Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Bell-housing Dowels

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Transmission / Overdrive: Bell-housing Dowels

    I am putting on a different bell-housing, 1963 V8 manual, but can't find a hand reamer for the dowel pin holes once the hole is drilled slightly under size . What have others used and how did you go about it. I have the original dowels and larger ones if needed. What location did you use and what else do I need. I have tried to dial it in with the originals in place and it's not close enough. In a pinch years ago I just drilled new holes and tapped in the dowels but I want to do it right so any assistance/advice would be appreciated. Just treat me like I know nothing and start from the beginning and I wont be offended. There is always something to learn.

    Thanks in advance.

  • #2
    Dowel pins are not expensive enough for me to do that and I already have a few different set of various sizes. The quality of a bought one as opposed to me trying to make one prohibits me from doing that. Good luck with your attempt that as I'm not game to do such a thing.

    Comment


    • #3
      I believe that this is the reamer you need (4A):http://cgi.ebay.com/Reamer-Adjustabl...-/320656575528

      The other thing you can do is line up the bell housing, put a couple of C-clamps on to hold the position, then drill some new holes through both the flanges and insert a roll pin in each new hole. I think 3/16 or 1/4 inch roll pins should be big enough. This can pin the housing so it won't ever move and you can put the bolts back in the holes. The rolls pins are left in place permanently, but you can get the bell housing off again. You may need the reamer to get even standard size bolts in if there was a lot of misalignment.
      Gary Ash
      Dartmouth, Mass.

      '32 Indy car replica (in progress)
      ’41 Commander Land Cruiser
      '48 M5
      '65 Wagonaire Commander
      '63 Wagonaire Standard
      web site at http://www.studegarage.com

      Comment


      • #4
        Gary, will these work as well as a dowel? I have heard of people using them but I did not think the roll pins were for precision work like the dowels are. Have you used this technique before and if so have you checked the bell-housing after some time for alignment?

        About the reamer, I don't know if I could get it adjusted as precisely as .0002" under for a press in dowel. It might be worth a try but I was looking for one made for the job. I have seen them for machine work but can't find one for a hand tool. I just don't have the measuring tools that are that accurate.

        Comment


        • #5
          OK, you said "Just treat me like I know nothing and start from the beginning and I wont be offended." so here is one of my posts from the old Studebakier Newsgroup, with slight rewordiing and updated links:

          I get my hardened dowel pins from the local hardware store. A lot of hardware stores have a bank of small drawers, each about 2" high x 12", that have all kinds of small do-dads like bolts, pins, dowel pins, etc. Try an 'independant-type' hardware store, or an Ace hardware. They have different diameters and lengths of dowel pins. Make sure you get the hardened kind. If they are too long, they can be cut with a cutoff wheel.

          To properly size the hole, you need to use a hand reamer. They come in different sizes, get the size that matches the dowel. Also get a drill bit that is 0.010" or so less in diameter than the dowel. You drill the hole, and then use the hand reamer to size the hole for the dowel pin. I get my reamers from KBC Tools. Make sure you get the hand reamer, which will have a square end so you can use a tap handle. Here's a link: http://www.kbctools.com/usa/Navigati...cfm?PDFPage=86

          For pictures of the reamer and process, go here:
          http://racingstudebakers.com/copperm...lbum=76&page=4
          I have two pics, one of the drill, pin, and reamer; the other is a pic of actually reaming out the drilled hole when I assembled the engine/tranny on my '63 Champ truck. Click the thumbnails to bring up the larger pic, and if you want the really big pic, click again.

          The reamer was a 3/8" spiral flute high speed hand reamer, and the drill bit was a "U" size, which is 0.3680" dia. This gave me around 0.007" or so to ream out to 3/8". The cast iron is easy to drill, but go slow and try to stay as straight as you can. (Of course, you may need a different size, depending on how many times the bellhousing and/or block has had this operation done before.) The cast iron is VERY easy to ream out.
          Paul
          Winston-Salem, NC
          Visit The Studebaker Skytop Registry website at: www.studebakerskytop.com

          Comment


          • #6
            Good info. Thanks for the links.
            "In the heart of Arkansas."
            Searcy, Arkansas
            1952 Commander 2 door. Really fine 259.
            1952 2R pickup

            Comment


            • #7
              Paul, did you use new holes or just enlarge the existing 11/32" holes? The reamers at the site are they -.0002" or .0000" for dowel pins, because some are not for dowel pins and make the actual hole .0000 to +.0002" larger. Did you get the "Hand Expansion Reamer" in the 3/8" size, or just the hand reamer?

              Comment


              • #8
                Let's keep in mind the practical specs for bell housing alignment: the max. runout should be no more than .004". However, that does allow a little tolerance on reaming the hole, especially because the dowel bolts are drawn in by tightening the nut, not by hammering them in. As Paul says, start with a drill a little undersize. You can use the adjustable hand reamer to gradually enlarge the hole until the dowel bolt body just barely starts into the hole. The threaded portion has a smaller diameter and will go in easily. The nut will pull the bolt body through, even if the hole is .0005-.001" undersize without cracking anything. Even if you got .001" or so oversize, at which point the dowel bolt should easily slide into the hole, the housing can't go too far. You just don't want to wind up with a hole .015-.020" oversize, as you would normally have with a drilled clearance hole.

                I used two roll pins in new holes that I drilled so that the non-original housing wouldn't move while I was reaming the dowel bolt holes in the alternate locations from the original ones. Once all of the bolts are in and torqued, there shouldn't be any sideways motion of the housing, so I think even a couple of good-sized roll pins will also work without the dowel bolts and not allow any motion. If there was any motion, it would immediately loosen the nuts and bolts, so nuts that remain tight, i.e. bolt is under tension, are proof of no motion.
                Gary Ash
                Dartmouth, Mass.

                '32 Indy car replica (in progress)
                ’41 Commander Land Cruiser
                '48 M5
                '65 Wagonaire Commander
                '63 Wagonaire Standard
                web site at http://www.studegarage.com

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Skybolt View Post
                  Paul, did you use new holes or just enlarge the existing 11/32" holes? The reamers at the site are they -.0002" or .0000" for dowel pins, because some are not for dowel pins and make the actual hole .0000 to +.0002" larger. Did you get the "Hand Expansion Reamer" in the 3/8" size, or just the hand reamer?
                  Normally I will use the existing holes. There might be cases where you would need to drill another hole. Also, if the block/bellhousing holes are so misaligned that 1/32" won't be enough, an even larger dowel pin would be required.

                  What I use are the hand reamers at the top of the page 86, not the adjustable 'Hand Expansion Reamer' although this would work too. When the hole is properly reamed with a non-adjustable hand reamer, the dowel pin is a VERY snug fit, just about zero tolerance. When using the hand expansion reamer, you will just have to be careful not to oversize the hole.

                  For clarification, note that in Gary's response he is referring to dowel bolts, which Studebaker used on 6 cylinder engines. Since you are working on a V8, you are working with dowel pins. Same basic procedure exceopt the dowel bolts are (in my opinion) easier to work with since as Gary notes you can pull the dowel bolt thru the hole with the nut even if the fit is a little tight.
                  Paul
                  Winston-Salem, NC
                  Visit The Studebaker Skytop Registry website at: www.studebakerskytop.com

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Thanks to all as this has clarified all my questions. And I was wondering about the dowels with bolts and nuts as I am working on an 8..I guess the skybolt handle is a little misleading at times but I chose that when I had no plans to use an 8 again.

                    Comment

                    Working...
                    X