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  • Rear Axle: dana 44

    in the 60 lark 8 qwho made the dana 44? I was looking for a spool and the q, was Chrysler or dana. I didn't know they both made them lol

  • #2
    Dana made the Dana44.
    Before you stuff a spool in there, look at your axle ends.
    If there is a nut holding the hub onto the axle...Don't waste your money on a spool...yet.
    If your car is on jackstands, rotate the rear wheel and look at the other wheel.
    Do they both rotate the same way? Or do they rotate opposite directions?
    (This is one way to tell whether you have a posi, or an open diff)
    Or....
    Pull your diff fill plug and stick your finger in the hole.
    If it goes in to the first knuckle, it's a TT.
    If it goes way in...it's an open diff.
    But...
    Buy a set of 'flanged' axles and put them in first.
    You can get a Dana 44 'mini spool' to convert an open diff into a locked diff pretty easy.
    But a locked diff, or spool is just goofy for the street.
    Go around a corner when the road is wet...just once, and you will know what I am talking about.
    Better off to find a 'Twin Trac' Stude rear with flanged axles...
    Bolt in deal, and it will handle your horsepower....maybe

    BTW.. Dana is still the largest supplier to the OEM car industry today.
    They make diff's, stamp frames...you name it, they make it...


    Originally posted by mookandairin View Post
    in the 60 lark 8 qwho made the dana 44? I was looking for a spool and the q, was Chrysler or dana. I didn't know they both made them lol
    HTIH (Hope The Info Helps)

    Jeff


    Get your facts first, and then you can distort them as much as you please. Mark Twain



    Note: SDC# 070190 (and earlier...)

    Comment


    • #3
      The Dana Corporation manufactured rear axle assemblys for many years, for many car and truck manufacurers, including Studebaker. Chrysler Corp. not only used the Dana axle, but also had theit own axle for cars and 1/2 ton pickup trucks. The Dana model 60 was used in their extreem high performance cars in the mid 60's through the early 70's. Hope this helps.

      Dan Miller
      Auburn, GA

      Comment


      • #4
        For more than sixty years, the Dana 44 has been the most widely used rear axle ever. Besides Studebaker, Ford, GM, Mopar, Jeep, International, Jaguar, Sunbeam; indeed most every OEM used the Dana 44 at one time or another.

        FWIW, I find 4WD shops a great place to find Dana 44 parts. They build them every day for serious off-roaders.

        jack vines
        PackardV8

        Comment


        • #5
          thanks for the info fellas, I know a spool is dumb for the street but I am going for the track 95% of the time so it will not be on the street but for a min.The 4x4 shops are a great place to get parts I found as you stated so thanks for helping me there! this is an invaluable site I got to say for info on the Stude's for sure.you all are the "cats meow" when it comes to info that is for sure.

          Comment


          • #6
            A nice tight normal posi. might be a better way to go.

            When setting up the rear in my 60 Lark wagon (550 hp small block Chevy), I thought about a spool...for about 10 seconds.

            I remembered a Dana posi. a friend setup VERY tight back in the late 60's that somehow, I ended up with. This was in a 62, A/S 409 Impala back then. It would pull the front tires up 18" every launch.
            Anyway, many, MANY years later I put it in my 61, 409 that I built. Quite a fun car overall. Handled well in the corners too..!
            To make a long story short...you just may grow to hate it..! At first, the squealing inside tire (going around corners) was fun. Then it got ot be well...ok. Then it turned into watching out for the cops even going 5mph with the inside tire squealing going around every corner. I left it in for about a year because it wasn't my daily driver. I put larger axles and a stock posi in and as they say....never looked back.

            The change made the car a LOT...easier to drive, and changed nothing on the drag strip..!
            Unless you've done this before...you'll find the solid rear feels like it wants to twist and wind the car into knots at any little twist of the steering wheel. If you go ahead with this...make sure your rear end....THE WHOLE BACK HALF.....is up to the task of handling the extra load that a stock rear end was never designed for.

            If you still have leaf springs....keep the AAA card very close at hand...!

            Mike
            Last edited by Mike Van Veghten; 09-11-2011, 10:34 AM.

            Comment


            • #7
              One CASO way to tighten up a Dana posi is to put an extra flat plate in the clutch pack....
              Almost acts like a locker then.....
              BTDT
              Jeff

              Originally posted by Mike Van Veghten View Post
              A nice tight normal posi. might be a better way to go.

              When setting up the rear in my 60 Lark wagon (550 hp small block Chevy), I thought about a spool...for about 10 seconds.

              I remembered a Dana posi. a friend setup VERY tight back in the late 60's that somehow, I ended up with. This was in a 62, A/S 409 Impala back then. It would pull the front tires up 18" every launch.
              Anyway, many, MANY years later I put it in my 61, 409 that I built. Quite a fun car overall. Handled well in the corners too..!
              To make a long story short...you just may grow to hate it..! At first, the squealing inside tire (going around corners) was fun. Then it got ot be well...ok. Then it turned into watching out for the cops even going 5mph with the inside tire squealing going around every corner. I left it in for about a year because it wasn't my daily driver. I put larger axles and a stock posi in and as they say....never looked back.

              The change made the car a LOT...easier to drive, and changed nothing on the drag strip..!
              Unless you've done this before...you'll find the solid rear feels like it wants to twist and wind the car into knots at any little twist of the steering wheel. If you go ahead with this...make sure your rear end....THE WHOLE BACK HALF.....is up to the task of handling the extra load that a stock rear end was never designed for.

              If you still have leaf springs....keep the AAA card very close at hand...!

              Mike
              HTIH (Hope The Info Helps)

              Jeff


              Get your facts first, and then you can distort them as much as you please. Mark Twain



              Note: SDC# 070190 (and earlier...)

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by DEEPNHOCK View Post
                [B][COLOR=navy]One CASO way to tighten up a Dana posi is to put an extra flat plate in the clutch pack....]
                I was just about to post a similar response. When our chapter (Hudson Valley) built a 1964 Daytona to be a drag car, that could go on the street to get there, we added an extra disc to the Twin Traction pack.
                Gary L.
                Wappinger, NY

                SDC member since 1968
                Studebaker enthusiast much longer

                Comment


                • #9
                  Great minds think alike!

                  Originally posted by studegary View Post
                  I was just about to post a similar response. When our chapter (Hudson Valley) built a 1964 Daytona to be a drag car, that could go on the street to get there, we added an extra disc to the Twin Traction pack.
                  HTIH (Hope The Info Helps)

                  Jeff


                  Get your facts first, and then you can distort them as much as you please. Mark Twain



                  Note: SDC# 070190 (and earlier...)

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    mine is not a possi tho

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