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Body Trim, Korean Chrome, Unatainium 1952 Starliner Belt-line

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  • Body / Glass: Body Trim, Korean Chrome, Unatainium 1952 Starliner Belt-line

    So if you found yourself missing one piece of a set you can search and network in hopes that in time one will surface. Or one could make yourself one. First I made pattern using Duraglass body filler which was cast into a rough mold made from modeling clay.
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    The Duraglass pattern was shaped by hand and painted to make a smooth surface.
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    The pattern was used to create a mold in sand and a spare piece of 1952 trim was melted down and......
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    ...... poured into the sand.
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    Once sufficiently cooled the new part is pulled from the sand.
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    Continued in next post.

  • #2
    After some time with a burr grinder the part is cleaned up ready for hand finishing before plating.

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    And the PS is as this process was coming together a forum member who know I was looking for this part put me in touch with another Studebaker enthusiast who as it turned out has one and agreed to make it available to me. So now the race is on to see which will make the final cut.

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    • #3
      Great job!

      You know what will happen now when you get this part all done.....

      .... suddenly more of them will pop up out of the woodwork!!

      Jeff in ND

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      • #4
        Been thinking of doing this but hadn't thought out the mechanics.... Thanks for filling in some blanks.... I may have to do this.

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        • #5
          I commend you for your over and above effort. jimmijim
          sigpicAnything worth doing deserves your best shot. Do it right the first time. When you're done you will know it. { I'm just the guy who thinks he knows everything, my buddy is the guy who knows everything.} cheers jimmijim*****SDC***** member

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          • #6
            Holy cow, that's the way to get it done. And you really used 1952 pot metal to make the new piece? There's is some poetic justice there.
            Hey, check your PM too, I got an email yesterday about a rough 52 hardtop for sale. But he didn't say where the car was at, so I'm waiting to hear more from him.

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            • #7
              I gotta say... I feel inadequate just looking at your pictures

              Seriously... what a great job!

              Clark in San Diego | '63 Standard (F2) "Barney" | http://studeblogger.blogspot.com

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              • #8
                Well done. 52 parts are hard to come by. You may be in demand!
                Dave Warren (Perry Mason by day, Perry Como by night)

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                • #9
                  On casting pot metal,do you have to allow for shrinkage in the mold ? I know you do on all.and brass but dont know on pot metal.

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                  • #10
                    Chipmaker: I am sure a true foundry guy/pattermaker would have calculated a percentage but for mine I just took a shot. I think the shrinkage was less than three percent, so the pattern was a little oversize knowing I wanted to be able to handwork it to size and finish. There are many youtube videos for back yard/DIY casting, mostly in aluminum. It isn't any harder than it looks. If it doesn't work the first time (this one did) you can do it over with only some lost time and propane. I am a retired machinist so the idea of making things often leads me astray.

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                    • #11
                      COOL. Could you do this for the guy that's been looking for the pieces for his Lark convertible for...forever? Who was that? They were cast pieces around the rear convertible section.
                      KURTRUK
                      (read it backwards)




                      Nothing is politically right which is morally wrong. -A. Lincoln

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by kurtruk View Post
                        Could you do this for the guy........
                        I am a rank armature at casting. That said anyone who can read and see with access to the Internet or a library could do it provided the part in question isn't too large or complicated. Large and or complicated would take more practice. The materials cost around a $100 (maybe less). The satisfaction of doing it for yourself take all the work out of it. I'd hope that the guy with the Lark convert or anyone else would look at the idea and gather his friends and among them they would give it a shot.

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                        • #13
                          fatboylust, please check your PMs.

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                          • #14
                            I know this is an old thread but I noticed a video on YouTube with a 52 Commander hardtop in a junkyard. I'm not sure where it's at but it has lots of trim on it yet.

                            https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eNQviONgVPc


                            Edit- guy has an extremely rough '64 Commander from the same guy that owned the '52 and was talking about listing the two on craigslist in that video. This was in January so who knows if they're still around.
                            Last edited by Bordeaux Daytona; 03-23-2020, 05:39 AM.

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                            • #15
                              I posted an original 1952 Land Cruiser the found portion of the forum. Car had been in a garage since 1965, unmoved seemed to be rust free, low miles, beautiful dash and complete, but with some body damage. The price was right, free. After three weeks finally found a local taker, only to find that three days previously the car had been towed. I understand the car is still available but it won't be free anymore!

                              Bill

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