Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

1950 2R10 Worn Kingpins and Worn Spindle under Outer Bearing Inner Race

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Steering: 1950 2R10 Worn Kingpins and Worn Spindle under Outer Bearing Inner Race

    1st Subject, Worn Spindle:

    Is there any reasonable way to restore the worn spindle on my right side steering knuckle (inner race of outer bearing has spun in the past, wearing the spindle so my new bearing is a really loose fit)? I want to do this before rebuilding the kingpins.

    Reinstalling the bearing with LocTite under the inner race doesn't appeal, as to remove the drum in the future would require heating the spindle up to 400F or so to soften the LocTite enough to pull the bearing and drum assembly off.

    2nd Subject, Rebuild Kingpins Both Sides:

    The first option is to obtain a good used right side steering knuckle, and then install kingpin rebuild kits on both sides. SI has these. Hopefully I can find a good used knuckle locally (I live in Tacoma WA, near Seattle). If not, SI may have NOS knuckles.

    The second option is to obtain an entire good used front axle (drums and backing plates not needed). Weight and size make freight expensive, so the axle would have to be located close enough to Tacoma for me to pick up. Ideally, the kingpins would be ok as-is and not need rebuilding.

    My understanding is that steering knuckles and axles for any half-ton or 3/4 ton truck from 1949 up through mid-4E will fit my truck.

    Parts Sources, Advice, and Commentary Wanted:

    Any of the above will be much appreciated. Best, Phil B.
    Last edited by philbirkeland; 07-09-2011, 09:13 AM. Reason: correct typo

  • #2
    My thought would be to replace it as you suggest. However, if you have some good machine shops in your area that have precision welding skills such as repairing high-speed steel milling cutters, metal-cutting broaches, and machine shafts, it is possible that someone could build up the spindle by laying in weld beads, then chuck it in a lathe and turn it back to specs. For this, you would need a good friend willing to do a "government job" (humble euphemism for a freebie) or you'll pay through the nose for this as well. Good luck and let us know how you solve this. As our vehicles age, you will not be the only one facing this problem going forward.
    John Clary
    Greer, SC

    SDC member since 1975

    Comment

    Working...
    X