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Modified clutch pedal for hydraulic clutch

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  • Clutch/Torque Converter: Modified clutch pedal for hydraulic clutch

    Having switched my trans. in my 54C from automatic to T5 standard with SBC, I could not find a whole lot of information to install a hydraulic master/slave to operate the clutch. Here's what worked for me. The trans. swap was pretty much straight forward, rear mount was fabbed and welded to the 'bat wing' crossmember, hole was cut in the floor for the shifter, and I had to notch the crossmember that sits under the bell housing to clear the clutch fork because I used a bell housing from a 3rd gen. Camaro that clocks the whole transmission CCW.


    I used a Wilwood 260-3378 remote master cylinder kit, 1" bore which is the same bore as the Camaro slave cylinder. This master cyl. is great because it gives 2 mounting options, either on the front or on the side. I chose side mount.



    I mounted the remote resevoir on the driver's side of the engine compartment beside my previously installed remote resevoir for the brakes.



    I made a bracket out of 1/4" plate that bolts to the frame using the end of the bolts from the brake master cylinder bracket. There are a few large fender washers that stand the bracket off of the frame. There are tabs welded on the back side of the bracket to stop the heads of the clutch master cylinder bolts from spinning because you can't get a standard thickness wrench behind the bracket.



    I made a lever arm from 1/4" plate and welded it to the stock Stude swivel...guess I could have welded it directly to the pedal shaft, but I wanted it to be easy to R&R incase I needed to change the length of the arm. The length of the arm from hole center to hole center is 40mm, that gives me the 17mm of master cylinder piston travel that I needed, plus a couple of mm for clutch pedal travel from the floor of the car. Clutch take-up is progressive, extremely smooth, a little on the heavy side but still way less leg force required than to say stop the car with manual brakes. I was in rush hour traffic with it and had no problem with 2 billion start n' stops it took me to get home. lol.



    The biggest problem I ran into was the stupid plastic hose/aluminum fitting that goes into the stock GM slave cylinder and is held in place with a roll pin. I had no idea how I was going to interface that with a standard double flair steel line that I was planning on running from the master cyl. After some searching, here is the slick solution. This adapter fitting is intended for Chrysler/Jeep products, but if you turn down the part of the fitting that retains the seal, it slips right into the GM slave cylinder. The GM fitting has no lip to retain the seal. See measurements and part # in photo. I've been told that Macleod Clutches makes the same fitting, but it's twice the cost. I looked on their website, but couldn't find such a part. The Russell fittings were $22 a pair, not cheap but what's a guy to do? I use an AN#3 hose with 2 female fittings. With the master cylinder kit, Wilwood provides 2 fittings, a standard 3/16 inverted flare, or male AN#3.

    Hope this helps others with some ideas. Regards...Junior
    Last edited by junior; 08-23-2011, 09:26 AM.
    sigpic
    1954 C5 Hamilton car.

  • #2
    Very nice work.

    What we CASOs sometimes do is just bolt on a second Studebaker brake master cylinder and adapt the clutch pedal linkage to mate up with that.

    jack vines
    PackardV8

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    • #3
      I remember an old HOT ROD magazine artical on using the Stude master cylinders in parallel, it looked simple enough to fabricate.

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      • #4
        Regarding the parallel and siamesed master cylinders, I contemplated those. Mounting them siamesed was out of the question as I no longer use a stock Studebaker master cylinder, so there was no way I could mount a second one against the first one. Mounting them in parallel as in the clutch m/c on the opposite side of the frame rail from the brake m/c would have worked, however I chose not to go that route because I really wanted to use the Wilwood, or something like a Tilton because I had the option of easily switching bore sizes if I did not do my homework correctly. Luckily, my calculations were correct, so no changing of bore size was required. I also like the remote mounted reservoir, so easy to check and see if I’m losing brake fluid or not. Last time I bought a Stude m/c I paid $107, that was in 2007, this year I paid $92 for the complete Wilwood kit and that price includes the taxes and $13 (IIRC) over-night shipping charge I paid to my local speed shop. I realize that very few folks want to put a T5 transmission behind their SBC using a goofy 3rd generation Camaro bell housing in an old C/K Stude retaining the under-the-floor pedal system…the purpose for sharing with the forum was to share the information of what worked for me…especially the information about the Russell adapter. This information will benefit most members who are using a newer style of hydraulic clutch doing a 5 or 6 speed trans-swap with newer OEM type of hydraulic fittings. I found this info searching the net as many Camaro and Corvette owners are running into problems finding more heat resistant hose set-ups than the stock plastic tubing. Seems the stock stuff does not like to snuggle up with headers (no kidding!) and GM only wanted to sell them a new hose if was attached to a new master cylinder and slave cylinder! In other words, buy the complete assembly…crazy. Regards, Junior
        sigpic
        1954 C5 Hamilton car.

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        • #5
          Don't feel you have to defend the build. Your car, your money, your decison. The quality and engineering speaks for itself. And yes, the convenience of the remote reservoirs alone is enough to justify the change.

          Last time I bought a Stude m/c I paid $107, that was in 2007,
          Lest CASOs panic, last winter, from NAPA, I paid $35 each for two new Stude master cylinders that I used on my custom C-cab build. It was less expensive than having the old cylinders sleeved.

          jack vines
          PackardV8

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          • #6
            I have used the dual master for a clutch master but swapped back to mechanical. I see that you ave just provided a new option for Studebaker builders and there is nothing wrong with that. It's all good if it moves the craft forward. Thanks for the info.

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            • #7
              Jack, was not really intending to defend my build, but rather explain why I chose to go the route I did, hoping to give other members food for thought. And thanks for the comments on the nice work and engineering I did. I am learning that I really enjoy the process of solving problems on my car just about as much as I like driving. My car should really be ripped down to the frame and gone through completely, but I know I don't really have the time, & $ to do that. I do try to make an effort though to do the best work I can when adding or modifying something within the context of my abilities, tools at hand, and $ in my pocket. To my surprise, I've had a couple of pm's requesting more info on what I did, so I am pleased to contribute to the forum that has helped me so much. Regards, Junior.
              sigpic
              1954 C5 Hamilton car.

              Comment


              • #8
                Hi Junior
                From your comments I asume your car is back on the road and awaiting a road trip. Does your aunt still live in Westbank?
                I know you posted pictures and info on your Master Brake Cylinder swap with the remote reservoir. What was that again and how do you like it. I also seem to recall you have the Turner Brake conversion???
                Might be nice to repost that info here.
                Good Roads
                Brian
                Brian Woods
                woodysrods@shaw.ca
                1946 M Series (Shop Truck)

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                • #9
                  Brian I will PM you, and read your Shaw mail too. junior
                  sigpic
                  1954 C5 Hamilton car.

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