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  • Body / Glass: Truck Quarter Panel Attachment

    Want to get started on fixing the damage to the rear of my truck; I got two new panels from Classic Enterprises and found an old fender that is in fair shape. I have started removing the forward, lower panel, which is spot welded to two inner splash guards; but I am not sure how it is attached at the top. There are two right angle flanges where the panels meet. It's not wanting to come loose so its either welded or just rusted together.
    Hopefully someone here has worked on these panels before and can enlighten me.

    Thanks,

    Joe D.

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  • #2
    I would straighten the existing panel from what I can see in your photos. Do you have any prior body experience? That area is double paneled but may be accessable with the proper tools, dolly, oxy/act. torch, ect. Removing what you have there might create more damage than what is existing.
    59 Lark wagon, now V-8, H.D. auto!
    60 Lark convertible V-8 auto
    61 Champ 1/2 ton 4 speed
    62 Champ 3/4 ton 5 speed o/drive
    62 Champ 3/4 ton auto
    62 Daytona convertible V-8 4 speed & 62 Cruiser, auto.
    63 G.T. Hawk R-2,4 speed
    63 Avanti (2) R-1 auto
    64 Zip Van
    66 Daytona Sport Sedan(327)V-8 4 speed
    66 Cruiser V-8 auto

    Comment


    • #3
      I agree with Warren. That panel don't look bad enough to replace (unless there is more damage than the pic shows.). Most of the damage looks like it will be covered by the fender anyway. From what I am seeing, I would work the existing panel so that the fender would fit properly, and concentrate my cosmetic efforts on the exposed portion of the panel. Once you get the metal reasonably smooth, I would coat the panel with a good epoxy primer. Then use body filler where needed (no more than 3/16ths of an inch thick). If needed, follow that with a very light coat of epoxy primer and then, if required, a "high build" sandable primer and finish coat.

      You have enough work on the back panel of the truck already. Replacing the front panel looks to be more work than fixing the existing one.

      Regardless of how you do it...good luck, and share the results.
      John Clary
      Greer, SC

      SDC member since 1975

      Comment


      • #4
        Appreciate the good advice. The panel flanges are in fact spot welded together; strange, wonder why that joint is there at all. Anyway, the panel in in worse shape than it appears. It has oil canned, so I think its pretty much beyond my skill level; The spot welds are problematic....I can cut them out but then I'm not sure how to keep the joint aligned once the a new panel is fitted in. I have a mig welder so I can spot weld the area covered by the fender, and maybe one at the forward edge. Kinda of mulling it over. ...the new panel cost $35. Could turn it over to a pro, but I see big $$$$'s which I don't have at the moment..

        Joe D.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by valleyguy View Post
          Appreciate the good advice. The panel flanges are in fact spot welded together; strange, wonder why that joint is there at all. Anyway, the panel in in worse shape than it appears. It has oil canned, so I think its pretty much beyond my skill level; The spot welds are problematic....I can cut them out but then I'm not sure how to keep the joint aligned once the a new panel is fitted in. I have a mig welder so I can spot weld the area covered by the fender, and maybe one at the forward edge. Kinda of mulling it over. ...the new panel cost $35. Could turn it over to a pro, but I see big $$$$'s which I don't have at the moment..

          Joe D.
          Joe

          I'll make a stab if you are just talking about the lower panel that has all the holes.

          I'd remove the box and flip it over on it's top. I'd then cut away the bad panel just below the joint. You can then grind the remainder of the panel away from the flange, leaving a clean, weldable surface. Take the new panels, drill 1/4" holes in the flanges, clamp them to the panels on the box and weld it together by plug welding the holes you drilled. Do every third or fourth and you should have a warp free repair. If you need to do other welds, do them near bent edges to minimize warping.

          You can do it, just take your time and post a shot or two if you have questions.

          Bob

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          • #6
            If its oil canned one could shrink using an oxy/act torch or a spot weld nail gun such as one from Harbor Freight. Grind the area with a 40 or 60 grit disc clean, then shrink the high spots & tap them down with a dolly & finish hammer. Soak with a wet rag or a blast of compressed air, feel the area for the next high spot & repeat. This would shrink the metal & eliminate the oil can while restoring the surface to a flat the way it was. Can you get your hand in behind enough to hold a dolly? My father taught me how to shrink metal as I helped him doing side jobs when I was 7. He taught me how to use the torch, adjust it to the proper flame & when to quench the spot with the wet rag. He would point to the spot he wanted heated & then tell me when to pull back so he could hammer it smooth. It was a great education & good father & son bonding.
            59 Lark wagon, now V-8, H.D. auto!
            60 Lark convertible V-8 auto
            61 Champ 1/2 ton 4 speed
            62 Champ 3/4 ton 5 speed o/drive
            62 Champ 3/4 ton auto
            62 Daytona convertible V-8 4 speed & 62 Cruiser, auto.
            63 G.T. Hawk R-2,4 speed
            63 Avanti (2) R-1 auto
            64 Zip Van
            66 Daytona Sport Sedan(327)V-8 4 speed
            66 Cruiser V-8 auto

            Comment


            • #7
              Bob, I like your method except there's no way for me to "flip the box over"; wish I could that would solve my problem; and yes I'm talking about the small foward panel with the holes (the small holes are where I drilled out the spot welds), with the idea of removing the panel; maybe a bad move.... Warren yes there plenty of room behind the panel to work the dolly; I also realize the shrinking part is not all that easy; its an art. Plus, I don't have either of the two types of welders you mentioned. I think this is what I will do: I'm going to srart working on the long top panel to try to get into reasonable straight shape; then I'll install the rear, shorter panel; that will give me an idea of how the joint is going to look. Then I'll have a beer and think about the bigger, forward panel (fix or remove). The pics below show the messed up top panel and the rear panel that I got from Classic Enterprises. Thank you for your advice and encouragement.

              Joe D.


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              • #8
                Joe

                I see the problem with the upper panel now and you are probably just better off shrinking what's there and replacing the missing panel.

                One thought, we have a great resource on the forum that does spectacular work. Why don't you PM "Da Tinman", forum name, with those shots and ask for a quick thought on how he would dolly/shrink them out. Harbor Freight has a nice set of forged body tools for under $50 and you could save everything. I'd tell you how I'd do it but Jay can give you the correct way that should take minimum time and filler.

                Bob

                Comment


                • #9
                  Well I decided to remove that lower forward panel; decided it was easier for me o replace than fix what was there; still
                  pondering how to attach the upper edge. The photos shows the panel removed and a shot of that upper flange where it was
                  joined; doesn't look like spot welds to me.. ?? removing the remainder of the flange slowly, with a dremel.

                  Joe D.

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                  • #10
                    Joe, You're way ahead just replacing that panel. You would have had hours of time trying to straighten that. Those are spot welds along that top flange. My panels were jammed on my 2E12 and I didn't mess around; those panels are cheap enough. I would unbolt the four bed bolts and stand it on end on some 2x4s to weld; it is tough to get at the upper flange to weld. The upper stamped bed rail is some rugged so don't sweat it.
                    Bish
                    sigpic"Somewhere West of Newport Center"
                    1956 2E12 O/D SOLD!
                    1959 4E2 4spd, TT
                    1963 8E28 GSA order
                    1963 8E5 SOLD!
                    1963 Lark Daytona Wagonaire 289,O/D, TT

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Joe,those are spotwelds on upper flange.check with a local bodyshop and autobody supply house in your area and ask about a 2 part bonding material.you could glue the two side panels on and not worry about burning any metal.
                      Originally posted by valleyguy View Post
                      Well I decided to remove that lower forward panel; decided it was easier for me o replace than fix what was there; still
                      pondering how to attach the upper edge. The photos shows the panel removed and a shot of that upper flange where it was
                      joined; doesn't look like spot welds to me.. ?? removing the remainder of the flange slowly, with a dremel.

                      Joe D.

                      [ATTACH=CONFIG]10405[/ATTACH] [ATTACH=CONFIG]10406[/ATTACH]
                      Joseph R. Zeiger

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                      • #12
                        just make sure you treat that rust before reassembly
                        Kevin Phillips
                        Jacksonville,AR

                        53 commander

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                        • #13
                          Well I think the new C.I. panels will work well. I'm not taking off the bed to get access to that upper joint, not enough room, not enough help; I'll attach that upper edge with stainless sheet metal screws since I can (barely) reach in there, after pre drilling everything. On to welding tomorrow. Here's a couple of pics of the the two panels temporarily in place.

                          Joe D.

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                          • #14
                            The panels are in and primed, that long top panel was really wavy from the damage, but I beat it into reasonable shape, not perfect, but I don't want to use thick layers of filler. Think I should put some seam sealer in those joints? Now I'll work on the fender.....

                            Joe D.

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                            • #15
                              Looking great, Joe. One of the fun thing about restoring trucks is that they don't have to be perfect. Heck, few of them came perfect. They were looked at as consumable tools and certainly not collectables. Back in the day, I have seen trucks that were bought new, driven by the farm supply on the way home, scratched up loading equipment, feed, etc. and ended up with a bed full of scratches and dings before dark.

                              Do the best you can, be proud of it, show it off and most of all...enjoy it.
                              John Clary
                              Greer, SC

                              SDC member since 1975

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