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hints on removing the large Philips screws for door hinges?

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  • #46
    ya same damn job I got lol I am dreading the drivers door but it has got to be done if I want good sounding doors on the hot rod.when you look at it, ya it looks like a rat rod but it is was not intended to. I have got to get this thing looking nicer so I can stop hearing that title she god in certain circles

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    • #47
      Just to ease your pain....
      Things were no better in the thirties, either...



      HTIH (Hope The Info Helps)

      Jeff


      Get your facts first, and then you can distort them as much as you please. Mark Twain



      Note: SDC# 070190 (and earlier...)

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      • #48
        I LOVE THAT TRUCK IT IS THE BEST LOOKING OLD TRUCK I HAVE SEEN and it being a STUDE makes it even better!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! screw the screws that truck would look kick as hel* w/o doors,missing 1 wheel,other 3 are mismatched,flat,with a broken windshield,the tail gate rusted out John Deer Green,and the tail light lenses gone! I love that truck IT IS SICK AS HE**!!!! in other words, good job friend.

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        • #49
          I've done this one several times. It usually goes like this, soak liberally with penitrating oil, heat screw with map gas torch, slowly turn scew with a good snap on phillips socket and braker bar, spray penitrating oil while turning screw out then in a little, brake scew anyway, drill out broken screw and re-tap hole.

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          • #50
            Hinge Screws

            I wrote this earlier this year for the Met club newsletter and it sums up much of what has been posted already. Its the same for Studebaker's.




            Bill
            http://www.rustyrestorations.org/index.php
            sigpic

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            • #51
              After reading this and other threads on this topic, I set aside today for door removal on my coupe. In fact, I decided that I should probably just count on removing the driver's side door and count that good.

              I was all prepared to come in and brag, wondering why y'all were having such problems. Overnight soak in your favorite penetrating oil, a couple of sharp whacks on the impact driver with a shiny new #4 phillips bit installed, switch out to a ratchet to finish the removal of each bolts. Easy, right?

              Got the first door off in about 20 minutes. I couldn't believe my luck. Then, on the passenger side, I get to the last screw on the door and the magic is gone. I strip the center out of the screw in one turn. Argh. Again, no problem, I've read the threads here, so I'm prepared. Since I already have a 1/8th-inch bit in my drill, I start to drill out that last screw. Snap. No, not the bolt. My drill bit. and the tip of the bit is buried in the screw.

              I got lucky--all the screws where the hinge attaches to the A-pillar come off just as easily as the others. So I at least get my door off and will be able to get it to a position that is a little easier to work on. Guess I'll try welding a bolt onto that screw and see if that works. . .

              This is what happens when you're thinking about bragging about how easy this job was.
              Dave Nevin
              Corvallis, OR
              1953 Champion Deluxe Coupe
              Stud-e-venture blog

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              • #52
                One thing I had to do this week when I broke off the "easy-out" (good advice above; don't bother, I've hardly ever had one work, shouldn't have even tried it) trying to remove one of my seat-mount bolts thats head had sheared off. And they are hardened steel, so very difficult to drill. What to do?
                I took my oxy torch, heated the broken easy-out AND the bolt cherry red hot, and let them cool, and by annealing it, softened it (and also 'puddled it" a bit to make an easier drilling target.) Then I did the drilling routine on it, and it all drilled out slick as could be, just like instructed above. So, thinking you could do the same thing on your broken drill bit, which is also hardened and would need to be annealed before you could drill it out again. Been a LONG time since my metallurgy classes in college, but that made sense to me and seemed to work. Others might have better ways, but it sure is sickening feeling when that 'snap' occurs and you know you have a hardened piece of steel jammed in to make the situation worse than it was before!!

                Originally posted by dnevin View Post
                After reading this and other threads on this topic, I set aside today for door removal on my coupe. In fact, I decided that I should probably just count on removing the driver's side door and count that good.

                I was all prepared to come in and brag, wondering why y'all were having such problems. Overnight soak in your favorite penetrating oil, a couple of sharp whacks on the impact driver with a shiny new #4 phillips bit installed, switch out to a ratchet to finish the removal of each bolts. Easy, right?

                Got the first door off in about 20 minutes. I couldn't believe my luck. Then, on the passenger side, I get to the last screw on the door and the magic is gone. I strip the center out of the screw in one turn. Argh. Again, no problem, I've read the threads here, so I'm prepared. Since I already have a 1/8th-inch bit in my drill, I start to drill out that last screw. Snap. No, not the bolt. My drill bit. and the tip of the bit is buried in the screw.

                I got lucky--all the screws where the hinge attaches to the A-pillar come off just as easily as the others. So I at least get my door off and will be able to get it to a position that is a little easier to work on. Guess I'll try welding a bolt onto that screw and see if that works. . .

                This is what happens when you're thinking about bragging about how easy this job was.

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                • #53
                  I'll add to this thread, although it's not strictly on removing fender/door screws. The exhaust and intake manifolds of the Commander 6 are bolted together with four fasteners. Two are normal bolts and nuts, but two are stainless steel bolts (Studebaker calls them "screws" in the parts book) that screw into threaded holes in the exhaust manifold (to avoid interference with the heat riser). Well, one broke off, leaving no stub showing. Dirt and/or rust on the broken piece indicate that it had partially fractured a long time ago -- maybe when I bolted the manifolds together 30 years ago. Anyway, I have been carefully drilling and reaming out the remains with progressively larger bits and have had to resharpen them every couple of minutes. The hole through the miiddle of the bolt is only slightly off center on the bottom, so I am trying to carefully ream out the excess bolt remains without biting into the cast iron of the manifold.

                  The purpose of the this contribution is to note that I am not able to "pick the pieces of the screw out with a small chisel" or with anything else. In fact, the remains of the SS bolt seem to have become one with the cast iron manifold. I test-started retapping the top of the hole in the manifold, and no large shavings of bolt remains are being removed -- just dust-like particles. The new threaded area is completely shiny, and shows no evidence of old rusty threads. In fact, no line between the cast iron and the remains of the SS bolt is apparent. Not sure I'm asking for advice, just noting the difficulty of dealing this particular type of fastener. BTW, I've already purchased a lifetime supply of high-temperature anti-seize.
                  Skip Lackie

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                  • #54
                    Another good tip is to drill an 1/8" holle in the center before drilling off the heads, that way, you'll be able to center the drill with ease when drilling out the bolts.

                    Jim
                    "We can't all be Heroes, Some us just need to stand on the curb and clap as they go by" Will Rogers

                    We will provide the curb for you to stand on and clap!


                    Indy Honor Flight www.IndyHonorFlight.org

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                    • #55
                      Some previous owner had cammed out the heads on several of my door bolts, I used the heat method and a GOOD reverse twist drill bit, actually managed to get it to bite/heat enough to back most of the screws out, the ones that didn't back out got drilled out with the reverse twist bit and chased. I replaced the ones in the door with SS socket head flat head screws with some anti-sieze and replaced the pillar screws with good originals and ant-sieze. It should be easier to do next time in 2063....

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                      • #56
                        Where did you get the original hinge screws? I know the torx recommended above are more practical... but for me, I'd like to stay with the philips. I'll see that hinge every time I open the door. :-) I have not looked, just saw your note and thought I'd see where you found them.
                        thanks!
                        Barry
                        Originally posted by 63 R2 Hawk View Post
                        Some previous owner had cammed out the heads on several of my door bolts, I used the heat method and a GOOD reverse twist drill bit, actually managed to get it to bite/heat enough to back most of the screws out, the ones that didn't back out got drilled out with the reverse twist bit and chased. I replaced the ones in the door with SS socket head flat head screws with some anti-sieze and replaced the pillar screws with good originals and ant-sieze. It should be easier to do next time in 2063....

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                        • #57
                          Studebaker International and other vendors would have them.
                          Originally posted by bsrosell View Post
                          Where did you get the original hinge screws? I know the torx recommended above are more practical... but for me, I'd like to stay with the philips. I'll see that hinge every time I open the door. :-) I have not looked, just saw your note and thought I'd see where you found them.
                          thanks!
                          Barry
                          Frank van Doorn
                          Omaha, Ne.
                          1962 GT Hawk 289 4 speed
                          1941 Champion streetrod, R-2 Powered, GM 200-4R trans.
                          1952 V-8 232 Commander State "Starliner" hardtop OD

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                          • #58
                            The originals were ones were the oval head phillips I managed to salvage without damage. I only used the SS allen screws on the door where they are concealed.

                            Originally posted by bsrosell View Post
                            Where did you get the original hinge screws? I know the torx recommended above are more practical... but for me, I'd like to stay with the philips. I'll see that hinge every time I open the door. :-) I have not looked, just saw your note and thought I'd see where you found them.
                            thanks!
                            Barry

                            Comment


                            • #59
                              ahh, I understand. Several of mine are pretty rusted, (or broken), would not be lot of good threads remaining after running them through a die.
                              Thanks!
                              Originally posted by 63 R2 Hawk View Post
                              The originals were ones were the oval head phillips I managed to salvage without damage. I only used the SS allen screws on the door where they are concealed.

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                              • #60
                                Since most of my project is outside, I was running out of time and those doors had to come off. I had tried heat, impact, lots of penetrating oil, hammer gizmo etc. I drilled off the heads then took the doors to the drill press and drilled out the stubs in the back plate and re-tapped... replaced with 5/16 24 class 5 Machine bolts. The original bolts were quite soft and the desperation method did both doors in about 4 hours so I could move on.... When I get to the Speedster, I'll just start with this approach.

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