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  • Body / Glass: Hood to cowl fitment

    With the hood height adjusted at the corners, the center is down in the middle.
    Don't have the gasket yet, but for it to work it will have to be very dense and hard.
    I would like to re-arch the hood to match the cowl, but it means re-acrching the inner brace.
    Any tips on how to do this without kinking? Or am I off on the wrong track here?
    Thanks.

  • #2
    Try the new gasket, before any bending. You might be suprised. Then you can adjust if necessary.
    Gently close the hood on a rubber block to persuade proper fit. (Not all at once, and not all in the same place on the hood)
    Bez Auto Alchemy
    573-318-8948
    http://bezautoalchemy.com


    "Don't believe every internet quote" Abe Lincoln

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    • #3
      +1 on the cowl gasket. Makes a tremendous difference. Don't try to adjust without it on, you'll be pulling your hair out when it does get on.
      '53 Commander
      Art Morrison chassis
      LS6 ASA/4L60E

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      • #4
        Originally posted by oldguy View Post
        With the hood height adjusted at the corners, the center is down in the middle.
        Don't have the gasket yet, but for it to work it will have to be very dense and hard.
        I would like to re-arch the hood to match the cowl, but it means re-acrching the inner brace.
        Any tips on how to do this without kinking? Or am I off on the wrong track here?
        Thanks.
        Which model & year are you working with

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        • #5
          Of course it will fit, I have a torch.
          It is to be hoped you're good with that torch and with a BFH.

          It's not fair, but it is hard not to compare our Studes to today's CNC-robot panel fitment standards. Given Studebaker's post-WWII complacent/incompetent managers having daily feuds with UAW adversarial labor union members, the result was really wandering panel fit being considered the norm. I've seen low-mileage original museum cars which look like a no-insurance garage repair. Literally no two panels on opposite sides of the car fit the same. Panel gaps were all over the place. Having said this, many other cars of the day weren't that much better.

          The hood, being such a large piece of tin, is usually the worst. Then, the one on your car may or may not be original and certainly has been opened and closed carelessly hundreds of times. On one Hawk show car I did, it cost $1000 in labor to make the hood fit decently on all four sides.

          Good luck.


          jack vines
          Last edited by PackardV8; 05-01-2011, 01:29 PM.
          PackardV8

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          • #6
            Thanks Jack, that makes me feel better.
            I'm putting a 53 coupe tub on a 62 frame. mix of 53 & 54 doors and fenders. Guy I bought the hood from didn't remember what it came off of. It has been sitting for many years, thought maybe it flattened out from sitting on the corners. Definitely have some gap issues, lol.
            That tag line was supposed to be a joke..... Karma I guess.

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            • #7
              I have found that many of these hoods need to be raised back up in the center section of the rear of the hood. I put a padded piece of wood between the hood and the cowl and gently work the rear of the hood into alignment. Easier to say than to do well.
              Gary L.
              Wappinger, NY

              SDC member since 1968
              Studebaker enthusiast much longer

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              • #8
                hood to cowl seal

                Question about the seal itself. Is it a soft seal to keep water out, or hard rubber to help position the hood?
                thanks.

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                • #9
                  Firm rubber, compresses a bit, but hard enough to provide some resistance. The groove faces up, but it'll go on both ways.

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                  • #10
                    Hood seal keeps water from draining on the distributor. Secondary purpose is alignment to cowl.
                    59 Lark wagon, now V-8, H.D. auto!
                    60 Lark convertible V-8 auto
                    61 Champ 1/2 ton 4 speed
                    62 Champ 3/4 ton 5 speed o/drive
                    62 Champ 3/4 ton auto
                    62 Daytona convertible V-8 4 speed & 62 Cruiser, auto.
                    63 G.T. Hawk R-2,4 speed
                    63 Avanti (2) R-1 auto
                    64 Zip Van
                    66 Daytona Sport Sedan(327)V-8 4 speed
                    66 Cruiser V-8 auto

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                    • #11
                      I wish that seal was softer. My hood won't sit flush with the cowl at the back since the seal is too stiff. I replaced the original one I had gotten from Packard Farms in the 90s with That one was "solid" but relatively soft with one obtained from Fennessey that was hollow but thinner and it helped some. Both were/are too stiff tho. Ideal one for me would be softer and even thinner.

                      Jeff in ND

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                      • #12
                        Me too.My problem is that when I lift the hood on my '53 even with a good 1/4" cowl to hood gap, it catches the cowl in the center, I spent all day working on it. I too have a fairly new soft cowl rubber, I ran a fish tape thru the hollow and pulled 4 pieces of nylon string about 1/8" in diameter, It definitely made it thicker. My hood just seems to be flat in the center, I'm wondering how to curve it. Maybe pillows under each corner and gently step on it. I've tried a block of wood wrapped in a rag between the cowl and hood and closing it no luck......maybe I need a thicker block of wood :-) ... its about 1"thick..........

                        The rubber is not the problem its when the hood is raised the clearance diminishes in the center part, out at the edges I still have the 1/4" gap.
                        Last edited by stuuder; 06-26-2011, 08:21 PM.

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                        • #13
                          My hood was also too low in the middle, and would catch when raising the hood, but the hood to cowl seal fixed that problem. The
                          original type was too thick; I found one at Steele rubber products that works well; they make both hard and soft rubber seals.

                          Joe D.

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                          • #14
                            I've got a 55 coupe and it has the worst fitting hood. Maybe the nature of the beast, but don't bend the hood. You look at it every time you're in the car maybe a little off won't hurt.

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                            • #15
                              Not to hi-jack this post, but, I have a new seal from S.I. It is roughly "c" shaped in cross section. Which way does the open side of the c face? Forward or backward? The car is a 61 Hawk. Thanks. Jim

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