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I love my new sanding blocks!

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  • Paint: I love my new sanding blocks!

    Now I know how the pros do it. The secret is in the length of the sanding blocks.

    On the weekend I blocked the primer/surfacer on my rear fenders using my new Dura Block sanding blocks. I thought everything was pretty straight but was amazed at how many imperfections came to light with the application of the longer blocks. 180 grit self-adhesive paper on a 16" long sanding block made things nice and flat in no time at all. The cylindrical block worked well for the concave areas and the thinner, more flexible block was great for the compound curves.

    The sanding block set was a great investment toward straight body panels. I am looking forward to a ripple-free shine when it's all painted up in Black Cherry!
    \"Ahh, a bear in his natural habitat...a Studebaker!\"

    51 Land Cruiser (Elsie)
    Jim Mann
    Victoria, B.C.
    Canada

  • #2
    now

    blow off the panel, apply a wet coat of wax and grease remover. Look down the panel , that is what it looks like when painted, look for imperfections guide coat may not show you.

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    • #3
      Mike,

      Sounds like you've done this before. Got any pictures of the finished product?

      Jim
      \"Ahh, a bear in his natural habitat...a Studebaker!\"

      51 Land Cruiser (Elsie)
      Jim Mann
      Victoria, B.C.
      Canada

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      • #4
        Over the years I have only taken a few pictures of the many cars I have done. Several hundreds of spot jobs and a hundred completes. I am just south if you wanna stop in......

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        • #5
          "blow off the panel, apply a wet coat of wax and grease remover. Look down the panel , that is what it looks like when painted, look for imperfections guide coat may not show you"

          No need to waste money on wax & grease remover, use water and look at it. Another thought, before you start blocking, use a black spray bomb and dust over a "light guide coat" so as you sand, the black will show the imperfections. You can also use a rubber squegee and look at the sand scratches and see where you have sanded.

          Jim
          "We can't all be Heroes, Some us just need to stand on the curb and clap as they go by" Will Rogers

          We will provide the curb for you to stand on and clap!


          Indy Honor Flight www.IndyHonorFlight.org

          As of Veterans Day 2017, IHF has flown 2,450 WWII, Korean, and Vietnam Veterans to Washington DC at NO charge! to see
          their Memorials!

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          • #6
            Yes, the longer blocks are the key.

            1st "major" resto and body work job I did was where I replaced a qtr panel on my '65 ford galaxie back in 1993-4 and used only one of those ~5-6" blocks to sand the filler over the 6' (!!) long welded seam. After painting it looks like a ruffles potato chip when sighted

            I'd heard of this book and picked up a copy soon after it came out:
            http://www.amazon.com/Modern-Techniq.../dp/087341571X

            A lot of good tips on blocking techniques in there.
            In that book, the author talks about making some of his own custom blocks from balsa wood that were several feet long for doing long panels.

            On my '53 I used 18" sanding board, 15" rubber blocks and a few assorted other special shaped rubber blocks I picked up to block the car. It turned out a LOT better than that galaxie. I am sure more experience on my part helped some too. Its kinda funny but I did quite a lot of work on the car with the paper wrapped around a old cardboard paper towel tube.

            Jeff in ND

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