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Help with 53 Starliner

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  • Help with 53 Starliner



    I am having trouble with my 1953 Commander Starliner. I think it is a fuel line problem The picture above is the line between the fuel pump and the carb. At one of the bends the curve of the line is not as wide as the rest of the fuel line. Could this cause my car to cut out like it is starving fuel to the point it will stop running?
    Leading to vapor lock?
    Any help will be appreciated.




    Gary Sanders
    Nixa, MO
    President Toy Studebaker Collectors Club. Have an interest in Toy Studebakers? Contact me for details.
    Gary Sanders
    Nixa, MO

  • #2
    It does appear to be pinched rather tight. Why not cut the bend out and replace with a piece of rubber fuel hose as a test? Steel gas line is cheap to replace (unless originality is an issue--and even then) and if that is the cause it needs to be replaced anyway. Just my two cents.........

    wagone and the R2 Avanti

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    • #3
      Wagone,
      The more I look at the bend I agree it is to tight and I think it is restricting gas flow. I'm going to put a rubber hose in line tomorrow and see how it does.




      Gary Sanders
      Nixa, MO
      President Toy Studebaker Collectors Club. Have an interest in Toy Studebakers? Contact me for details.
      Gary Sanders
      Nixa, MO

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      • #4
        Might try a new steel line, and get a 90 degree fitting so the steel line does not need to bend in a U!

        Jim
        "We can't all be Heroes, Some us just need to stand on the curb and clap as they go by" Will Rogers

        We will provide the curb for you to stand on and clap!


        Indy Honor Flight www.IndyHonorFlight.org

        As of Veterans Day 2017, IHF has flown 2,450 WWII, Korean, and Vietnam Veterans to Washington DC at NO charge! to see
        their Memorials!

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        • #5
          A fellow can also buy a tubing bender at most auto parts stores for a few bucks. I have one, and it allows you to bend tubing quite easily without kinking it.

          1953 Chev. 210 Convertible, 261 6cyl w/Offy dual intake (But I always did love Studebakers!)
          1995 Dodge/Cummins Pickup, 250 HP, 620 Ft. Lbs. of Torque, ATS trans.
          1953 Chev. 210 Convertible, 261 6cyl w/Offy dual intake (But I always did love Studebakers!)
          1995 Dodge/Cummins Pickup, 250 HP, 620 Ft. Lbs. of Torque, ATS trans.
          Robert Rausch

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          • #6
            Those kinks are unsightly, but I doubt they are causing your problem. Think for a moment, how big is the inlet jet where the float needle seats? Probably well under 1/8", unless you have some kind of super high performance carb on there. There's the real bottleneck in the fuel line, and it's intended to be there. Do you really think those kinks are so tight as bring the interior of the line down to less capacity than the carb float valve?

            First step: under what conditions does the apparent fuel starvation occur? Engine cold or hot, idling or under load? After a hot shutdown? The circumstances will give you a clue. Vapor lock will normally only happen with a hot engine on a warm or hot day. Carburetor ice can occur if it's a humid day in the 30s F.

            A weak fuel pump is a possible cause; so is dirt in the fuel line, or in the valves of the fuel pump, or in the float needle and seat assembly. Since that's the real choke point, flaky or fibrous debris tends to lodge there.

            Another potential problem is a pinhole leak in the suction line from the fuel pump back to the tank. This can allow the fuel pump to suck air, and really mimics vapor lock.

            Even something like a leaf, dead bug, or scrap of paper floating around in the tank can occasionally block the pickup tube. Studes didn't use a filter sock on the fuel pickup tube like they have on modern cars, so they can be shut down by stray debris in the tank.

            Hope this helps. Post back with more details about the circumstances surrounding these stalling episodes.

            Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands
            Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands

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            • #7
              Ah yes, but a GOOD tubing bender is hard to find I like my "Imperial" brand benders, but I have no idea where to find them new. I have bought mine all used off eBay or at yard sales.

              True story, my grandfather used to be a tube fitter in a factory, and he was the guy that showed me how to bend and flare tube. (occasional brake repairs etc.) When he passed away my grandmother asked me if there were any tools I wanted and I asked about his tubing tools, apparently he'd sold them to a neighbor because he figured since I went to college and got a good desk job that I wouldn't have any use for them

              nate

              --
              55 Commander Starlight
              http://members.cox.net/njnagel
              --
              55 Commander Starlight
              http://members.cox.net/njnagel

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              • #8
                quote:Originally posted by N8N

                Ah yes, but a GOOD tubing bender is hard to find
                Try these Ezibend tubes...

                http://www.brakequip.com/tubes.html

                No tubing bender needed. Pretty nifty!

                NAPA here stocks them in various lengths.


                Dick Steinkamp
                Bellingham, WA

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