Announcement

Collapse

Get more Tips, Specs and Technical Data!

Did you know... this Forum is a service of the Studebaker Drivers Club? For more technical tips, specifications, history and tech data, visit the Tech Tips page at the SDC Homepage: www.studebakerdriversclub.com/tips.asp
See more
See less

Wheel backspacing

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Wheel backspacing

    Okay, I assume this has been addressed here before, but I am fairly new to the forum thing and have not seen it the short time I have been here.
    I want to replace the wheels on my Champ pickup (1/2 ton). I want to put 16" steel wheels on it. I would like to leave the front the stock width (It is hard enough to turn now, I don't need to make it any more difficult.), but I would like to go wider on the rear. What is the backspacing on stock truck wheels and how wide can I go on the rear of my truck?
    Thanks, Joe Roberts
    Joe Roberts
    '61 R1 Champ
    '65 Cruiser
    Eastern North Carolina Chapter

  • #2
    Start here ... I only know the passenger car offset.

    http://patriot.net/~jonroq/rjtechx.html

    Tom
    '63 Avanti R1, '03 Mustang Cobra 13" front disc/98 GT rear brakes, 03 Cobra 17" wheels, GM alt, 97 Z28 leather seats, TKO 5-spd, Ported heads w/SST full flow valves.
    Check out my disc brake adapters to install 1994-2004 Mustang disc brakes on your Studebaker!!
    http://forum.studebakerdriversclub.c...bracket-update
    I have also written many TECH how to articles, do a search for my Forum name to find them

    Comment


    • #3
      What is the passenger car off set and back-spacing? Two different animals I've heard. jimmijim
      sigpicAnything worth doing deserves your best shot. Do it right the first time. When you're done you will know it. { I'm just the guy who thinks he knows everything, my buddy is the guy who knows everything.} cheers jimmijim*****SDC***** member

      Comment


      • #4
        Take a rim and lay it on a flat surface. Using a straight edge, measure from the surface (inner plane) to the outer plane of the rim. That's, obviously, the entire width of the rim.
        Offset is measured using this width. Where the mounting area inside of the rim contacts the brake drum/rotor, in relation to the exact center of the total width, is considered your offset. If the mounting surface is closer to the outside of the rim, then you have positive offset. If it's closer to the inside of the rim, then it's negative. Offset is usually given in millemeters (mm) FWD cars usually have zero or negative offset. RWD cars usually have positive offset ( +20, +35, etc)
        Backspace is measured from the inside plane to the mounting surface and is usually described in inches.
        Here's the kicker, though. if you have a 15X6 rim, the "6", is measured inside the bead seat, where the tire bead sits. There's a bit more meat to the rim, as there's the lip that holds the side of the bead in place. Both sides generally total about an inch, so your 15X6 rim is really 7 inches wide. Using this figure as a rule, will give you a better idea on where your offset is, in relation to the backspace. IE, 15X6 = 7 inches wide. Zero offset is at 3.5" backspace. A +15mm offset on the same rim will give you 4 1/8" backspace and place the rim farther under the fender, than a zero offset.
        64 GT Hawk (K7)
        1970 Avanti (R3)

        Comment


        • #5
          Thanks for your explanation. jimmijim
          sigpicAnything worth doing deserves your best shot. Do it right the first time. When you're done you will know it. { I'm just the guy who thinks he knows everything, my buddy is the guy who knows everything.} cheers jimmijim*****SDC***** member

          Comment

          Working...
          X