
    Pressure cap: 13 is correct. It should raise the boiling temp to around 220 I think. This would be a temperature when you might start to worry.
    I find that my Hawk gets the hottest while cruising the interstate at speed or when stuck in traffic on a hot day. I've had the radiator recored, checked the water pump, changed thermostats, thoroughly cleaned the engine and it still seems to run a bit hot. When it burns up, at least I'll have a clear conscience.


    Tim K.
    '64 R2 GT Hawk
    Tim K.
    \'64 R2 GT Hawk

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    • #3
      One other thing to consider is porosity of the aluminum neck.
      You might want to clean and inspect the inside of the housing and check for a pinhole. You can take a dab of Permatex #1 hardening sealer and smooth it over the inside of the housing to seal it up.
      Just keep the amount very small and thin on the inside of the housing. Let it set up overnight and clean the thermostat groove and sand the surface flat.
      It's amazing what 6-15 psi will push through a weeping pinhole.
      You can do this fix for free.
      Hope the info helps.
      Jeff[8D]




      DEEPNHOCK at Gmail.com
      Brooklet, Georgia
      '37 Coupe Express (never ending project)
      '37 Coupe Express Trailer (project)
      '61 Hawk (project)
      http://community.webshots.com/user/deepnhock

      HTIH (Hope The Info Helps)

      Jeff


      Get your facts first, and then you can distort them as much as you please. Mark Twain



      Note: SDC# 070190 (and earlier...)

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      • #4
        Be positive that it is not the hose leaking.
        Been there !

        1961 Hawk 4BC,4-SPEED,TT

        Lewisville,NC
        (formerly chevpartsman)
        sigpic
        1961 Hawk ...4-Speed;4bc;Twin Traction


        Ken Byrd
        Lewisville,NC

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        • #5

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          • #6
            Cool, Karl, see you in SB

            Tim K.
            '64 R2 GT Hawk
            Tim K.
            \'64 R2 GT Hawk

            Comment


            • #7
              I think the gasket makes a big difference, you have to use a good thick gasket for some reason. I second the other comments, you need to sand mating surfaces flat with sandpaper on glass or other similar method to get them perfectly straight. Might want to actually use a torque wrench to insure that you don't succumb to the temptation to get the bolts TOO tight and warp the housing after you sanded it flat! Also make sure that the threads aren't pulling out of the water manifold from previous overtightening; a little chamfer with a large drill bit will fix it if they are. The correct housing for your car is aluminum; only the earlier four bolt housings were cast iron.

              If you have a 180 degree thermostat 190 degrees at the back of the head is perfectly acceptable. 13 lbs. is factory.

              I realize you've already pronounced success, just posting for the benefit of others that may have this problem (I know that in the past, I have.)

              nate

              --
              55 Commander Starlight
              http://members.cox.net/njnagel
              --
              55 Commander Starlight
              http://members.cox.net/njnagel

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              • #8
                Most automotive temp senders should be considered "indicative only". They are not very exact when new, and certainly don't improve with age.
                If the only concern is a "hot" running engine, do check what the temperature actually is, the car temp gauge might not give a very true "indication".
                Use one of the new-age laser gauges. Borrow or buy one, they are excellent value. Just point it at various surfaces and read off the temp. Simple and clever, and rather precise readings.
                With good info, you can make the right decision.
                /H

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