Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Painting.

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #31
    I have found using a higher temp thinner than the temperature calls for will slow down the drying process and allow the paint more time to flow out, cutting down on orange peel. One drawback is that it stays wet longer so debris and such has more time to collect on the paint job.

    "The more experience the more you learn what you do not know."
    don

    Comment


    • #32
      [QUOTE=kmac530;596548]
      Originally posted by wdills View Post
      IIRC were not Model As and Ts painted with a brush and a heavy laquer the colorsanded and hand rubbed to a thick durable finish?
      Anything is possible. Put enough on then sand enough off you can make just about any paint job look good.
      I don't know about As, but model T's were painted by dipping the fenders and running boards, and flow coating the bodies. The fenders and running boards were hung such that all runs were on the underside, and runs on the bodies were smoothed with a fine brush.

      Comment


      • #33
        Some on the HAMB have said they got very good results from the turbine painters. Anyone here tired one of those? Apparently very little over spray and faster drying time compared to conventional.
        Link to some posts about them: http://www.autobodystore.com/forum/a...php/t-893.html

        Comment


        • #34
          Originally posted by 5brown1 View Post
          Some on the HAMB have said they got very good results from the turbine painters. Anyone here tired one of those? Apparently very little over spray and faster drying time compared to conventional.
          Link to some posts about them: http://www.autobodystore.com/forum/a...php/t-893.html
          Actually, the turbine system technology was one of the earliest forms of "affordable" spray guns. They were available as far back as the '40's and 50's as an accessory attachment to vacuum cleaners sold back then. You simply switched the hose from the sucking side to the exhaust outlet and you had a spray gun! At that time, there were no California "tree-hugger" kooky legislation driving the motivation nor cutesy "HVLP" designation.

          With the legislation requiring no more than 10 PSI of air at the point of atomization of a spray gun, came the revival of using Cubic Feet Per Minute for atomization instead of Pressure Per Square Inch. One of the first and perhaps still the best of the turbine manufacturers is a company named Accuspray. I never sold their units but competed very successfully against them because most of my customers were industrial. Most of my customers rebelled against that huge vacuum cleaner size air hose. If you could imagine a large conveyorized spray operation with as many as 10 or more spray guns having to deal with those big air hoses, you would understand. That was when we began to develop guns that could be supplied enough high volume air through 5/16 and 3/8 diameter air hoses by increasing the air passages inside the guns. On these type of guns, it is not unusual to find 90 psi of air entering at the handle of the gun and only 10 psi at the air cap. Few of your little back yard compressors can supply enough air to accomplish this feat.
          John Clary
          Greer, SC

          SDC member since 1975

          Comment


          • #35
            Originally posted by avantilover View Post
            I think it was Bob Andrews who once used a roller, not too bad but not what you'd use for a really top quality job.
            OUCH, that hurts!! I would NEVER do that to any vehicle I had even a passing respect for Might be good for a demo derby car, but beyond that...

            You may remember me being involved in the discussion a few years back. There are proponents of the process, even a story about a guy that supposedly did this to a Charger and it came out wonderfully. Of course, I'm sure a few years on it has shown the effects of this cob-job. I was one of those amazed that anyone would ever think this to be a good idea for anything decent...

            I owned a collision shop for 20 years. I've been out of it for over a decade, but when my business property sells I want to go back to restoring cars, of course including paint. I still have my beloved old Binks 7s but will be looking into HVLP guns. But I give you my solemn promise, no shop vacs or leaf blowers... and NO rollers!

            I guess I can understand your mistake, though. Some say I've been known to be a frequent poster
            Proud NON-CASO

            I do not prize the word "cheap." It is not a badge of honor...it is a symbol of despair. ~ William McKinley

            If it is decreed that I should go down, then let me go down linked with the truth - let me die in the advocacy of what is just and right.- Lincoln

            GOD BLESS AMERICA

            Ephesians 6:10-17
            Romans 15:13
            Deuteronomy 31:6
            Proverbs 28:1

            Illegitimi non carborundum

            Comment


            • #36
              Wasn't there a thread several years ago about someone who had repainted an old fire engine with a roller? As I recall it turned out ok. Maybe it was one of those foam pads....

              Comment


              • #37
                Originally posted by Chucks Stude View Post
                Wasn't there a thread several years ago about someone who had repainted an old fire engine with a roller? As I recall it turned out ok. Maybe it was one of those foam pads....
                Many threads, but here's the one you're thinking of from ex-forum poster Guido:

                http://forum.studebakerdriversclub.c...-with-a-roller......
                Proud NON-CASO

                I do not prize the word "cheap." It is not a badge of honor...it is a symbol of despair. ~ William McKinley

                If it is decreed that I should go down, then let me go down linked with the truth - let me die in the advocacy of what is just and right.- Lincoln

                GOD BLESS AMERICA

                Ephesians 6:10-17
                Romans 15:13
                Deuteronomy 31:6
                Proverbs 28:1

                Illegitimi non carborundum

                Comment


                • #38
                  I've owned a Graco turbine for well over 20 years, 105 cubic feet per minute. lots of air no pressure. has a one inch diameter hose up to 50 feet. Better results with 25 feet. The air becomes very warm even slightly hot after 20 minutes or so. This then causes the paint to set up too quickly resulting in rough paint. I was never able to get it to perform properly so I now use it to supply lots of fresh air to my painting hood.
                  don

                  Comment


                  • #39
                    My SATA paint gun is not cheap, and has a digital pressure readout built into the handle. Proper tools for a proper job.My primer gun is 1/8 th the cost of my finish gun.
                    Bez Auto Alchemy
                    573-318-8948
                    http://bezautoalchemy.com


                    "Don't believe every internet quote" Abe Lincoln

                    Comment


                    • #40
                      "10 psi at the air cap"
                      well most of us don't actually know what the psi is at the cap
                      In any event, good luck with that
                      You want to paint? Make sure you have the right size tip for the paint... 1.4 ish for color 1.8 ish for primer, you need 2 guns
                      Agree with higher temp (slower) reducer...don't worry about dust you will be buffing it off
                      Do worry about runs 'cause they will ruin the job....
                      Cut back on reducer if possible....for example if shooting PPG Concept use 4:1:1 instead of 4:2:1.....less chance of runs
                      Orange peel is from not enough pressure or too thick paint
                      So crank up the pressure to 50-60 psi, with 100 psi feeding in from your compressor, thus atomize the daylights out of the paint, and keep the gun moving to avoid runs. Most people move the gun too slowly. Move it and get down 3 color coats so you can sand one off as part of the buffing process
                      The painter has 3 jobs: no runs, no fish eye (which is from petroleum or silicone based contamination....you shouldn't even store silicone products in your shop including that tire shine crap), and enough paint that it can be buffed.
                      Be sure to use a fresh filter ball, have some kind of water separator on your air supply even if you have to weld one up yourself, crack the drain valve on the compressor tank and leave it cracked, and do not paint on humid days
                      Be sure to use surface cleaner and plenty of it, and then a fresh tack cloth, one designed for auto painting, not furniture work like one guy I knew
                      Clean your gun like it was made out of gold
                      Test shoot the gun before each shoot using reducer or lacquer thinner on a piece of cardboard
                      Open the fan up to max except for small narrow areas, and test shoot on cardboard
                      You should be about 6-8 inches away from your panels and keep moving
                      Wear a good respirator or risk lung disease later in life
                      Be patient and allow the coats to flash properly....at least 20 min
                      Don't even think about painting below 60 degrees

                      If the painter can do all this, the buffer can take care of everything else. I taught 3 teenage boys how to shoot this summer and they did an awesome job on a TransAm for their Dad using these methods

                      and i don't want to know about california they are all crazy there! If you watch the movie, "Who killed the electric car", about GMs first electric, the Cali CARB board helped kill it, go figure. That board has way too much power and no science

                      Good luck
                      Last edited by tbirdtbird; 11-27-2011, 08:13 PM.
                      1947 M5 under restoration
                      a bunch of non-Stude stuff

                      Comment


                      • #41
                        One thing I might add is to keep the gun parallel with your work especially on the top. I really had a problem with the wagon I had the wheels off and setting on the floor. And I still got a bleed over in the middle. It will buff out. I have been keeping the pressure at the gun 45psi I will try the 50 to 60 next time.

                        Comment


                        • #42
                          ya 50-60 will keep peel to a minimum and make cutting/buffing much easier. the trick is to be able to shoot that close (8 in) and not run it, most people are afraid to shoot that close and pull back, but this 'dry sprays' it meaning not a good wet look, and thus a much tougher job cutting/buffing. You want as wet as u can get but no runs. Keep the gun moving!!!! Not only with your arms but walk it out. You'd be surprised at how fast I am moving. If inside, spray down the floor with water from a garden sprayer to minimize dust, works well. Grab an old fender and some cheap paint like black or something and practice. you need incredibly good light to paint a nice job. I have 30 4-foot double tube fl lites in my homemade booth (cross-flow) , more than most commercial booths, which I have also painted in, and I could still use more. You need to see the glare of the fresh path you just laid down. and yes be VERY parallel. Use a 50% overlap. If the car is low low to the ground jack it up onto blocks to get a comfortable working height. It will be well worth the trouble. In an ideal world you would have a clean break at the C or D pillar as well as the A pillar so that you could bag the car and shoot the roof first, then bag the roof and shoot the car, this allows U to adjust the vehicle height as needed since those are two very diff shoots. O/W you will have to blend the rear pillar. Or try to shoot the entire car at once which is not easy unless you have a painting buddy who can shoot as well as you and you can each take a side. As to cutting and buffing you'd be surprised how much trash (dust etc, even bugs do not try to remove them by hand unless they are big) you can cut and buff out, just don't get any runs or fisheye. I keep a spare gun loaded with reducer only that I use to chase runs with, doesn't always work, depends just where it is, but sometimes you can get lucky and chase it right off the car, works best on the lower sides. Again, get an old fender and practice all these tips, I got them all from a buddy who runs a high-end body shop and is the best shooter i know
                          Last edited by tbirdtbird; 11-28-2011, 09:29 AM.
                          1947 M5 under restoration
                          a bunch of non-Stude stuff

                          Comment


                          • #43
                            I would like to add a little to tbirdtbird's post. His advice sounds good if you are using single stage paint. I think base / clear is a little easier to spray. The base can be sprayed fairly dry and it doesn't matter. Spraying a little dry makes it easier to avoid runs and base tends to lay flat regardless of how you spray it. I spray my clear wet, and if I get a run I don't panic. It is very easy to use a razor blade to scrape the top off of a run and then sand and buff. I find it easier to fix a few runs during buffing than it is to do a lot of extra sanding on clear that wasn't slick to start with.

                            I know, the objective is to spray that perfect finish that doesn't have any runs or orange peel. But lets be honest, those of us that spray as a hobby rarely achieve that.
                            Wayne
                            "Trying to shed my CASO ways"

                            sigpic‚Äč

                            Comment


                            • #44
                              I too use my Sata for finish paint and a Cheap HVLP gun with a 2.0 tip for high build epoxy primer.
                              Good Roads
                              Brian
                              Brian Woods
                              woodysrods@shaw.ca
                              1946 M Series (Shop Truck)

                              Comment


                              • #45
                                One more issue for those of you attempting color sanding and buffing DO NOT TOUCH THE EDGES OR SHARP BENDS. Cover them with masking tape until the final procedures. Then do all that work "buffing" by hand and even then stay away from the sharp edges. Otherwise you'll cut through the paint immediatly. It a tedius job but necessary so you do not have to repaint. One hard swipe on an edge can go through.
                                don

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X