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How do you remove this drum?

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  • Brakes: How do you remove this drum?

    2R6 1/2 ton truck I just got recently; the po had an accident with the rear wheel
    breaking apart and messed up everything inside I'm told; he has the brake line
    capped off to this wheel; I need to get it removed to see what needs to be done.
    Does this take the puller often talked about on this forum, or is there another
    method with this particular truck; I was also told that the truck had the bigger
    brakes from a zip van. Any help appreciated.

    Joe D.

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  • #2
    A three point puller would be your best friend. There are other methods and many previous threads on this. I like the suggestion of backing the axel nut off and driving it around the yard until something "gives". You'll get lots of help from the forum contributors. Good luck.
    Dave Warren (Perry Mason by day, Perry Como by night)

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    • #3
      Originally posted by warrlaw1 View Post
      A three point puller would be your best friend. There are other methods and many previous threads on this. I like the suggestion of backing the axel nut off and driving it around the yard until something "gives". You'll get lots of help from the forum contributors. Good luck.

      I agree. Looks like any other tapered setup. Put the axle nut back on, flush with the axle, (I have a thick metal wafer that I use between the puller lead screw and axle). Be sure to align the lead screw on the puller to give a straight even pull and crank her down. As you apply pressure, an occasional whack on the end of the lead screw will often lead to a "PoP" as the hub releases. Some have had success leaving it overnight on difficult to release hubs.

      Anyone who has one of these vehicles, should own a puller. It gives you much more control over how the work is done, even if you hire someone else to do the work.
      John Clary
      Greer, SC

      SDC member since 1975

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      • #4
        Well I used the puller and it came right off, obvously because it was removed recently by the po; this is what I found. Looks like I will be searching for parts; I should have my manual in the mail any day so I can see what I need. The po did give me an extra set of shoes and a backing plate, although the latter is all rusted up. The drum surface looks ok. I am concerned with that one piece chopped off (don't know what it is called), where I marked it with chalk. It need replaced. Maybe I can salvage that part from the extra backing plate....

        Joe D.

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        • #5
          I don't see anything chopped off. I see two different styles of adjustment cam; one is a sort of a spiral, the other an eccentric circle.

          Check the axle shaft end play while you have it exposed. The spec calls for .006" or less (measured with a dial indicator). If you can move the axle in and out with an audible "clunk", chances are it has too much end play. End play is normally set by shims on the right axle only, but you really should pop the right side drum off, too, and ensure that the right side brake is intact. And, if you get new or relined shoes, they should be replaced in axle sets, anyway.
          Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands

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          • #6
            I agree with Gord, UNLESS you're indicating that the the pivot pin for the trailing brake shoe is sheared off? (Its hard to tell from the photo) I haven't worked with Stude trucks, but this looks just like the brake setup on my Champion. You have two different styles of eccentrics because it was probably originally equipped with the "special" (by that I mean quirky) Studebaker wedge/spring/plunger self adjusters. If your brake shoes and linings have a 3/4" hole in the middle, thats the style that I'm talking about. I will spare you the description of how they work but, if you don't have all or most of the parts for the adjusters, I will suggest that they aren't worth replacing, IMHO, for occasional use. You would need to weld a small steel wedge onto the inside back of the leading shoe's web, where it would contact the rounded eccentric, to give the proper range of adjustment. Then you just need to jack up the truck once a year or so to adjust the brakes. I think I have pictures of how I adapted mine, if you're interested.
            If you want a better system, it may be possible for you to swap the backing plates for 1954 or later car or small truck backing plates. They will have star wheel adjusters and larger drums. I'm told that swap works on cars, but I'm not absolutely sure if it will work on trucks as well.
            Last edited by Lothar; 07-28-2011, 12:30 PM. Reason: I had another thought. They don't come as quick as they used to.
            John
            1950 Champion
            W-3 4 Dr. Sedan
            Holdrege NE

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            • #7
              Gord/Lothar thats correct, that pin was sheared off in the accident. The other rusty backing plate provided by the PO does have a good pin but its totally rusted on there; I have been trying to get it removed by soaking etc. I can see that getting all those little parts for the antiquated self adjusters is going to be a pain...... The later backing plates/drums could be a solution, assuming I could find them...
              Don't see why they wouldn't work, if the emergency brake hook-up is similar. I need to get this fixed, Virginia requires
              a state inspection sticker and obviously, I can't get the truck inspected missing one brake. Lothar, shoot me some pics of how you
              adapted yours, I'm exploring all possibilites. Any and all ideas certainly welcomed.
              Joe D.

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              • #8
                The parts manuals are loaded with pictures that pretty much explain everything. Parts manuals are much more useful than the shop manual, in my experience.
                RadioRoy, specializing in AM/FM conversions with auxiliary inputs for iPod/satellite/CD player. In the old car radio business since 1985.


                10G-C1 - 51 Champion starlight coupe
                4H-K5 - 53 Commander starliner hardtop
                5H-D5 - 54 Commander Conestoga wagon

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