Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Front and Rear Seals on my 1963 289 Full Oil Flow Studebaker Motor

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Engine: Front and Rear Seals on my 1963 289 Full Oil Flow Studebaker Motor

    Hi Folks,
    I am about to tackle the Front and Rear Seal replacement on my 1957 Studebaker Silver Hawk.
    I'm very nervous as I have never done this before on any type of Motor. Any and all advice will be welcomed.

  • #2
    Is the engine out?
    Is the front (felt) seal actually leaking?
    Is the rear seal actually leaking?
    Do you have a friend who has done this before?
    What shape is the rest of the engine in?
    HTIH (Hope The Info Helps)

    Jeff


    Get your facts first, and then you can distort them as much as you please. Mark Twain



    Note: SDC# 070190 (and earlier...)

    Comment


    • #3
      I think most everyone's first suggestion would be to obtain a Studebaker Shop manual that covers your car. There are several sources for them, the easiest is Studebaker International. That book will provide very through instructions on the replacement of any gaskets or seals, and answer most any other mechanical questions you will encounter. Hope this helps.

      Dan Miller
      Auburn, GA

      Comment


      • #4
        Be very certain that your seals are leaking. I thought my engine (recently purchased, well used, was the normal external oiling engine. Then I realized I was filling the power steering every week. I had it rebuilt, (new bearings and seals) and now my '63 full flow engine is drip free. I couldn't believe it.

        Comment


        • #5
          Hi Deep,
          The engine is still in the car. I'm not sure if the Front or Rear is leaking. The motor was rebuilt about 22,000 mile ago two owners ago. Here is what I have done to try to find where it's leaking. I would drive the car and then I would pressure wash the bottom of the motor. I have a lift in my Garage. I would let it sit awhile and I see that the oil appears to be coming from the Rear of the Motor and a few drops from the Front of the motor. I have pulled the pan off to replace the pan gasket, but I am thinking I should just do the front and rear seals while I am at it. Again I am not sure if they even need replacing.

          Comment


          • #6
            That is interesting because I also suspect my power steering is leaking. Here is also my response to another person on this forum.

            The engine is still in the car. I'm not sure if the Front or Rear is leaking. The motor was rebuilt about 22,000 mile ago two owners ago. Here is what I have done to try to find where it's leaking. I would drive the car and then I would pressure wash the bottom of the motor. I have a lift in my Garage. I would let it sit awhile and I see that the oil appears to be coming from the Rear of the Motor and a few drops from the Front of the motor. I have pulled the pan off to replace the pan gasket, but I am thinking I should just do the front and rear seals while I am at it. Again I am not sure if they even need replacing.
            Thank you,

            Comment


            • #7
              I will do that.
              Thank you,

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Toolhead View Post
                I will do that.
                Thank you,
                Toolhead, no offence but when replying if you would use the 'Reply With Quote' button instead of the 'Reply' button, we would know who you are replying to. It's not just you, a lot of the guys are guilty of it. Me too sometimes. Just one of my many pet peeves.
                Jerry Forrester
                Forrester's Chrome
                Douglasville, Georgia

                See all of Buttercup's pictures at https://imgur.com/a/tBjGzTk

                Comment


                • #9
                  If you have the pan off already, it is easy to replace the rear seal, and that is likely where about 75 per cent of the leak is coming from.
                  Joe H

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I am about to tackle the Front and Rear Seal replacement. . . I'm very nervous as I have never done this before on any type of Motor.
                    If you have the pan off already, it is easy to replace the rear seal,
                    Easy for an old hand like Joe. Replacing the rear seal in the frame is NOT easy for a first timer!

                    jack vines
                    PackardV8

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Jerry Forrester View Post
                      Toolhead, no offence but when replying if you would use the 'Reply With Quote' button instead of the 'Reply' button, we would know who you are replying to. It's not just you, a lot of the guys are guilty of it. Me too sometimes. Just one of my many pet peeves.
                      Thank you for the info Jerry. Being new to this I am slowly learning.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by PackardV8 View Post
                        Easy for an old hand like Joe. Replacing the rear seal in the frame is NOT easy for a first timer!

                        jack vines
                        I agree Jack about the first timer! But the worst I figure is I could spoil a seal or two and have to do the job over. I have a long winter staring at me anyways.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Best advice I could give you is before you start, spend a long time cleaning up, under and around and a long time reading the Shop Manual.

                          jack vines
                          PackardV8

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Also make sure the PCV system is clear and operating, if it's equipped with one. If the system/valve is plugged up it could cause excessive crankase pressure to build up and create leaks where none really exist!

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              For the front seal I would use a modern urethane seal instead of the felt. Our vendors offer one that comes with a stainless steel sleeve in case your crankshaft has a slight groove in it. These can be done with the engine in the car without much trouble.
                              59 Lark wagon, now V-8, H.D. auto!
                              60 Lark convertible V-8 auto
                              61 Champ 1/2 ton 4 speed
                              62 Champ 3/4 ton 5 speed o/drive
                              62 Champ 3/4 ton auto
                              62 Daytona convertible V-8 4 speed & 62 Cruiser, auto.
                              63 G.T. Hawk R-2,4 speed
                              63 Avanti (2) R-1 auto
                              64 Zip Van
                              66 Daytona Sport Sedan(327)V-8 4 speed
                              66 Cruiser V-8 auto

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X