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  • Brakes: Brake line flaring tools, recommendations?

    I'm about to replace all the brake lines on my Cruiser as part of my 'Turnerizing' of the brake system. Bought a 25' roll of steel line, just to change my mind and decide the Copper/Nickel stuff is what I want on the car.

    What to do with the steel line? Practice my flares, of course!
    Problem is I kept making off-center flares!

    I looked at my flaring tool and found the pin on the adapter is bent. It's a cheap one, bought from Auto Zone. OEM brand, I think.

    Can anyone recommend a better one that won't cost more then the Turner kits I'm installing?
    Thanks!

  • #2
    I recently purchased a nice double flare tool from eastwood,com. It works great and is almost hard to make a poor flare. It is expensive. List in their lastest catalog at @249.99. They had a sale recently and I got i for $180 with free shipping.

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    • #3
      take it back

      Originally posted by mausersmth View Post
      I'm about to replace all the brake lines on my Cruiser as part of my 'Turnerizing' of the brake system. Bought a 25' roll of steel line, just to change my mind and decide the Copper/Nickel stuff is what I want on the car.

      What to do with the steel line? Practice my flares, of course!
      Problem is I kept making off-center flares!

      I looked at my flaring tool and found the pin on the adapter is bent. It's a cheap one, bought from Auto Zone. OEM brand, I think.

      Can anyone recommend a better one that won't cost more then the Turner kits I'm installing?
      Thanks!
      go to harbor freight and get a different packaged one. What is the problem with steel brake line? I got'sta kinow. jimmijim
      sigpicAnything worth doing deserves your best shot. Do it right the first time. When you're done you will know it. { I'm just the guy who thinks he knows everything, my buddy is the guy who knows everything.} cheers jimmijim*****SDC***** member

      Comment


      • #4
        If you have a good old school NAPA parts store in your area, go to them and see what they are selling the garages in your area. See if they have a good old name brand such as Imperial Eastman or Milton. There are others that work just fine. Shouldn't cost an arm and a leg either. Make sure you get the double flaring unit. A NAPA sales tech worth his salt will steer you in the right direction.
        John Clary
        Greer, SC

        SDC member since 1975

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by jimmijim8 View Post
          go to harbor freight and get a different packaged one. What is the problem with steel brake line? I got'sta kinow. jimmijim
          How long you want them to last?
          http://64.90.169.191/applications/au...rake_tube.html

          If I can do a job once and be done with it, even if my heirs sell the car after I'm a memory, and at a reasonable price, why not?
          Steel lines I'd have to replace again if I keep the car (and live as long as my dad did.)

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          • #6
            Anyone try the Craftsman (Sears) double flaring tool?

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            • #7
              I have a Craftsman one but I prefer the K-D one I bought years ago. Neither was that expensive. The smallest double flare adapter is a consumable unfortunately. It'll last longer if you use a sharp cutter, and dress the cut end of the tube with a flat file and deburring tool (inside) to make sure end is square and 100% symmetrical in every way before each flare.

              nate
              --
              55 Commander Starlight
              http://members.cox.net/njnagel

              Comment


              • #8
                just a tad

                Originally posted by mausersmth View Post
                How long you want them to last?
                http://64.90.169.191/applications/au...rake_tube.html

                If I can do a job once and be done with it, even if my heirs sell the car after I'm a memory, and at a reasonable price, why not?
                Steel lines I'd have to replace again if I keep the car (and live as long as my dad did.)
                I would expect them to last as long as my car is old as it is a 63 Hawk and has never been and as long as I own it be sublect to calcium chloride covered roads.
                sigpicAnything worth doing deserves your best shot. Do it right the first time. When you're done you will know it. { I'm just the guy who thinks he knows everything, my buddy is the guy who knows everything.} cheers jimmijim*****SDC***** member

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by N8N View Post
                  I have a Craftsman one but I prefer the K-D one I bought years ago. Neither was that expensive. The smallest double flare adapter is a consumable unfortunately. It'll last longer if you use a sharp cutter, and dress the cut end of the tube with a flat file and deburring tool (inside) to make sure end is square and 100% symmetrical in every way before each flare.

                  nate

                  Excellent point! Preperation is key. Simply cutting and crunching the ends with the tool will get inconsistant results.
                  John Clary
                  Greer, SC

                  SDC member since 1975

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by jimmijim8 View Post
                    I would expect them to last as long as my car is old as it is a 63 Hawk and has never been and as long as I own it be sublect to calcium chloride covered roads.
                    I believe the lines on my car are mostly original, and I don't plan to let the car see salty roads, but I still prefer to improve little details when I can. That's why the Turner brakes are going on all four corners, and a dual master is feeding them. That's why the points got replaced with a Pertronics.

                    Don't get me wrong, steel does the job, and with avoiding salt, might for a couple decades. Just not sure I'll want to re-do my lines again when I'm in my 70's.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      just a few decades

                      Originally posted by mausersmth View Post
                      How long you want them to last?
                      http://64.90.169.191/applications/au...rake_tube.html

                      If I can do a job once and be done with it, even if my heirs sell the car after I'm a memory, and at a reasonable price, why not?
                      Steel lines I'd have to replace again if I keep the car (and live as long as my dad did.)
                      I would expect to expect them to last at least as long as my 63 Hawk is old even if it happens to be a rust free unrestored survivor. If the steel replacement line is of equal metalurgical quality as OEM type and under non snow belt circumstances I would say it to be fine. I may consider a set of Brazilian made rubber brake lines for a project car I intend to flip. cheers jimmijim
                      Last edited by jimmijim8; 06-04-2011, 03:02 PM.
                      sigpicAnything worth doing deserves your best shot. Do it right the first time. When you're done you will know it. { I'm just the guy who thinks he knows everything, my buddy is the guy who knows everything.} cheers jimmijim*****SDC***** member

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Another reason I'm not using steel lines, I opened up the rear wheel cylinders and found extensive pitting. If the inner walls of the cylinders rust, why not the lines?

                        Here in MD it gets humid, and I might forget to flush the brake system one year. DOT 3/4 fluid absorbs moisture, even the synthetic stuff I use.
                        The steel lines might outlast me on the Cruiser, but I choose not to chance it. Besides, I'll need to replace the lines on my 'new' '81 Ford F-150 Winter Beater, and I know the steel would rust there!

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I like imperial brand tools, I've had mine for years I hope they're still made in the USA. Try this website they used to sell imperial but the description of the tools doesn't say so give them a call.
                          Read they're tips on how to flare. The key is square cuts, and preparation before flare like chamfer the outer and debur the inner...........mostly practice practice practice. I'd buy a few 3/16 double flare buttons they are easy to bend and break. If you extend the tubing too far into the fixture for the first step you will bend the flare button. I have they're 3/16 bender and its a nice one, the multi size benders are usually too big to make tight bends.
                          http://www.inlinetube.com/


                          Originally posted by mausersmth View Post
                          I'm about to replace all the brake lines on my Cruiser as part of my 'Turnerizing' of the brake system. Bought a 25' roll of steel line, just to change my mind and decide the Copper/Nickel stuff is what I want on the car.

                          What to do with the steel line? Practice my flares, of course!
                          Problem is I kept making off-center flares!

                          I looked at my flaring tool and found the pin on the adapter is bent. It's a cheap one, bought from Auto Zone. OEM brand, I think.

                          Can anyone recommend a better one that won't cost more then the Turner kits I'm installing?
                          Thanks!

                          Russ Shop Foreman \"Rusty Nut Garage\"
                          53 2R6 289 5SpdOD (driver)
                          57 SH (project)
                          60 Lark VIII 2dr sd (driver)

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            like gmax , i also got the flaring tool from Eastwood when it was on sale and it works awesome !!!! and does SS. you can go to their
                            website and watch a video.
                            good luck

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              I stopped by at an O'Reily auto parts store today & noticed they load double flare kits out. You might try them or one of their competitors. The price would be right at least!
                              59 Lark wagon, now V-8, H.D. auto!
                              60 Lark convertible V-8 auto
                              61 Champ 1/2 ton 4 speed
                              62 Champ 3/4 ton 5 speed o/drive
                              62 Champ 3/4 ton auto
                              62 Daytona convertible V-8 4 speed & 62 Cruiser, auto.
                              63 G.T. Hawk R-2,4 speed
                              63 Avanti (2) R-1 auto
                              64 Zip Van
                              66 Daytona Sport Sedan(327)V-8 4 speed
                              66 Cruiser V-8 auto

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