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Stabilizer Bars, Sway Bars and Anti-Roll Bars. Studebaker directed but only somewhat Studebaker

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  • Don Jeffers
    replied
    Originally posted by PlainBrownR2 View Post
    they called it a "self commencer". .
    The commencer, that's a good one.

    Leave a comment:


  • johnod
    replied
    Originally posted by Don Jeffers View Post
    Not wanting to hijack the original thread, I opened a new one. Thanks to all that contributed.












    I've got to confess that, after having heard and read each of these terms used over the years, I stuck my toe in these waters to see what the responses might be. It has been interesting.

    In the Studebaker Parts and Service Manuals they are "Stabilizer Bars".

    In the world of SAE (Society of Automotive Engineers) and vehicle dynamics, they are generally termed "Anti-Roll Bars". A vehicle has three axes through the center of gravity; the longitudinal axis, the lateral axis and the vertical axis. A vehicle rolls about the longitudinal axis, yaws about the vertical axis and pitches about the lateral axis. Hence Anti-Roll Bars, those torsion bars that are attached to the suspension from side to side to oppose roll.

    Across the pond and commonly on this side as well and around the world these same devices are often called "Sway Bars".

    For years I wondered exactly what was "sway" anyway and how would you define it?

    Then I test drove a twenty-five year old GMC motorhome that had no (Stabilizer, Anti-roll, Sway, take your pick) bar as well as severly worn shocks. The drive was at 15 to 20 mph over a small country road near the coast of rural Oregon. The road was narrow, irregularly wavy, bumpy and with pot-holes.

    Each of the coach's six wheels and three axles was trying to drive the coach in one direction or another in varying degrees of pitch, roll and yaw.

    I instantly saw SWAY! Up and down and around it went like a round bottom boat over the waves. I could imagine the old cars of the teens and twenties in Europe swaying around on narrow lanes and could see that with the installation of a small "Sway Bar" and some marginally effective shocks, "Sway" could been "Anti-ed". I saw how our European counterparts came up with the sway bar and how we also had picked up on the use of the term.

    So:

    In the land of Studebaker they are "Stabilizer Bars".

    With the SAE and in vehicle dynamics texts they are usually "Anti-Roll Bars".

    In Europe as well as in the USA and much of the world, they are commonly called "Sway Bars".

    In general they are whichever you choose to call them. Just send me the right part please, when I order it.


    Regards

    If you've seen a movie with Sophia Loren walking away, you should know what sway is.

    Leave a comment:


  • PlainBrownR2
    replied
    I wouldn't worry too much about what to call them. We have a Model T, which had a starter as an option(yeah they offered a device beyond the wrist fracturing hand crank, lol). But, they didn't call it a starter in the shop manual, they called it a "self commencer". Personally I just use the term starter, it as it may not be correct in the manual, but everyone knows what it is. However in the end they all describe the same device. I usually call them sway bars, maybe stabilizer bars, but anti roll bars on a Studebaker may make me take pause a little bit since I've heard that term generally used for the Fords. In short, yeah, whatever you choose to call them, just remember you're trying to keep everyone on the same page .

    Leave a comment:


  • Stabilizer Bars, Sway Bars and Anti-Roll Bars. Studebaker directed but only somewhat Studebaker

    Not wanting to hijack the original thread, I opened a new one. Thanks to all that contributed.


    Originally posted by Studebakercenteroforegon View Post
    Another thought: We always refer to "Sway Bars" but shouldn't we think "Anti-Sway Bars?"
    Originally posted by Don Jeffers View Post
    How about "Anti-Roll Bars"?
    Originally posted by Harv View Post
    . . . Sway Bar or Traction Bar . . . big Dave Thibeault . . . at the Swap Meet in SB . . . was talking fluent "sway/traction bar" . . .
    Originally posted by PlainBrownR2 View Post
    ....and down the semantic rabbit hole we go .
    Originally posted by StudeRich View Post
    I find it interesting, that of all the names the Front and Rear STABILIZER BARS were called here, NONE were correct!
    I've got to confess that, after having heard and read each of these terms used over the years, I stuck my toe in these waters to see what the responses might be. It has been interesting.

    In the Studebaker Parts and Service Manuals they are "Stabilizer Bars".

    In the world of SAE (Society of Automotive Engineers) and vehicle dynamics, they are generally termed "Anti-Roll Bars". A vehicle has three axes through the center of gravity; the longitudinal axis, the lateral axis and the vertical axis. A vehicle rolls about the longitudinal axis, yaws about the vertical axis and pitches about the lateral axis. Hence Anti-Roll Bars, those torsion bars that are attached to the suspension from side to side to oppose roll.

    Across the pond and commonly on this side as well and around the world these same devices are often called "Sway Bars".

    For years I wondered exactly what was "sway" anyway and how would you define it?

    Then I test drove a twenty-five year old GMC motorhome that had no (Stabilizer, Anti-roll, Sway, take your pick) bar as well as severly worn shocks. The drive was at 15 to 20 mph over a small country road near the coast of rural Oregon. The road was narrow, irregularly wavy, bumpy and with pot-holes.

    Each of the coach's six wheels and three axles was trying to drive the coach in one direction or another in varying degrees of pitch, roll and yaw.

    I instantly saw SWAY! Up and down and around it went like a round bottom boat over the waves. I could imagine the old cars of the teens and twenties in Europe swaying around on narrow lanes and could see that with the installation of a small "Sway Bar" and some marginally effective shocks, "Sway" could been "Anti-ed". I saw how our European counterparts came up with the sway bar and how we also had picked up on the use of the term.

    So:

    In the land of Studebaker they are "Stabilizer Bars".

    With the SAE and in vehicle dynamics texts they are usually "Anti-Roll Bars".

    In Europe as well as in the USA and much of the world, they are commonly called "Sway Bars".

    In general they are whichever you choose to call them. Just send me the right part please, when I order it.


    Regards
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