Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

All-time dumb gas tank damage...

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16
    Originally posted by warrlaw1 View Post
    I've seen Rockne10's solution work on dented roofs and hoods. A toilet plunger works, sometimes.
    The toilet plunger comment reminds me of a story (again <G>). When I was last selling new and used cars full time, we took in a late model used car that had a large, but smooth, dent in the front fender. I went out to the clean-up man's garage and he was about to leave with the car. I asked where he was going. He said that he was taking the car to the body shop to get the dent repaired. I asked if he had a toilet plunger (he also cleaned the rest rooms). He said that he did. I said that he should clean both surfaces (fender and plunger), leave them wet and then attach the plunger and give a good, quick yank. He didn't believe me, but he did try it after I left the garage. The fender came out like new without a crease or any damage to the original paint. I turned him into a believer. I had previously done this to my Riviera where it had been hit by an ambulance.
    Gary L.
    Wappinger, NY

    SDC member since 1968
    Studebaker enthusiast much longer

    Comment


    • #17
      I was towing a trailer with my 57 Hwak when the trailer came off the ball. i had safety chains, so the trailer frotn draigged on the street. I stopped and the trailer ran into the bumper of the car. the upright refrigerator fell forward onto the trunk lid, making a big dent. Severl weeks later i was pumpoing gas on a hot day when WHUNK! the trunk fixed itself. If i hadn't been standing there i would forever been mistified. Don't know if it would work for gas tanks, tho.

      alanahasan

      Comment


      • #18
        Since the car is now on eBay, what did you do to fix the gas tank?

        jack vines
        PackardV8

        Comment


        • #19
          Originally posted by PackardV8 View Post
          Since the car is now on eBay, what did you do to fix the gas tank?

          jack vines
          I'm going to drop the tank today and will have it fixed one way or the other before a buyer (hopefully) picks it up. There's an old time radiator shop nearby who has fixed them by taking them apart, cleaning, and re-assembling. If I can't pop out the dent my self, I'll bite the bullet and get it done right. I've been procrastinating some because I don't really have a way to get rid of the stale gas. Seems like when it rains it pours. Right after I got it on eBay I had a bunch of other things come up and my wife is gone this week so I'm having to take of her do-it-before-I-get-home list.
          Paul Johnson, Wild and Wonderful West Virginia.
          '64 Daytona Wagonaire, '64 Avanti R-1, Museum R-4 engine, '72 Gravely Model 430 with Onan engine

          Comment


          • #20
            Reading back over all the suggestions, including mine, without seeing the dent, it is impossible to decide where to start. If it is a large smooth depression, then air pressure or suction might work. If it it wrinkled the sheetmetal, then I'd go with having a body shop spot-weld pins and pull them out.

            The bad news is when you start disturbing the rust inside a sixty-seven year old tank, the possibility of causing other leaks is always there. In that regard, your radiator shop might be the best place to have it.

            jack vines
            PackardV8

            Comment


            • #21
              Jack makes a good point. I had mine completely out and redone by "Gas Tank Renue" where it was coated and baked inside and out. Peace of mind for a few $.
              Dave Warren (Perry Mason by day, Perry Como by night)

              Comment


              • #22
                Originally posted by PackardV8 View Post
                Reading back over all the suggestions, including mine, without seeing the dent, it is impossible to decide where to start. If it is a large smooth depression, then air pressure or suction might work. If it it wrinkled the sheetmetal, then I'd go with having a body shop spot-weld pins and pull them out.

                The bad news is when you start disturbing the rust inside a sixty-seven year old tank, the possibility of causing other leaks is always there. In that regard, your radiator shop might be the best place to have it.

                jack vines
                You got that right. I'm not so concerned about leaks as quickly clogging the filter between the tank and the pump and having an unhappy buyer. I pulled the sender. This what things look like. The tank goes to Dickies Radiator in Winchester, VA tomorrow.
                Paul Johnson, Wild and Wonderful West Virginia.
                '64 Daytona Wagonaire, '64 Avanti R-1, Museum R-4 engine, '72 Gravely Model 430 with Onan engine

                Comment


                • #23
                  Good call. I love it when SDCers look after the potential purchaser. We are all ambassadors to some extent. Way to go.
                  Dave Warren (Perry Mason by day, Perry Como by night)

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Took the tank over to Dickie's Radiator Shop in Winchester, VA this morning. I told him when I called yesterday that it was a Studebaker tank. He looked at it, asked what year Studebaker then commented that he had a man just bring him a '51 Studebaker radiator, gave me his name and asked if I knew him (I didn't). He said he would be able to clean it, coat the inside and take out the dent. Originally quited me $80 to $90, but I suspect it come out a little more if he has to take it apart to work. Dickie re-cored the radiator from my '64 Daytona convertible a couple years ago- nice job. He complained then that he was getting to old to do that sort of stuff and he was going to quit doing them. Today he told me he was getting to old to work on gas tanks so I guess that's kind of his standard line. Was fun to see an honest to goodness old time radiator shop.
                    Paul Johnson, Wild and Wonderful West Virginia.
                    '64 Daytona Wagonaire, '64 Avanti R-1, Museum R-4 engine, '72 Gravely Model 430 with Onan engine

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Hey Paul, did Dickie say the name Foster as the guy that brought the 51 radiator in?

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        Originally posted by 31Streetrod View Post
                        Hey Paul, did Dickie say the name Foster as the guy that brought the 51 radiator in?
                        I belive he said Rubin or Roodin, something like that- didn't ring a bell with me.
                        Paul Johnson, Wild and Wonderful West Virginia.
                        '64 Daytona Wagonaire, '64 Avanti R-1, Museum R-4 engine, '72 Gravely Model 430 with Onan engine

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          I might be coming into this conversation a bit late but have a suggestion anyhow. As a student working a summer job in a barrel factory where we reconditioned steel 45 gallon drums we would would press out the dents and kinks with water pressure as air is too difficult to control. bang the edges of the dent with a rubber mallet as the water pressure is applied. Works great. I know nobody wants to put water in thier gas tank but i am sure that can be remedied after the fact.
                          Cheers

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            I bet it works fine, Corrie. And a little methyl hydrate would suck out any residual moisture.
                            Dave Warren (Perry Mason by day, Perry Como by night)

                            Comment

                            Working...
                            X