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hints on removing the large Philips screws for door hinges?

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  • Body / Glass: hints on removing the large Philips screws for door hinges?

    Hi,
    after trying to sandblast my floor sheet metal to see where the rotted area ends, I also realized I gritted up my door hinges. I had NOT been planning on taking them off. (they are square and I've welded angle irons to make an inner cage...)
    ANYWAY, now I am thinking I better remove them, and per other's posts on this forum remove the three screws for each hinge at the cowl pillar.
    QUESTION: how do I get these screws out without stripping out the Phillips insert slots??? I've tried to soak the inner threads of the 'screws' with WD-40 where I can get at them (all but lower one on each side).
    And where do I find a Phillips screwdriver bit that large (0.3 inch width!) that I can somehow mount in my impact wrench (unless someone has a better approach?)
    Thanks!!!!
    Barry

  • #2
    Phillips come in diff sizes. The most common we all use is a #2. Sounds like you need at least a number 3. Hardware stores and auto parts stores should have them. The harder issue is getting enough torque on them to make them move. KD tools and others make an impact type screwdriver. (an air impact wrench will not work for this since the tip just cams out of the screw head and strips it). Usually several types of bits come with the tool. Be sure you have a #3 or #4 tip avail for use w/ the tool. Be sure you twist the head of the tool in the correct direction (it is marked faintly on the tool). You twist one way to remove, other way to screw in. Once you twist in the correct direction, you take a 3-pound sledge and whale on the head of the tool...ONCE. The tool will jump 1/4 turn, and maybe turn the screw and maybe not. It may take several tries to loosen it. You have to re-set the twist EACH time you are about to hit it. By hitting it with a 3-pound sledge you are preventing the bit from camming out, and the force simultaneously initiates a torquing on the screw as well. So the tool simultaneously applies torque and pressure to keep the bit in. It is harder to describe what this tool does than to use it!!! I have never had this tool fail me. Suggest you chase all the male and female threads before you put it all back together, and use some Never seize
    1947 M5 under restoration
    a bunch of non-Stude stuff

    Comment


    • #3
      If you screw them up (as mine were when I got the car) drill them out with progressively larger bits up to 1/4" (better check that- might be 5/16). Then grind the end of a hacksaw blade until it fits in the hole and saw the remaining bolt fragment in a couple places and it will turn out easily with a straight blade screw driver. You can remove them pretty quickly this way. It might be faster than trying to remove them with an impact.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by bsrosell View Post
        Hi,
        after trying to sandblast my floor sheet metal to see where the rotted area ends, I also realized I gritted up my door hinges. I had NOT been planning on taking them off. (they are square and I've welded angle irons to make an inner cage...)
        ANYWAY, now I am thinking I better remove them, and per other's posts on this forum remove the three screws for each hinge at the cowl pillar.
        QUESTION: how do I get these screws out without stripping out the Phillips insert slots??? I've tried to soak the inner threads of the 'screws' with WD-40 where I can get at them (all but lower one on each side).
        And where do I find a Phillips screwdriver bit that large (0.3 inch width!) that I can somehow mount in my impact wrench (unless someone has a better approach?)
        Thanks!!!!
        Barry
        Barry

        If you mean an air driven impact wrench, Don't!! To easy to slip and round the phillips. If you mean this type of impact wrench DO!!!

        You can also use the drive end of the impact wrench (Not Air) which has a square drive end 3/8 inch, I believe, that you can use on a 3/8 drive socket wrench. Press as hard as you can on the socket wrench while trying to turn the screw is also effective.

        Also, don't be afraid to use heat, but if all else fails drill 'em out and rethread.

        The hammer impact wrench worked well on my 54K years back.

        Lastly, Sears used to carry the large bits you need but most impact wrenches have a large bit.

        Bob
        Last edited by sweetolbob; 11-05-2011, 02:26 PM.

        Comment


        • #5
          If I remember correctly these screws should be removed with a "posi drive" type phillips bit, it is somewhat more blunt in shape. Regular phillips will ususally strip the head out.
          Frank van Doorn
          Omaha, Ne.
          1962 GT Hawk 289 4 speed
          1941 Champion streetrod, R-2 Powered, GM 200-4R trans.
          1952 V-8 232 Commander State "Starliner" hardtop OD

          Comment


          • #6
            They are # 4 Phillips. The impact bit is a 5/16" shank. I used the air impact carefully with no problems on my 53 about a month ago. Just quick short bursts making sure you are pushing in hard to prevent slippage and strippage. Sears still sells a #4 5/16 shank attached to a socket base for about $6.50. The site below also sells them. The picture shows a #2, but the description says it's #4. 41 Frank might be correct about the posi drive. The newer impact wrench sets that I have found no longer contain the #4 bit.

            http://www.bettymills.com/shop/produ...referer=search

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            • #7
              Put vlave grinding compound on the tip. It will give you a lot of extra grip on the screw. I use it on every phillips head screw because I hate drilling them out. Aircraft panels have 40 to 100 screws each and It works.

              Comment


              • #8
                Thanks!!!

                Well, learn something new every day. Never saw one of those before, only 'impact' wrench I've ever seen is the pneumatics like mine.
                Just ordered a Lisle that has the #4 Phillips bit (according to a different companies add for same model, anyway.). And some extra spot-weld cutters; after doing three or four of them, I can tell I'm going to go thru a few of those bits before I'm done. :--)
                Thanks all!

                http://www.amazon.com/Lisle-30200-Ha...0546013&sr=8-3

                Comment


                • #9
                  It's difficult to justify not using heat on those screws first thing, before they get rounded off and impossible to work with.

                  Just use a torch to slowly pinpoint-heat the screw head carefully until it almost glows. A quick couple raps on the screwdriver bit being used will inevitably break the screw free with a minimum of fuss and frustration. BP
                  We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

                  G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I like the heat idea Bob. I have used the Lyle impact driver with limited success. It has a snap ring on the bottom that won't stay on when you whack it with a baby sledge more than a few times. A whack or two is never gonna get it with those hinge bolts. Be prepared for several dozen whacks. I used a heavy leather welders glove to hold the impact driver. It's not missed lick with the hammer that is the problem, it's just all the shock going on.

                    Heat would likely make things go easier. I wonder if a propane torch would get it hot enough?

                    Joe

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Original message
                      [QUOTE=JoeHall;590192....I have used the Lyle impact driver with limited success. It has a snap ring on the bottom that won't stay on when you whack it with a baby sledge more than a few times. ...............

                      Heat would likely make things go easier. I wonder if a propane torch would get it hot enough?

                      Joe[/QUOTE]
                      ===========================

                      re:snap ring failure - Are you twisting the handle all the way lefty-loosey before whacking it?

                      re: heat source - MAPP may do it. OxyAcetylene is the way to go.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Dan Timberlake View Post
                        Original message

                        ===========================

                        re:snap ring failure - Are you twisting the handle all the way lefty-loosey before whacking it?

                        re: heat source - MAPP may do it. OxyAcetylene is the way to go.
                        What Dan said. It can be done with MAPP if you are patient. Oxy-Acetylene is just faster. BP
                        We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

                        G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          another reason to justify having purchased my oxy-acy set a few years back, even though I don't weld with it..... :-) (bought it for re-riveting my Model-A chassis and you don't get 3/8" rivets red-hot with a little propane torch)

                          Thanks for the continued good advice. I look at those "deep, submerged" hinge screws on the center of each one and shudder as I consider if they spin and round out.... (and I very much dislike drilling and extracting screws, always seem to mess something up and make it worse, break the screw extrator off in there or something).
                          Good tips all, thanks.
                          Barry

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by bsrosell View Post
                            another reason to justify having purchased my oxy-acy set a few years back, even though I don't weld with it..... :-) (bought it for re-riveting my Model-A chassis and you don't get 3/8" rivets red-hot with a little propane torch)

                            Thanks for the continued good advice. I look at those "deep, submerged" hinge screws on the center of each one and shudder as I consider if they spin and round out.... (and I very much dislike drilling and extracting screws, always seem to mess something up and make it worse, break the screw extrator off in there or something).
                            Good tips all, thanks.
                            Barry
                            You can use an extension on your new impack tool. I have been using mine for over 25 years (and we use it a lot) Have never had a snap ring problem. But yes make sure you are turning it as hard left as you can when you hit it with you 2 lb sledge.
                            And please "everyone" quit thinking that WD40 is a penetrating oil.....IT is NOT! It does not work for loosening frosen bolts or screws!!!!!
                            Find Moovit if possibly can it is the miricle loosener!!!
                            Good Road
                            Brian
                            Brian Woods
                            woodysrods@shaw.ca
                            1946 M Series (Shop Truck)

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              absolutely use heat !!! then 1 rap with the above-mentioned tool and remove with a large phillips while hot.....

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