Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Front Toe-in

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • sals54
    replied
    As far as the runout is concerned, I don't worry too much about it. I think allowing the car to roll to a stop WITHOUT BRAKING, then not using a jack from that point on is one of the keys to success. I believe it helps to use the Ford wheels, being heavier gage steel, the larger lug nuts also help a little to keep the wheel secure, and while there is play found in all the parts and bearings, it has worked for me for decades.
    Jack, I was going to say that the toe in appears to be approximately 1 degree, but someone smarter than me, figured that out already.

    Leave a comment:


  • RHO
    replied
    Thanks very much for the information. I should be able to work this now.

    Leave a comment:


  • Dan Timberlake
    replied
    1 degree = 1 inch @ 57 inches

    For 15 inch wheels a difference of .14 at the tire treads or .08 inch at the rim is about 20 "minutes" or 1/3 degree

    Leave a comment:


  • Dan Timberlake
    replied
    If I read it right, the reference is the tire sidewall. I'd be concerned that wheel runout plus tire runout could severely influence where the string points. Steel wheels often have 1/8 inch runout, and tires are even worse.
    A test would be to roll the car forward exactly 1/2 rev of the tires (so their runout is reversed) and see if the measurement repeats.

    I like to scribe a line on the rotating tire with a sharpie marker. That defines a plane perpendicular to the axis of rotation.
    http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_b6FK-pvqmI...600/toe+2s.JPG

    Then a crude wooden caliper or similar gage can directly measure the difference between front and rear of the tires, which is the toe-in. No need to roll the car.
    This is a real fancy gauge.
    http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_b6FK-pvqmI...00/toe+10s.JPG

    Leave a comment:


  • studegary
    replied
    To add to the above -
    Make similar adjustments on each side of the car to keep the steering centered.
    When you tighten the sleeve bolts, be sure that they will not interfere with anything, like the pan.

    Leave a comment:


  • PackardV8
    replied
    Take two pieces of string, each about 15 ft long and tape each piece to the rear of the front tire, running it forward to the jack stand which is placed about 8-10 feet in front of each tire.
    The distance at the jack stands should be one inch shorter than the measure at the front tires.
    Sal, your method obviously works, but for those trigonometrically challenged, what would the the actual toe-in at the wheel with the string 1" closer together when the jack stands are 8' out? At 10' out?

    jack vines

    Leave a comment:


  • sals54
    replied
    RHO,
    I answered on a PM, but thought I would place the response here as well, just in case someone else is interested:
    I hope I can detail this for you without images. Please understand that this only works when the front end parts are in reasonably good condition. If your front control arm bushings are shot, or if the steering bell crank is severely worn, alignment won't fix the problem. But its easier to do the adjustment than it is to describe it. Here goes:
    Before you start this procedure, loosen the tie rod adjuster bolts and be sure the adjuster is loose on the tie rods. Re-tighten the bolts for safety, then proceed to position the car for your work. Drive your car into a place where it can be allowed to roll to a stop with the steering wheel in its natural position. Be sure to remove front hub caps.
    Items you'll need: two jack stands, 30 feet of string, 1/2 inch wrench, tape measure, pliers and duct tape.
    Once the car is in place, loosen the adjuster bolts again.
    Take two pieces of string, each about 15 ft long and tape each piece to the rear of the front tire, running it forward to the jack stand which is placed about 8-10 feet in front of each tire. The string should run across the centerline of the wheel, level to the ground.
    After setting this up on both wheels, from the position of the jack stands, move the jack stand side to side until the string just barely touches the front sidewall of the tire. The string should be taught, but need not be overly tight. At this point, look down the string line toward the rear of the car. You are looking to see if one wheel or the other is grossly misaligned. If so, do the major part of the adjustments on that side until both wheels are aligned.
    Now comes the measurement. Measure the distance between the strings just ahead of the front tires. Next, measure the distance between the strings at the jack stands. The distance at the jack stands should be one inch shorter than the measure at the front tires. Adjust the tie rods until this is accomplished. Be sure to reposition the jack stands after each adjustment. Measure again after moving the jack stands until the correct measurement is achieved.
    Reach back under the car and tighten the tie rod adjuster bolts.
    Drive the car again to see if the alignment worked. If not, just remeasure with the string to see if its still aligned. You may want to do the procedure one more time just in case. If it does not work again, you may have more serious issues in your front end to deal with.
    Good luck. And let us know if this works for you. Others may be in need.

    Leave a comment:


  • sals54
    replied
    RHO, Sorry that I missed your pm. I'll get a detailed reply sent to you tonight. Got a birthday party to attend just now.

    Leave a comment:


  • RHO
    replied
    Originally posted by sals54 View Post
    The toe in is the easiest of the front end alignments to do at home. I've always done my own with string and a couple of jack stands. I've never had uneven wear on my tires. But then again, its only been 35 years of driving it this way, so who knows? Send a PM and I'll explain how to do it. Its very easy.
    Sent you a PM couple days ago.

    Leave a comment:


  • Dan Timberlake
    replied
    Last year A friend's dad took his late model Grand Marquis to one of the big chains for new tires. It was one that included "free alignment" with tire purchase. They took one look at the rusty tie rods on that Massachusetts car and said they would not be able to adjust it. The dad asked if I'd look at it, and confirmed the tie rods were rusted tight. A leisurely hour with penetrating oil and vice grips got things freed up with guaranteed adjustment of several turns in both directions.

    Bob took the car back for his free alignment. When they tried to turn him away again He gleefully told them he had seen the tie rod sleeves turning freely with his own eyes just a few days before, and would not be denied until they reluctantly give it a try.

    Leave a comment:


  • Warren Webb
    replied
    Most of the alignment machines out there today are computerized & dont have the program for Studebakers. The techs that they produce are only able to follow the instructions given in the program so they have no knowledge of doing things with their own mind. They have to be told how to do anything. If things continue one day in the future there will have to be instructions on how to twist off a bottle cap. It never stops amazing me how it is becoming so previlant that the simplest things mechanical are beyond what one would think is an intelligent mind. A little less than a year ago I worked at one of those "national tire stores". A nice 56 Packard came in for an alignment, but they refused to do the job, even after I printed out all the spec's that were available online.

    Leave a comment:


  • jackb
    replied
    liability....

    Leave a comment:


  • Son O Lark
    replied
    If this condition has suddenly become apparent, then something has worn out or you have hit a huge bump. Check your rubber bushings up front.

    Leave a comment:


  • sals54
    replied
    The toe in is the easiest of the front end alignments to do at home. I've always done my own with string and a couple of jack stands. I've never had uneven wear on my tires. But then again, its only been 35 years of driving it this way, so who knows? Send a PM and I'll explain how to do it. Its very easy.

    Leave a comment:


  • Mike Van Veghten
    replied
    Front toe-in...funny..
    Kinda like tuna...fish.

    Like everyone has said.
    The actual adjustment....is "exactly" like the "preponderous of Chevies and Fords"...and even Chryslers.
    Same fasteners need to be loosened, the same adjustment needs to be made, the same way and the same fasteners need to be retightened.

    Mike

    Leave a comment:

Working...
X