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  • #16
    Originally posted by CodyC View Post
    Alright I recorded a couple videos one of the car starting while watching the amps and the other with the generator out. My generator doesn't set snugly and I'm wondering if that's why it won't charge.
    If you need better pictures of the wiring of the generator let me know carussell. I have it out so I can open it and take lots of pictures.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bVJxLZltSR4
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P3TDVDDVCNM
    Make sure of these connections :
    1) the RED wire attached to the case on your generator is attached to the case on your regulator. This seems a bit redundant in this circuit, but many regulators (sometimes generators) are isolated from chassis ground (becoming chassis "neutral" and not chassis "ground"); make sure it's there anyway, just for grins;
    2) the WHITE wire is attached to the "A" terminal on your generator; this terminal is attached to one side of your brushes internally, the other brush is attached to the case internally (both these brushes make contact with the ARMATURE); this WHITE wire is generally larger than the other generator wire(s). The opposite end of the WHITE wire should be connected to the "A" terminal on your regulator. On this terminal there should also be a BLACK/white wire that goes to the generator indicator lamp; do not confuse it with the WHITE/black wire on the "F" terminal.
    3) the WHITE/black wire should be connected to the "F" terminal on your generator; this terminal is attached to one side of the FIELD coil(s) inside your generator, the other side of the field coil(s) is connected internally back to the armature terminal. The opposite end of this WHITE/black wire should be connected to the "F" terminal on your regulator.
    4) The BLACK wire on the "B" terminal of your regulator is the "BATTERY" and should be connected to the positive side of the battery either at the solenoid or at the battery post itself (via pigtail). This is your positive 12 volt source or supply for your regulator-generator circuit, so this BLACK wire is generally larger as well.

    Check this wiring and let me know what you find.
    Last edited by carussell; 11-27-2011, 04:24 PM.

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    • #17
      Hard to tell from the video, but it looks like one of the commutator bars may be burnt. I would hazard a guess that your generator is toast. You have two options: open it up and look, and then take it to an auto electric shop for repair; or take it in as is, and let them open it up. The shop would prefer you do the latter.

      Any good, long established auto electric shop will have the wherewithal to fix it, or quite possibly get you a whole new generator.

      Another option would be to order a modern internally-regulated alternator, fashion a strong bracket for it, and use that instead. Many, many Stude owners have done so. You have lots of room to work.

      Another note: your ammeter is only 20 - 0 - 20. A healthy generator can peg it out. A healthy alternator will peg it out. Suggest you replace it with a 40 - 0 - 40. They are inexpensive.
      Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands

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      • #18
        Is that the Generator making all that rattling sound?
        Check the brush springs to see that they firmly push the brushes into the armature.

        Among other things, I do not think that the charging circuit is going through that aftermarket Ammeter. It could be wired wrong, the current draw is all that seems to go through it.
        StudeRich
        Second Generation Stude Driver,
        Proud '54 Starliner Owner

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        • #19
          Thanks for the replies guys. Thanks carussell for the in depth guide on how my system should be hooked up! I haven't been able to find a great guide for how it should all be hooked together until now. I'll take a good look over it tomorrow.
          Yeah I'm pretty sure my gene the problem now. Hopefully it isn't toast Gord, I will ask around and see if any shops here can take a look at it.
          Hi again Rich, Yes that is the gene making that noise and it sounds horrible while driving. The brush springs are pretty strong. I am fairly certain my meter is hooked up right since it was registering correctly before the problem started happening unless it is wire that has gotten loose which I haven't located..

          I have seen the guides on how to change over to an alternator and think I could do it pretty confidently however I don't want to if it's in fact not the generator that is the problem.
          Thanks for all the help guys! I have really learned a lot.

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          • #20
            Originally posted by CodyC View Post
            ...Yes that is the gene making that noise and it sounds horrible while driving. The brush springs are pretty strong...I have seen the guides on how to change over to an alternator and think I could do it pretty confidently however I don't want to if it's in fact not the generator that is the problem...
            If the generator is actually making that much noise, then much that has been said already is moot. The noise indicates either the mating surfaces between the brushes and the armature contacts are not smooth or you have a bearing or bushing bad, or you have some unwanted something hitting the armature assembly internally as it rotates. With the front-to-back end play you could have a bad end-plate, bushing, or bearing. Open up the generator and look for signs of internal impact and wear.
            You may also want to perform some of the tests at the following link: http://www.studebaker-info.org/text3/gentest.txt
            Last edited by carussell; 11-27-2011, 07:01 PM.

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