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  • Brakes: rear brake drums

    Ok i took everyones advise and took my 62 hawk to a local brake shop.These guy have been around for a while and have a great reputation.They are telling me they cant get the rear drums off.They have been trying for 2 days now with two different pullers, no luck. Are they missing something? Any good (or bad) ideas will be appreciated

  • #2
    PM Sent to your email
    64 GT Hawk (K7)
    1970 Avanti (R3)

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    • #3
      You could take the guy a Shop Manual. If he's still lost, I'd find another shop.
      Joe

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      • #4
        Make sure they're aware the drum and hub come off together. They may be trying to pull the drum off by itself, the way most cars are done. Tapered axles with removable hubs have been obsolete for some time, and it's possible they've never seen one.
        I had a bad experience with this recently. The shop I use for my late model stuff ruined my rear drums because their lathe wouldn't work with my hubs/drums. They pulled the drums off the hubs, turned them, then reinstalled them on the hubs. The result was the drums were not concentric with axles when done. Explain to them the hub and drum come off together, and are turned together. If your hubs don't fit their lathe, take them to someone else.
        Dwight 54 Commander hardtop

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        • #5
          Studebaker's brakes used the same technology and were built by many of the same companies (Bendix, Wagner) as other car manufacturers. But Stude did retain the tapered axles a little bit longer than many of the others. As noted in other threads, these axles require the use of a puller that pulls on the studs, not the drums. If they are using the correct puller and have backed off the adjusters and the drums still won't come off, a trick is to disconnect the wheel cylinder from the back of the backing plate and push if free from the shoes. But before I'd engage in a lengthy discussion with them, I would consider finding another shop.
          Skip Lackie

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Skip Lackie View Post
            Studebaker's brakes used the same technology and were built by many of the same companies (Bendix, Wagner) as other car manufacturers. But Stude did retain the tapered axles a little bit longer than many of the others. As noted in other threads, these axles require the use of a puller that pulls on the studs, not the drums. If they are using the correct puller and have backed off the adjusters and the drums still won't come off, a trick is to disconnect the wheel cylinder from the back of the backing plate and push if free from the shoes. But before I'd engage in a lengthy discussion with them, I would consider finding another shop.
            True. Chrysler kept their tapered axles almost as long as Studebaker; 1964 was the last year for Mopar although the A bodies (Dart/Valiant/early Barracuda) went with slide off drums on at least their 9 inchers from the beginning (1960).
            --------------------------------------

            Sold my 1962; Studeless at the moment

            Borrowed Bams50's sigline here:

            "Do they all not, by mere virtue of having survived as relics of a bygone era, amass a level of respect perhaps not accorded to them when they were new?"

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            • #7
              Mid '60s doesn't seem old to us gray beards, but that's 45 years ago. There are 20 and 30 something techs at brake shops that have never seen tapered hubs. Just make sure they're not trying to pull your drum off the hub.
              Last edited by 1954khardtop; 09-10-2011, 11:46 AM. Reason: can't subtract or spell.
              Dwight 54 Commander hardtop

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              • #8
                Studebaker Parts has the puller for loan. Here is their discussion of Studebaker brake pullers.
                http://www.studebakerparts.com/stude...eelpuller.html

                But, most important follow their instructions... last paragraph on the above that I copy below:
                "PLEASE FOLLOW THE INSTRUCTIONS
                WHEN YOU USE THIS PULLER, I REMOVE THE AXLE NUT, PUT ALL four WHEEL NUTS ON THE HUB LEAVING ABOUT 3/8" CLEARANCE BETWEEN THE PULLER AND THE HUB. NEXT HAND TIGHTEN THE CENTER BOLT OF THE PULLER AGAINST THE AXLE. NEXT YOU CAN USE A 1/2" DRIVE RATCHET WITH A 3/4" SOCKET AND TIGHTEN ALL THE WHEEL NUTS A LITTLE AT A TIME IN SEQUENCE
                THIS EVEN PULLING EFFECT WILL LOOSEN THE DRUM QUITE EASILY "

                I used their puller and their instructions on 2 vehicles whose last license plate was 1968 and 1970 respectively. I pulled all four drums in an hour and a half !

                Just remember to re-attach the large center nut loosely. This technique required very little effort but the drums came off like a shot out of a cannon.

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                • #9
                  Thanks, this makes sense to me. I will look for a new brake shop an pass on this info, hopefully I can find one with some "old guys" still around.

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                  • #10
                    I seem to remember tapered axles used on Jeeps through the 80s as they used the type 44 axle too. My axle hubs wouldn't budge until I used the correct puller and heated them up some. Funny, you hear different ways to remove the stubborn tapered axle hubs. I have a '41 Lincoln Continental Cabriolet and some people on that forum and the old Ford forums say some people loosen up the axle nut a bit and drive the car around some sharp corners until they hear the hub "POP" loose. Not for me but some people have done it for years.

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                    • #11
                      At risk of upsetting some vendors, I will say that JC Whitney has pullers for Stude drums: Part# QQ510236 is their "cheapie" at $35.99, but will do the job on all but the most difficult drums. It usually requires more whacks with a BFH (big friendly hammer due to its coarser threads and resultant lesser pulling power. I used one of those for years before it finally gave out. JCW part # QQ128895 is their HD version, and $63.99. It is beefier, and has finer threads for more pulling PSI. It is what I use nowdays, and it is what some vendors offer.
                      If you could bite the bullet and buy one, then take it to the shop for the repair person to use, that may give them a clue as to what the job entails while also providing a (must have) tool they likely do not have on hand. If the person appears dazed or confused, I'd take it to another shop.
                      Also, because whacking with a BFH can cause the axle end to distort mildly, I leave the nut on the axle (very loosely) while using the puller.THe nut will correct the distorted threads when screwing it off after the hub pops loose.
                      Joe

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                      • #12
                        Do not tighten the puller screw to remove the drum! Snug the center screw up finger tight. Leave the lug nuts 3/8" loose then tighten the lug nuts in rotation. This insures an even pull as well as developing more torque/leverage due to the finer thread and working slightly from side to side. After getting the lug nuts good and snug, give the puller center screw a good wrap with your 5 pound hammer and it will pop right off. Think of this technique as starting off on an up grade in 1st gear. If you try and remove it the obvious way by tightening the center screw you have all the torque of starting off on a grade in 3rd gear.

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                        • #13
                          Leave the nut on , without the washer.
                          This will prevent the drum from flying off and hit you in the nuts.
                          Leave the nut loose so that it will have room for the drum to move off the taper.
                          Use the center screw but make sure you use some high pressure grease on the threads.
                          Machinist know this as "center lube"
                          Tighten up the center screw and when you can not tighten it anymore , hit the end of the center screw with a sledge hammer.
                          Then tighten some more and hit again etc.
                          One hard to get off drum came off when I gave up for the night and left the pressure on the center screw.
                          The next morning I found that it had popped off during the night.

                          Robert Kapteyn
                          Last edited by rkapteyn; 09-11-2011, 04:31 PM.

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