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Trouble with putting the window back in

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  • Trouble with putting the window back in

    Quick question for the group. The guy trying to restall the front windshield on my '56 Hawk says the new rubber is either too thick or too loose or the window is slightly off center. He is not a Studebaker guy but has done hotrods. Currently the windshield with the rubber on it, is seated on the passenger side and all the way to the drivers side. But the glass and rubber seal along the driver's post are about one inch forward and will not seat. He tells me that with about 100 screwdriver's in place, he can "pop" the windshield and the rubber gasket back out and start over. This whole thing has got me worried as the first original windshield shattered when he removed it. The one he is trying to put in is a used original. The rubber gasket is the repro from the SI entire car set that they sell.

    Thanks for any help.

  • #2
    I just this weekend did my 52 windshield using SI repro. It worked OK. I do think the rubber was a bit loose, they could lose a few inches fom the perimeter IMHO.
    I am sure 56 would be different - the reveal molding goes in first not later.

    Has the car been damaged to any point that the windshield opening is no longer per factory?



    Dan
    52 hardtop
    www.studebakerhardtop.com

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    • #3
      Never had a problem with the front seal if you do it with a cord as suggested in the shop manual.

      JDP/Maryland


      63 GT R2
      63 Avanti R1
      63 Daytona convert
      63 Lark 2 door
      62 Lark 2 door
      60 Lark HT-60Hawk
      59 3E truck
      58 Starlight
      52 & 53 Starliner
      51 Commander

      JDP Maryland

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      • #4
        IMHO, the guy should not be using screwdrivers on glass install or removal. Get someone that knows how to install older car glass. Use twine/rope.

        Gary L.
        Wappinger, NY

        1959 DeLuxe pickup (restomod)
        Gary L.
        Wappinger, NY

        SDC member since 1968
        Studebaker enthusiast much longer

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        • #5
          i just had a windsheild installed by a local installer / glass shop originally his sons came to my house to insall a used windsheild in my 53 coupe they could not get it in with chrome on drivers side the shop owner came the next week he was used to installing old car glass they had to work in in starting with top and pushing up to get glass in deeply into gasket then working it down into lower channel in rubber gasket he told me that some repro gaskets are not as exact as originals an d sometimes need a little pershausion. it cost me $120 for him and a assistant to do it but ididn't have go thru pain of not being able to install myself - alf

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          • #6
            I'd set it in the bottom first, use rope/twine/wire/cord like JDP suggested, the only prying that should be done is *carefully* with a putty knife to help the gasket over the lip in problem areas, the cord should be doing the bulk of the work. After it is all in, have a helper stand on the opposite side and both of you push down evenly on the WS toward the inside of the car, this should set it in place nicely. I don't recall if I've ever used a SI repro gasket or not, not sure if there are any issues there. It helps to lube the gasket with soapy water, and have the gasket warm before you do it (leave it sit in the sun for an hour or so before starting)

            good luck

            nate

            --
            55 Commander Starlight
            http://members.cox.net/njnagel
            --
            55 Commander Starlight
            http://members.cox.net/njnagel

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            • #7
              Is this guy trying to install the windshield from the outside when it should be put in from the inside out?


              HOME of THE FRIED GREEN TOMATO

              1950 2R5
              1960 Lark 2dr
              1960 Champ
              1964 Daytona HT
              sigpic

              Home of the Fried Green Tomato

              "IF YOU WANT THE SMILES YOU NEED TO DO THE MILES "

              1960 Champ , 1966 Daytona , 1965 Daytona Wagonaire

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              • #8
                Hey FGT,
                Weather is installed from outside only. I've used repro rubber that is just slightly over sized. I've been told molds are made from NOS pieces, so that would make them a little fat.
                As others have suggested, rope should absolutely be used with a minimum of slapping and banging.
                Kim

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                • #9
                  quote:Originally posted by kamzack

                  Hey FGT,
                  Weather is installed from outside only. I've used repro rubber that is just slightly over sized. I've been told molds are made from NOS pieces, so that would make them a little fat.
                  As others have suggested, rope should absolutely be used with a minimum of slapping and banging.
                  Kim
                  Did Studebaker make a big change in 1956? All the glass in a 51 goes in from the inside. And it took three of us roping it in but it will go!
                  Don

                  Don Colliau

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                  • #10
                    NO, all '47 to '52 bodies are alike and 1953 to 1964 C & K bodies are alike, and get installed from the outside! 1953 to 1966 sedan body windshields also go in from the outside.

                    I don't know about the '47-'52, but it seems they also could go in from outside a lot easier! [^]

                    StudeRich
                    Studebakers Northwest
                    Ferndale, WA
                    StudeRich
                    Second Generation Stude Driver,
                    Proud '54 Starliner Owner

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                    • #11
                      I watched the windshield install seminar at last year's national at Omaha. He did it from the inside with two guys holding-pushing the windshield from the outside in. He was inside with a sort of hook tool with a rounded point. The rubber had a bead of sealer laid into the groove before they started, then dish detergent was used as a lubricant. He sat on the front seat and used the hooked tool to work his way around the gasket a few inches at a time on each side. He had the chrome trim (except for the corner trim) on the gasket before he started. After he had everything prepped, it took about 20 minutes to finish the insert of the glass. Probably would have been less if he hadn't been explaining everything as he went along. After the glass was in, it took about another ten minutes or so to install the corners. I've never done it, and I don't know where you get the special tool he used. He made it look easy - no trimming of the gasket, and no cord.

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                      • #12
                        Okay, I've never installed a windshield and don't ever plan to, but could someone explain this "cord" thing? I'm having problems visualizing that.

                        ________________________
                        Mark Anderson
                        1965 Cruiser
                        http://home.alltel.net/anderm

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                        • #13
                          "Okay, I've never installed a windshield and don't ever plan to, but could someone explain this "cord" thing? I'm having problems visualizing that."

                          Me, too. I'm assuming a cord is just small enough to wedge under the rubber and provides enough friction that when you pull on it, the glass and rubber come with. Then you just cut off the excess when everything is in place. Close? How big a cord though?

                          Cabrina Dieters
                          Murfreesboro, TN
                          1950 Starlight Coupe

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                          • #14
                            My grandson and I recently installed front and rear windshields in his picup. We used masonry line. The rubber was purchased from Stephen Allen. It was a breeze! The reason we used the masonry string? We are bricklayers and it was handy. NT


                            Neil Thornton
                            Hazlehurst, GA
                            '57 Silver Hawk
                            '56 Sky Hawk
                            '51 2R16 dump truck
                            Many others.

                            Neil Thornton

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                            • #15
                              I use a 3/16 cord, the cord pulls the lip in as the window follows, more consistant than the hook , The main ingrediant is lubrication, keep all surfaces well lubed, I use foam spray glass cleaner , cleans up easily and leaves no residue behind.

                              http://i162.photobucket

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