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  • Engine: Engine & Transmission Replacement

    My 62 Hawk has got a problem with the transmission! It will not shift into high gear! There is no one in my area that wants to jump into this "Old" car!

    Has anyone ever installed a GM (Buick) 3.8 CID engine and transmission? Buick has rear wheel drivein a Regal 1988 thru 1996. The later ones had a four speed auto. Hopefully some one out there has tried this?

    I NEED HELP!

  • #2
    Through the automatic in the junk and put a 4 speed in it.

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    • #3
      There is no one in my area that wants to jump into this "Old" car!
      You're talking to the wrong people or asking the wrong question.

      Your Borg-Warner automatic transmission was used by Jaguar, Ford, AMC and others up into the '70s-80s. It's a very strong, durable and dependable as well as very common transmission and most any transmission shop should have seen one recently. All the parts were still available last I checked.

      Bottom line - ask them to work on Borg-Warner automatic, not a '62 Studebaker.

      jack vines
      PackardV8

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      • #4
        Do the basics: drop the pan, replace the filter screen, check the bottom of the pan for a large quantity of sludge, metal filings, or clutch debris. A thin film of fine black dust is normal; chunks of stuff, or a layer several business-cards thick is not.

        If the pan is basically clean, replace the filter, put fresh transmission fluid in it, and try it. If it works, fine; if not you could try a can of automatic transmission fix-it-in-a-can. If the problem is caused by a gummed-up valve in the valve body, the magic jam just might help.

        But as Jack says, any competent transmission shop should be able to service your transmission no problem. It's practically the same as the Ford cast-iron case Cruiseamatic. I'd say, contact some of your local street rodders, and ask them to recommend a shop. Where I live, several of the better tranny shops are run by street rodders.
        Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Leroy Cook View Post
          My 62 Hawk has got a problem with the transmission! It will not shift into high gear! There is no one in my area that wants to jump into this "Old" car!

          Has anyone ever installed a GM (Buick) 3.8 CID engine and transmission? Buick has rear wheel drivein a Regal 1988 thru 1996. The later ones had a four speed auto. Hopefully some one out there has tried this?


          I NEED HELP!
          Like my local transmission guy says, "if you can't fix a borg-warner automatic then you can't fix transmissions".
          sigpic

          1962 Daytona
          1964 Cruiser
          And a few others

          Comment


          • #6
            Leroy,
            The Studebaker Drivers Club is the largest auto marque club in the world and, Ohio is near the center of saturation, as far as Studebaker ownership is concerned. If your shop doesn't want to touch it, your shop is not competent.
            Contact members of your local SDC Chapter to find a mechanic who is not a recent graduate of your local tech school. I've seen certified mechanics who don't know how to drive a three-on-the-tree!
            There's an awful lot of help available to you if you have joined SDC and take advantage of your neighbor's experience.
            "All attempts to 'rise above the issue' are simply an excuse to avoid it profitably." --Dick Gregory

            Brad Johnson, SDC since 1975, ASC since 1990
            Pine Grove Mills, Pa.
            '33 Rockne 10,
            '51 Commander Starlight,
            '53 Commander Starlight "Désirée",
            '56 Sky Hawk

            Comment


            • #7
              Also Leroy keep in mind it will be FAR easier to fix what you have than to do an engine and transmission transplant. That can get very complicated and expensive, and when it's done the car will be worth less and even harder to fix when something goes wrong because nothing is standard anymore.
              Jeff DeWitt
              http://carolinastudes.net

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by ST2DE5 View Post
                Through the automatic in the junk and put a 4 speed in it.
                OUCH!
                Carl, that's harsh.
                While I personally favor a standard trans with overdrive, the automatic transmissions in those Studebakers were pretty much bullet proof.
                My '51 Commander still has its DG200 and it is just as strong and reliable as the day it was built. Don't throw out the baby with the bath water.
                "All attempts to 'rise above the issue' are simply an excuse to avoid it profitably." --Dick Gregory

                Brad Johnson, SDC since 1975, ASC since 1990
                Pine Grove Mills, Pa.
                '33 Rockne 10,
                '51 Commander Starlight,
                '53 Commander Starlight "Désirée",
                '56 Sky Hawk

                Comment


                • #9
                  Unless you are racking up 10,000 miles a year, and regularly making 500 mile trips, repair or replacement of the original Borg-Warner is simply the best and economical solution.
                  Second to that would be adapting a late model automatic with overdrive to the Studebaker engine, which has been done many times with very satisfactory results, but is quite expensive.

                  For several reasons, about the last choice would to embark on a complete engine & transmission swap. First, few modern engines are as durable, or as easily repairable or rebuildable as the Studebaker V-8, with reasonable care it will last for a million miles or more.

                  Secondly, if simply having a stock transmission repaired or replaced is beyond your ability or skill level, a complete engine and trans swap from an entirely different make of vehicle is not going to be any simpler or cheaper. Yes, the 3.8 Buick fits and is one of the easiest, but that doesn't equate with it as being desirable. Which brings us to the

                  Third consideration. A '62 Hawk is a very desirable model to many Studebaker fans and collectors, what is considered a modern classic. Any non-stock engine is going to reduce its desirability among those who are most inclined to desire it, and actually reduce its value among those who would otherwise be the ones most interested. And, unless you are an absolute super-salesman, any potential buyer 'in the know' will beat you down on your price come resale time.
                  Understood, you may not intend to ever sell it, or don't give a hoot if your 'improvements' cause it to lose most of its value during your ownership. That is up to you, your car, your money, your choice.

                  You came here asking forour advice. My contribution would be, get it fixed right and preserve its pedigree and value. OR sell it to a Studebaker enthusiast who will.
                  You can use the money to buy an old Buick.
                  Last edited by Jessie J.; 11-25-2011, 08:26 PM.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Replacement

                    OK I will check around on the problems of the transmission. I don't want to de-valure the Hawk! But I do want to drive it! I have a 78 MGB with over 320,000 miles on it. I bought it new. It was a pain in the neck for the first year. The Dealer had it more than I did. When the warranty ran out I had to learn to work on it myself. Five years ago I removed the original engine (that had been overhauled twice) and installed a V8 from a LandRover. (4.3) It also has a GM 5 speed stick and a S-10 rear end. It gets the same gpm as the original engine. It would take a large sum of money to have me part whith this vehicle.

                    I want to get this Hawk on the road and drive the whhels off of it! I just thought that installing the V6 would make this a dependable and economical vehicle. This would be a vehicle I would like to keep for myself. If I would elect to sell it the value would be up to the buyer. But I will attempt to get the trany checked out.

                    I also have a Pulse motor cycle and a King Midget! These keep me in the Garage working on them and off the streets! Thanks for all of your replies and I will try to keep everthing original!

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                    • #11
                      Different things for different people (and situations).

                      Me I decided to swap in a 350 Chevy and TH350 with a Ford 8" rear end into my 1962 Lark because everything needed work and I picked up the Chevy motor, etc. for a song. Too I used 1965-66 Stude 283 mounts which almost made the conversion plug 'n' play. Note my car already had the Chevy frame pedestal/hanging accelerator pedal pivot mounting holes---------from new.

                      The above stated: my Lark was a 259 car with a Data 27 rear end; had it been a Marshall (especially a 289 vehicle), I probably would have kept it 100% stock with the exception of installing at least a dual reservoir master cylinder and seatbelts. And dealing with a Hawk: unless the thing was either a basketcase or at least missing its original drivetrain, I would have kept its 100% Stude V8 power.
                      --------------------------------------

                      Sold my 1962; Studeless at the moment

                      Borrowed Bams50's sigline here:

                      "Do they all not, by mere virtue of having survived as relics of a bygone era, amass a level of respect perhaps not accorded to them when they were new?"

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Well, if a simple repair won't fix the existing transmission, and if you do plan on using the car lot, then the conversion to a modern TH-2004R or TH-700R4 would be the obvious answer. You can buy a kit to mate the GM tranny of your choice to the existing engine. You will have to have a driveshaft made, and make a crossmember for the rear tranny mount. And deal with speedo cable and electrical connections to the tranny. And a shifter! All said and done, it should run to less money than the complete power train swap you contemplate. Since there is a kit made for the purpose, and since others have done it, if you run into problems, there will be some help available.

                        Leaving the engine untouched, both fuel economy and acceleration should be much better. Buy an upgraded 4-barrel manifold from one of our vendors, and a 500 cfm Edelbrock carb from a speed shop, and it will run better still, And "mods" of this nature generally find favor in both the "stock" and "modified" camps at shows and meets. Nobody's going to point and laugh.

                        And I have unusual cars, too. How about a Crosley?
                        Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands

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