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About those little traces of red paint

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  • Paint: About those little traces of red paint

    Hi folks,

    I've found several traces of red paint on my 63S-GT. So far, they are located on the plugs of the gearbox and the nuts of the knuckle rod clamps. As silly as I am, I intend to respect them and restore those that may have disappear.
    Would you know what is the rule for them?
    Are they used for servicing points, checked points during assembly or both (seems to)?

    Nice day to all.
    sigpic

  • #2
    Probably used as factory line inspection checks. I don't know what the European assembly plants procedures were , but, I have found similar markings in orange,yellow and green on South Bend cars.
    The R3 I'm restoring had green paint daubed on the power steering pump halves, a yellow mark on the pitman arm nut, and orange grease pencil numbers on the flanged axle, and pink paint on the pinion nut. Also green and white marks denoting heavy duty springs. All faithfully replicated by me as found.
    I applaud your attention to detail most restorers don't give the level of detail that deeply.
    Bez Auto Alchemy
    573-318-8948
    http://bezautoalchemy.com


    "Don't believe every internet quote" Abe Lincoln

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    • #3
      Thanks for the info and for your appreciation, Brad. That's very kind, especially from such a high-level restorer like you.
      These little things are not very time consuming, so there's no reason to avoid them. Besides, they were intended to be useful and they still are.
      Things can be worse, you know. On my 1959 DS19, most of the mechanical parts got the litttle touch of paint (yellow, mostly) AND a painted stamp depending of the person who controlled it. When, it is still there, I have to save it when I overhaul the part, but that's a part of the job anyway.
      I've always thought that a good restorer is both a mechanic and an archeologist.

      I wish you a nice afternoon.
      sigpic

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      • #4
        I have an easy trick for you on the factory stamp with a name...etc. take a picture of it and go to a office supply store (or on the web) and have a rubber stamp made up to match. Then dip it in thinned out paint and stamp away. Have done this on Shelbys, etc.
        Bez Auto Alchemy
        573-318-8948
        http://bezautoalchemy.com


        "Don't believe every internet quote" Abe Lincoln

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        • #5
          Thanks for the trick Brad. I've already thought about that, but there are 1000 possible combinations, as there was a different controller for each type of part. I'll look if there is some sort of modifiable stamp.
          sigpic

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          • #6
            If you're the artistic sort, you could carve your own stamps. I used to do this with potatoes, believe it or not. (Not for cars, but for other artistic endeavors) Of course, it would only be good for a few applications, but talk about a cheap medium.
            '63 Lark Custom, 259 v8, auto, child seat

            "Your friendly neighborhood Studebaker evangelist"

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