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Molasses rust removal?

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  • Body: Molasses rust removal?

    There is an Australian on YouTube that soaks rusted steel panels in a 1:9 ratio of sulphered molasses and water for about 2 weeks, then uses a pressure washer to remove the sludge. It appears to work. Has anyone here used this method?
    \"Ahh, a bear in his natural habitat...a Studebaker!\"

    51 Land Cruiser (Elsie)
    Jim Mann
    Victoria, B.C.
    Canada

  • #2
    Pretty well known. Seems to work as advertised, but I haven't yet tried it. There used to be someone that came to the Meets selling a molasses-based product, but I can't remember the name of it just now.
    Proud NON-CASO

    I do not prize the word "cheap." It is not a badge of honor...it is a symbol of despair. ~ William McKinley

    If it is decreed that I should go down, then let me go down linked with the truth - let me die in the advocacy of what is just and right.- Lincoln

    GOD BLESS AMERICA

    Ephesians 6:10-17
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    Illegitimi non carborundum

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    • #3
      Is Molasses that much cheaper than Naval Jelly?

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      • #4
        I saw a thread on a Datsun site about this. The guy bought the molasses at a feed store, not the store bought molasses. Cheaper than Naval Jelly and cleaner, not as toxic. Vinegar will work as well, just takes a long time.

        http://youtu.be/PhXcwRyGVsU

        Here is a link I googled

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        • #5
          Yes I have used it for years. It is called Treacle. Keep it in a plastic air tight container. I have not seen it remove paint yet. It will clean the smallest pits. Neal

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          • #6
            There's also beet juice rust remover...
            I remember Max Corkin (IIRC) selling it at Reedsville in 5 gallon buckets.
            Also, do an 'advanced search' here for 'rust removal' (Titles Only)... Active subject for all of Stude eternity....
            (That's why 'good' topic headers have such relevance)

            http://forum.studebakerdriversclub.c...earchid=628095
            Last edited by DEEPNHOCK; 11-22-2011, 06:29 AM. Reason: add link
            HTIH (Hope The Info Helps)

            Jeff


            Get your facts first, and then you can distort them as much as you please. Mark Twain



            Note: SDC# 070190 (and earlier...)

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            • #7
              FWIW, molasses is really nasty stuff to work with. I wouldn't use it again if you gave me a bucket. Don't ever leave a batch for a long time in warm weather!

              I've used molasses, beet juice, vinegar, and Evapo-Rust. This last, sold at Harbor Freight is by far the best liquid method.

              Read up on electroylsis. It is my preferred method for rust removal. Many detailed instructions available with a web search.
              PackardV8

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              • #8
                Electrolysis is my choice, for parts that will fit in a 5 gallon bucket, anyway. I kept a bucket going for a couple of months while re-habbing my '55 LC, everything from hose brackets to kingpins. A couple of pieces did one end then the other. I used a coat hanger wrapped around the inside of the bucket for an (anode or cathode) (had to replace it every couple of days) and a piece of brake line across the top of the bucket for the other -ode, connected to a 12 volt battery charger, forget which way, but change polarity if the coat hanger bubbles.

                Oh Yeah, put 1/2 cup washing soda in each bucketfull.
                Last edited by tbredehoft; 11-22-2011, 11:25 AM. Reason: to finish the formula.

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                • #9
                  I have tried the electrolysis method on smaller pieces. It seemed to work fairly well but required a lot of messing about, cleaning the electrodes etc. to keep the process going. It's also somewhat line-of-sight so it doesn't fully get all the areas unless you flip the pieces ariound.

                  I like the idea of throwing something into a bucket of molasses brew and just leaving it for a week or 2. However, I am impatient and would likely pull it out every day to see how it was going. A watched kettle never boils!

                  Cheers,

                  Jim
                  \"Ahh, a bear in his natural habitat...a Studebaker!\"

                  51 Land Cruiser (Elsie)
                  Jim Mann
                  Victoria, B.C.
                  Canada

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by DEEPNHOCK View Post
                    There's also beet juice rust remover...
                    I remember Max Corkin (IIRC) selling it at Reedsville in 5 gallon buckets.
                    Also, do an 'advanced search' here for 'rust removal' (Titles Only)... Active subject for all of Stude eternity....
                    (That's why 'good' topic headers have such relevance)

                    http://forum.studebakerdriversclub.c...earchid=628095
                    Thanks, Jeff.

                    Sometimes, I don't do a search because I'm also looking for a conversation as well as information. I am not able to attend most of my local chapter activities so I enjoy a chance to converse with strangers from all over Studedom.

                    Cheers,

                    Jim
                    \"Ahh, a bear in his natural habitat...a Studebaker!\"

                    51 Land Cruiser (Elsie)
                    Jim Mann
                    Victoria, B.C.
                    Canada

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                    • #11
                      I like the electrolysis method. I have been using a 30 gallon plastic garbage can which will take some fairly large pieces, but I am getting a plastic 55 gallon drum so I won't have to change the larger pieces around as much.
                      I use pieces of pipe hanging from the top of the container for one connection and they last quite a while. I usually hang the part from coat hanger wire with the other connection attached.
                      Last edited by 52-fan; 11-22-2011, 02:01 PM.
                      "In the heart of Arkansas."
                      Searcy, Arkansas
                      1952 Commander 2 door. Really fine 259.
                      1952 2R pickup

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by DEEPNHOCK View Post
                        There's also beet juice rust remover...
                        I don't recall Max selling it; maybe. There was another fellow demonstrating and selling at York. Packaged dry form in bags.

                        I guess any method you use is going to create a mess of some sort.
                        "All attempts to 'rise above the issue' are simply an excuse to avoid it profitably." --Dick Gregory

                        Brad Johnson, SDC since 1975, ASC since 1990
                        Pine Grove Mills, Pa.
                        sigpic'33 Rockne 10, '51 Commander Starlight, '53 Commander Starlight "Désirée"

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                        • #13
                          I use the electrolysis method with rebar as the -ode for medium sized stuff and Evapo Rust for the little stuff.

                          Terry

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                          • #14
                            Isn't a beadblast cabinet easier?
                            Good Roads
                            Brian
                            Brian Woods
                            woodysrods@shaw.ca
                            1946 M Series (Shop Truck)

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                            • #15
                              I picked up a large vibratory tumbler...used mostly for fasteners and smaller items....it isn't for cleaning, more for finishing the items after soaking and degreasing them...I use it with walnut shells...another nice system to work on things while you tend to something else...

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