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How do I convert it to a full flow oil filter

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  • jlmccuan
    replied
    Don't despair. Yes, you can make your engine full flow filtering. Phil Harris does them, and the directions for your machine shop to do it are here. http://studebaker-info.org/Fulflo/fullflo.html

    Some folks prefer the pre- full flow blocks as described above, then make the mods to full flow.

    BTW, kick around some on Bob Johnstone's site. Most of the good tech stuff is archived there.

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  • DEEPNHOCK
    replied
    That is a misleading phrase...
    "all the oil goes through the bypass filter in less than five minutes"
    What is really being said there is...
    "All the oil volume that is in the engine goes through the bypass filter in five minutes"
    Or... If you have 5 quarts of oil in the engine, about that much volume goes through the bypass filter in five minutes.
    Nowhere does it say that all the oil gets filtered in five minutes.
    Eventually maybe, but it reminds me of an infinite number monkeys eventually one will be writing Shakespear...
    (or something like that)
    That is why the auto industry went to the 'full flow' design in the late 1950's, when a certain oil filter manufacturer patented the internal bypass chack valve in a spin on filter that allowed a true 'full flow' oiling system.
    The Studebaker setup was a low cost compromise to upgrade the old Stude block to full flow standards without re-tooling the block casting.
    Not too shabby for a low budget operation..
    Jeff

    Originally posted by PackardV8 View Post
    Just do a search for "bypass oil filter systems" and you'll come up with 925,000 hits and more than you can read in the rest of your life.
    I can quote three experts from the search above who say all the oil goes through the bypass filter in less than five minutes. Just ask anyone who hasn't gotten his filter gasket on properly how long it took to empty the crankcase! Your results may vary.

    jack vines

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  • PackardV8
    replied
    Just do a search for "bypass oil filter systems" and you'll come up with 925,000 hits and more than you can read in the rest of your life.
    And for the part we don't agree on..is the fact that in my testing past, it would take about three (maybe more) "normal" oil changes worth of driving for "all" of one...crankcase worth of oil to be run thru the filter..."one" time.
    I can quote three experts from the search above who say all the oil goes through the bypass filter in less than five minutes. Just ask anyone who hasn't gotten his filter gasket on properly how long it took to empty the crankcase! Your results may vary.

    jack vines

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  • Tom Bredehoft
    replied
    But, Mike, if you start with 6 qts of clean oil, get two particles of contaminant in the oil, the first one gets stuck in the filter long before the third one gets in the oil, so there's only one particle flowing around. It will probably settle out in the valley, making sludge so you've got 6 qts of clean oil again.

    It seems you're saying not having a filter is better than a partial flow filter. somehow I don't think this is your intent.

    Sure a full flow is better than a partial flow, but for the average daily driver with a (forinstance) '61 259, putting on a partial flow system is more reasonable than finding and installing a full flow engine.

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  • Mike Van Veghten
    replied
    But...it's big, heavy, ugly and in the way...

    And for the part we don't agree on..is the fact that in my testing past, it would take about three (maybe more) "normal" oil changes worth of driving for "all" of one...crankcase worth of oil to be run thru the filter..."one" time.
    The infinitesimal amount of oil actually filtered thru that type filter with factory type fittings and the .040"/.060" diameter in the filter continues to mix with the unfiltered oil and therefore, the actual amount of oil filtered in say....maybe 2 constant hours of driving is maybe 25%/30%.
    The bad part...is that in continued driving, this mix gets less and less of a percent cleaned because of the volume difference of contaminated vs. clean(ed) oil.
    There's never a real amount of cleaned oil to offset the amount dirty oil.
    Most full flow systems have a ..38" to ..437" hole to transfer cleaned oil back to the pan.
    And Frams HP6 has a ..625" (or .687") diameter hole as I recall...
    Compare that to .060" diameter.

    Kinda like (not exactly the same but simillar) filling a pitcher full of Moonshine...
    The take a drink...NOT GOOD...!
    Pour out 50%, refill with water (coke..what ever), give it a try...still not good.
    Do this again...and again...and again...and, well you get the idea.
    It'll take about 15 watering downs...to even make the stiff sorta..drinkable without flames comming from your throat.

    Liken this to 5 quarts of oil vs. one quart of clean, and a .060" bleed hole to help keep the pressure up (rather than act like a massive leak!).

    Hey Jack.....

    Mike
    Last edited by Mike Van Veghten; 06-20-2011, 09:02 AM.

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  • PackardV8
    replied
    While Jack and I agree on most all things Studebaker, this isn't one of them.
    Actually, Mike and I do agree on this. we're just saying the same thing in different ways. An oil filter is only necessary if something goes radically wrong via mischief or lack of maintenance. If the engine is internally clean and maintained per the Shop Manual, a full flow oil filter is not absolutely necessary, indeed no filter at all is required if there is nothing nasty to filter out.
    what I did, removed it altogether and change the oil every 2500/3500 miles...
    JMHO, but on a street-driven engine I'll always run the bypass filter rather than none at all. On that, we won't agree.

    FWIW, if I were building a pure race Studebaker V8, I'd choose an early block for its' thicker cylinder walls in preference to a later block with the full flow filter and thinner walls.

    jack vines

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  • Mike Van Veghten
    replied
    While Jack and I agree on most all things Studebaker, this isn't one of them.
    I won't go into it again, but short of a full flow block, your stuck with using the "piddle" filter or none at all.

    I'd say either find a location on the block that you can tap into larger than the 1/8" line and even smaller fitting hole dia., stock locations and use a non stock setup, use the stock type setup in it's "in the way" location...or what I did, removed it altogether and change the oil every 2500/3500 miles...
    I use Castrol GTX and the Lucas Oil Additive and haven't had any oil related problems. It's my daily driver and since I've owned the car (59, 259 Lark 2dr. wagon), the odometer is on its second trip around.

    Mike

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  • BobPalma
    replied
    What Jack said. There are hundreds of things to do to your car before worrying about the difference between a full-flow and partial-flow oil filter. BP

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  • PackardV8
    replied
    It's your engine and your decision, but do some research before you spend a lot of time and money worrying about something which is not a problem. The by-pass filter system works much better than the undeserved bad rep would lead a new owner to believe.

    FWIW, I've worked on Studebakers for fifty years and have never seen engine damage caused by a by-pass filter. if your engine is internally clean to begin with, if you change the oil and filter according to schedule, if you keep the air filter, breather cap and road draft tube clean, the by-pass filter will never be the cause of an engine problem.

    jack vines

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  • Drifter22
    started a topic Engine: How do I convert it to a full flow oil filter

    How do I convert it to a full flow oil filter

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