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  • Steering: Power Steering

    I have a restored 1959 4E series truck. I would like to add power steering. Kits are made for Ford, Chevy, etc. Does anyone have any experience with this. I don't want to replace the front end as most hotrodders do. Thanks

  • #2
    Several of us have used GM full-size rear drive car steering gearboxes. It's not a bolt-in, requiring a custom bracket and modifications to the stock column and shaft, or the GM column. If you have some fabrication skills, it works well, easy to find in a Pick-N-Pull yard. There are fifty different Pitman arms, so it is possible to make them fit several different engine combinations.

    jack vines
    Last edited by PackardV8; 10-16-2011, 01:13 PM.
    PackardV8

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    • #3
      Which GM steering boxes are you using? Also what mods are required? Thanks -Jim

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      • #4
        Most all the '70s-90s GM rear drive cars use the same steering box. Some thoughts:
        1. I'd never attempt this project with the engine in the truck. Fabricating the mounting bracket requires being able to see what is going on down there.
        2. It requires basic welding skills. Steering is not the place for "maybe it'll hold."
        3. The Pittman arm must be pulled off it's shaft and rotated about ninety degrees for the Stude setup.
        4. There are many different Saginaw Pittman arms. If the one which comes with the box you get isn't ideal, the Pick-N-Pull yards have many from which to choose.
        5. I've used both the Studebaker PS pump and the GM pump. Some of the later GM pumps went to metric fittings, so new hoses or adapters might be needed.

        Bottom line - it's the best, most-cost-effective solution I've found, but it isn't an easy bolt in.

        jack vines
        PackardV8

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        • #5
          Thanks Jack. Sounds like you have the ticket. Although you strongly suggest not doing the job with the engine in place, would it be feasable to do so if working on a lift and able to work back and forth from the top and bottom? What pulley have you used to get the extra belt? Is mounting a GM pump best done by fabricating one's own brackets or are some available? When cutting column and shaft, I assume the steering column is removed. Are there any complications with the shifting mechanism? (approximately how much is removed from the column)
          Thanks Rod

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          • #6
            What pulley have you used to get the extra belt?
            You didn't state, but maybe your truck is a 6-cyl? I don't do those, so someone else will have to help with that. The V8 setup is obvious - just use what Stude used.

            Although you strongly suggest not doing the job with the engine in place, would it be feasable to do so if working on a lift and able to work back and forth from the top and bottom?
            It's theoretically possible, but will be incredibly difficult.

            Here's a link to a photo which shows the mounting bracket I did my most recent C-cab PS.
            https://picasaweb.google.com/lh/phot...eat=directlink

            The GM boxes all have a stub spline shaft at the top. The Stude collar and shaft could be cut and a lower bearing fabricated, then the end of the Stude steering shaft mated to a GM double-D rag joint. Since I'm usually doing customs, I just use a GM column.

            jack vines.
            Last edited by PackardV8; 10-17-2011, 02:57 PM.
            PackardV8

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            • #7
              Thanks again Jack. OK I get it. I won't try it until the engine is removed. It is a stock V8 by the way. Rod

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